Reference Image Guy "Ant" 15cwt GS

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The Guy Ant was prototyped in 1935 to meet a War Department specification for a 15 cwt infantry truck. Around 90 percent of the components was used in earlier trucks like the Vixen and the Otter. A civilian version of the Ant, known as the Vixant were also produced. These were used for what was then known as "essential transport applications". Early production Ants had a flat bonnet, canvas doors and aero screens. The bonnet was changed to the v-shaped type shown in later pictures. This was presumably done to clear additional ancillaries. The Ant had an unusual gear change pattern, opposite to the normal type.

In 1938 a four-wheel drive version (Quad-Ant) was launched, initially for use as a field artillery tractor. These were later produced by Karrier under licence from Guy.

The first order for 150 vehicles was received in January 1936, shortly after successfully taking part in the Army trials in Llangollen in 1935. Some 8.250 trucks were produced until March 1942, mostly as GS trucks and some equipped for cable laying. Some batches received house-type van bodies for wireless, light warning equipment, light machinery, recorder or equipped as compressor trucks.

Water tanker and fire truck variants were produced for domestic Government use.

As a part of an attempt to rationalise the post-war fleet on the British Army the Ant and Quad-Ant was declared obsolete and auctioned of or passed on to other countries.

Length: 4.39 m (173 inches). Width: 2.10 m (83 inches). Height: 2.20 m (87 inches). Weight: 3.314 kg (7.365 lb.).
Engine: 4-cylinder Meadows 4ELA, 3.686 cm3 (143 cubic inches) displacement, liquid cooled, carburettor.
Horsepower: 55 at 2.600 rpm. Transmission: 4-speed gearbox. Electrical system: 12 volt. Brakes: Mechanical.
Tyres: 9.00 - 16. Fuel type: Petrol. Fuel capacity: 91 liter (20 gallons).

Incidentally, Guy Motors used a silver Native American statuette with the logo "a feather in our caps" as a bonnet ornament on their post-war vehicles. I own one of the originals! (Worth about £250:00).
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#2
Is there any chance of collating reference images of all the wartime 15 cwt trucks? As you say, as an attempt to rationalist the fleet, this particular model was sold off straight afterwards, but others lingered on, certainly until the great 1957 contracts* which came as a result of Suez, which saw the genre binned entirely by the early '60s, at least until the 3/4 ton Land Rover arrived and 'sort of' replaced it.

*The contracts were for 10 yrs vehicles, 15 yrs spares, a contract worth bidding for. Winners were; Bedford RL 3 ton, Austin K9 1 ton. L/R 1/4 ton, all 4 X 4. There were further great things in that contract, some of which were changed slightly as the years went by and technology advanced. These included wipers, bulbs and rubies and to some extent mirrors, interchangeable between all of the above. Sadly few kit manufacturers look too closely at this period.
 

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Is there any chance of collating reference images of all the wartime 15 cwt trucks? As you say, as an attempt to rationalist the fleet, this particular model was sold off straight afterwards, but others lingered on, certainly until the great 1957 contracts* which came as a result of Suez, which saw the genre binned entirely by the early '60s, at least until the 3/4 ton Land Rover arrived and 'sort of' replaced it.

*The contracts were for 10 yrs vehicles, 15 yrs spares, a contract worth bidding for. Winners were; Bedford RL 3 ton, Austin K9 1 ton. L/R 1/4 ton, all 4 X 4. There were further great things in that contract, some of which were changed slightly as the years went by and technology advanced. These included wipers, bulbs and rubies and to some extent mirrors, interchangeable between all of the above. Sadly few kit manufacturers look too closely at this period.
I am working on exactly that. If you can however, get hold of Mike Conniford's excellent book British Light Military Trucks 1939-1945 (ISBN 0-85242-447-7), you will find it very interesting. The book may well be out of print now as it was first published in 1976 but copies appear on e-bay and other used book sites.

I did a review of this book earlier in the year, check out @Auld-Yin's reviews section.

Your final sentence rings very true. I have tried to build a collection of British Trucks from WW2. Bedfords are easy, but there is virtually nothing else in 1:35 scale. Go down to 1:72/1:76 and suppliers like Milicast, David Parkins, and S & S models come to the fore. Again, I have reviewed both Milicast and S & S; Milicast are certainly the best option for excellent quality resin kits. Hope this helps.
 
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