Guy Liddell. Dairies of a Cold War Spymaster.

Guy Liddell. Dairies of a Cold War Spymaster.

Auld-Yin

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#1
Auld-Yin submitted a new resource:

Guy Liddell. Dairies of a Cold War Spymaster. - The Legacy of Guy Liddell, Deputy Director of MI5

A closely printed book of 260 pages, which in another form would have been twice the physical size.

This reviewer found this a very difficult book to read as it is very ‘dry’ as it has produced Liddell’s dairies almost verbatim in places. The author in my opinion has produced something nearer to a textbook of the Security Service documenting its failings, rather than a page turner of a work. These diaries would make an excellent reference work for those undertaking a study of the history of...
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#4
During World War 2 Liddell was head of Counter-Espionage and a candidate for the Deputy Director of MI5; then the Cambridge Five spy ring was exposed along with G.L.'s association* with Guy Burgess, Kim Philby and Anthony Blunt. One promising career gone pear shaped.

A London Times article in 2012 began with Guy Liddell’s secret diaries shed light on Cambridge spy scandal. G.L. made Deputy Director General but retired from MI5 in 1952/1953, his career damaged. But he did become security adviser to the Atomic Energy Commission.

'Nigel West' is R.W.S. (Rupert) Allason (ex MP, Con) with a reputation for being pretty good at this stuff. These diaries are dry, and really for serious study. If you prefer: try Operation Garbo: The Personal Story of the Most Successful Double Agent of World War II; Juan Pujol Garcia (Author), Nigel West (Author).

The only farm I can think of, @baboon6 , is Rothschild's Home Farm in Tring, aka Lord Rothschild’s estate house in Hertfordshire, listed as a British Intelligence Establishment (made available).

WALLFLOWERS is the codename given to one of the Security Service’s most treasured possessions, the daily journal dictated from August 1939 to June 1945 by MI5’s Director of Counter-Espionage, Guy Liddell, to his secretary, Margo Huggins. The document was considered so highly classified that it was retained in the safe of successive Directors-Generals, and special permission was required to read it.

Liddell was one of three brothers who all won the Military Cross during World War I and subsequently joined MI5. He initially served with the Metropolitan Police Special Branch at Scotland Yard, dealing primarily with cases of Soviet espionage, until he was transferred to MI5 in 1931. *His social connections proved important: in 1940 he employed Anthony Blunt as his personal assistant and he became a close friend of both Guy Burgess and Victor Rothschild, and was acquainted with Kim Philby.

Despite these links, when Liddell retired from the Security Service in 1952 he was appointed security adviser to the Atomic Energy Commission, an extremely sensitive post following the conviction of the physicist Klaus Fuchs two years earlier.
Prof M.R.D. Foot (the only person to be referred to by his real name in a John le Carré novel) thought Liddell's diaries a must-have, and they've been called an invaluable primary source for any scholar investigating the history of British Intelligence during the Second World War.
 
#5
An interesting and informative review. Something has been lost in the following sentence:
When interrogated, Philby sometime after Burgess and Maclean had fled the author this was more a gentlemanly chat to someone who had had training to resist interrogation.
West is very thorough and puts a lot of detail in his books.
 
#6
During World War 2 Liddell was head of Counter-Espionage and a candidate for the Deputy Director of MI5; then the Cambridge Five spy ring was exposed along with G.L.'s association* with Guy Burgess, Kim Philby and Anthony Blunt. One promising career gone pear shaped.

A London Times article in 2012 began with Guy Liddell’s secret diaries shed light on Cambridge spy scandal. G.L. made Deputy Director General but retired from MI5 in 1952/1953, his career damaged. But he did become security adviser to the Atomic Energy Commission.

'Nigel West' is R.W.S. (Rupert) Allason (ex MP, Con) with a reputation for being pretty good at this stuff. These diaries are dry, and really for serious study. If you prefer: try Operation Garbo: The Personal Story of the Most Successful Double Agent of World War II; Juan Pujol Garcia (Author), Nigel West (Author).

The only farm I can think of, @baboon6 , is Rothschild's Home Farm in Tring, aka Lord Rothschild’s estate house in Hertfordshire, listed as a British Intelligence Establishment (made available).

Prof M.R.D. Foot (the only person to be referred to by his real name in a John le Carré novel) thought Liddell's diaries a must-have, and they've been called an invaluable primary source for any scholar investigating the history of British Intelligence during the Second World War.
Yeah I've read most of Nigel West's books over the years but not that one. His work debunking fake spies is particularly good.
 
#7


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