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Halloween decorations

RedDinger

Old-Salt
A house on my street has a load of Halloween decorations up. Is this a thing now, or an isolated incident?
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Nope, my local rail station has had them up since Monday!
 
More tat for Chavs to spend their benefits on! At least they can keep the lights up through Christmas. :sad:
Thank feck I live out in the sticks.
 

Chef

LE
Halloween is pretty universal but the trick or treat bit is an American spin on it and didn't arrive in the UK until the 80s/90s.

The rest of its' growth is down to commercial interests making money out of it. Rather like father's day and all the other kak that 'requires' Hallmark cards to be purchased at great expense. Or not.
 
Halloween is pretty universal but the trick or treat bit is an American spin on it and didn't arrive in the UK until the 80s/90s.

The rest of its' growth is down to commercial interests making money out of it. Rather like father's day and all the other kak that 'requires' Hallmark cards to be purchased at great expense. Or not.
Partly untrue. In deepest darkest Scotland when I was a kid in the late 50s, early 60s, we made a lantern out of a turnip (the orange ones) and put a candle in it. I can still smell that burning turnip.....

Anyway, we'd get dragged round to friends' houses and be made to do 'a turn', after which we'd be rewarded with sweeties. (No subtext implied or intended - all we got was some sweeties!).

We were 'dressed up' usually with papier mache masks from Woolies and the event was known as 'Guising', I assume from us being dis-guised, but I'm prepared to be corrected on this.

I hate all the Americanism that has come into it now. You'd think they'd invented it - Salem Witch Hunts anyone?
 
Partly untrue. In deepest darkest Scotland when I was a kid in the late 50s, early 60s, we made a lantern out of a turnip (the orange ones) and put a candle in it. I can still smell that burning turnip.....

Anyway, we'd get dragged round to friends' houses and be made to do 'a turn', after which we'd be rewarded with sweeties. (No subtext implied or intended - all we got was some sweeties!).

We were 'dressed up' usually with papier mache masks from Woolies and the event was known as 'Guising', I assume from us being dis-guised, but I'm prepared to be corrected on this.

I hate all the Americanism that has come into it now. You'd think they'd invented it - Salem Witch Hunts anyone?

You beat me to it with your reply to Chef. I too remember the turnip lanterns and the dressing up to go guising. I also remember that as well as sweets some folks would give money instead, hence the little ditty below which was said when the homeowner answered the door.

Please to help the guisers a penny will do
If you haven't got a penny a ha'penny will do
If you haven't got a ha'penny then God bless you.
 
A house on my street has a load of Halloween decorations up. Is this a thing now, or an isolated incident?

A house in my village has got the Christmas decorations up, but I think they were just too lazy to take them down last year so they get to be early and be first this year
 

Diko

Old-Salt
In 1961 when Dad was posted to RAF North Luffenham, on the Thor rockets. There was a large American contingent of USAF service personnel living in mobile caravans on the airfield. The station commander asked our parents if us Brats could dress up scarily and go frighten them. This we did and we got loads of sweets.
 
In 1961 when Dad was posted to RAF North Luffenham, on the Thor rockets. There was a large American contingent of USAF service personnel living in mobile caravans on the airfield. The station commander asked our parents if us Brats could dress up scarily and go frighten them. This we did and we got loads of sweets.

Mobile Caravans????

Walting as pikeys, that would be cultural appropriation now and you'd have plod round investigating hate crimes faster than Katie Price can drop her knickers
 

Chef

LE
Partly untrue. In deepest darkest Scotland when I was a kid in the late 50s, early 60s, we made a lantern out of a turnip (the orange ones) and put a candle in it. I can still smell that burning turnip.....

Anyway, we'd get dragged round to friends' houses and be made to do 'a turn', after which we'd be rewarded with sweeties. (No subtext implied or intended - all we got was some sweeties!).

We were 'dressed up' usually with papier mache masks from Woolies and the event was known as 'Guising', I assume from us being dis-guised, but I'm prepared to be corrected on this.

I hate all the Americanism that has come into it now. You'd think they'd invented it - Salem Witch Hunts anyone?
I saw that on the Wiki entry but didn't know when that died out. Down south in that there London there was nothing like that where I lived just a bit of fuss on the TV.

I wonder if the guising has survived at all? I'd hope so.
 
I used to work in retail back in the late 80s and retail management in the early to mid 90s. I wish that we had had Halloween back then instead of having to play Christmas songs in the middle of bloody August.

At a previous employer we used to have to bring in cakes, etc., on our birthday. As my birthday is the day after Halloween I used to pop into the local Tesco on the way into work and buy a load of Halloween confectionery with reduced stickers on. It used to save me a fortune.
 
I saw that on the Wiki entry but didn't know when that died out. Down south in that there London there was nothing like that where I lived just a bit of fuss on the TV.

I wonder if the guising has survived at all? I'd hope so.

Halloween was good fun back when we did it as bairns, after the guising we would go home and dook/dunk for for apples in a basin of water, then there was the treacles scones hanging from a piece of string which you would try and take a bite from and would usually end up with the face covered in treacle.

It was all good fun.
 
I'd never heard of guising until this thread, did it happen down south anywhere, or did I grow up somewhere too posh to know of it?
 

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