Gurkha Women

#2
2nd and 3rd generation UK-domiciled male Gurkhas have been going main stream Army for a while, now: indeed, one was graduating from Welbeck this year and heading toward REME.
 
#5
Gurkhas to recruit women for first time

I presume this will be in to the QGS, QGE, QOGLR & GSPS rather than the RGR?

I was under the impression a number of Gurkha daughters already served, albeit in non Gurkha units.
I am not 100% certain but I don't think that RGR got a 'pass' in regards to WGCC and the opening up of the Infantry to females. In addition, and unlike other capbadges, currently all Gurkha soldiers complete the full Infantry course at ITC (42 weeks I think) and then those not going RGR go on to Phase 2 training for their capbadge.
 
#6
A large part of allowing women in will be a degree of self preservation. If the Gurkhas didn’t allow women in as the rest of the Forces are mandated to, they would just become a lightning rod for for equal rights groups and such and eventually be relegated to being a footnote in British Army history.
 
#9
2nd and 3rd generation UK-domiciled male Gurkhas have been going main stream Army for a while, now: indeed, one was graduating from Welbeck this year and heading toward REME.
Not correct.

They're not "UK-domiciled male Gurkhas", they're British citizens of Nepalese descent.

Nepalese are only eligible to join the British Army by joining the Bde of Gurkhas, recruited and selected in Nepal. After serving five years in the Bde they are eligible to apply for transfer to other Regular Army units.

This also applies to any Nepalese who have indefinite right to remain in the UK: they're not British / Irish / Commonwealth citizens so not eligible to join the British Army other than to the Bde of Gurkhas. In practice this doesn't happen as Gurkhas who have indefinite right to remain and do so invariably become British citizens, as do their children; technically if they retained dual nationality their children could return to Nepal and be recruited and selected in Nepal, as Nepalese, but AFAIK this has never happened and is very unlikely to happen.

Conversely, British children of Nepalese descent (children of serving / ex-Gurkhas who have become British citizens, so second generation British) are not eligible to join the Bde of Gurkhas unless they have retained Nepalese nationality and return to Nepal to do so (see above), unless it's as officers (like any other British citizen, regardless of descent).

I know there have been female QARANC from Gurkha families, since as long ago as the 60s.

https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/women-recruits-in-the-bde-of-gurkhas.27571/
Again, not correct.

These aren't "Gurkha families" but British families of Nepalese descent, and they can join the British Army, including the QA's, just like any other British citizen (but, like any other British citizen, not the Bde of Gurkhas)

Again, not correct.

She was a QA (see cap badge), possibly attached to 1/7th or 2/7th (again, see cap badges) although this seems unlikely.

There was no 'Gurkha Regiment' in 1968, but a number of different regiments (2, 6, 7 and 10) and Corps units. The photo is also not of the 'Gurkha Band', as none are wearing a Gurkha Staff Band cap badge, but of Regimental Pipes and Drums from 7 GR and possibly 10 GR.

Her name would also be very unlikely to have been 'Rai Krishna' as Rai is a caste (surname), not a first name, and Krishna is a boy's name, not a girl's. Given those inaccuracies, and that while 7 GR was in the UK in 1968 but 10 GR wasn't, it's far more likely that she was just visiting either 7 GR or a Gurkha Pipes and Drums concentration.
 
#10
The pipers in the photo are from 7 GR and 10 GR, if you know your Gurkha uniforms you can tell. The 7 GR pipers are wearing Douglas plaids from the association with the Cameronians and the 10 GR pipers are wearing Hunting Stewart of the Royal Scots as they had taught them the Pipes in the early years. The plaid broaches, also denote the two different regiments.
 
#11
The pipers in the photo are from 7 GR and 10 GR, if you know your Gurkha uniforms you can tell. The 7 GR pipers are wearing Douglas plaids from the association with the Cameronians and the 10 GR pipers are wearing Hunting Stewart of the Royal Scots as they had taught them the Pipes in the early years. The plaid broaches, also denote the two different regiments.
Sorry to be pedantic, but although two are definitely 7GR you can't actually tell quite so definitively about the one who appears to be 10GR, although that's the most likely.

The cap badge isn't that clear, but although he's definitely not from any other British Army Gurkha unit other than 10GR he could also possibly be from the Gurkha Contingent Singapore Police whose tartan is similar (particularly in black and white) as is their plaid brooch, although I believe they've changed since. If it was a concentration, as seems likely, the Gurkha Contingent Singapore Police Pipes and Drums may well have also attended at that time.

(It's raining here ...)

Edit: GCSP have a black 'bobble' on their hats rather than a red one, but again it's not possible to tell from a b&w photo.

More on topic, reportedly at least two women intend applying for the Bde but it's highly unlikely they'll get past the first hurdle as you can't just pole up to a recruiting office and apply but you have to be selected and recruited by a local recruiter first.
 
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#13
Sorry to be pedantic, but although two are definitely 7GR you can't actually tell quite so definitively about the one who appears to be 10GR, although that's the most likely.

The cap badge isn't that clear, but although he's definitely not from any other British Army Gurkha unit other than 10GR he could also possibly be from the Gurkha Contingent Singapore Police whose tartan is similar (particularly in black and white) as is their plaid brooch, although I believe they've changed since. If it was a concentration, as seems likely, the Gurkha Contingent Singapore Police Pipes and Drums may well have also attended at that time.

(It's raining here ...)

Edit: GCSP have a black 'bobble' on their hats rather than a red one, but again it's not possible to tell from a b&w photo.

More on topic, reportedly at least two women intend applying for the Bde but it's highly unlikely they'll get past the first hurdle as you can't just pole up to a recruiting office and apply but you have to be selected and recruited by a local recruiter first.
Second Gurkha from the left (face partially obscured) is surely 10th (PMO) Gurkha Rifles. To my eyes his badge is as clear as the two from 7th (DEO) Gurkha Rifles.

Sad to see those fine Regiments' names disappear.

On the gender issue, RGR could probably dodge the issue by claiming numbers of marunis.
 
#14
Any worth a bang or not?
An emphatic yes, they take no prisoners, are strong and feisty - but their husbands get quite cross.

Straying across that particular line results in an emergency posting, and a strong recommendation that you never, ever, visit Aldershot, Dover, Nuneaton or York........
 
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#15
An emphatic yes, they take no prisoners, are strong and feisty - but their husbands get quite cross.

Straying across that particular line results in an emergency posting, and a recommendation that you never, ever, visit Aldershot, Dover, Nuneaton or York........
Ok. So it was you that got chased across Maida Vale playing fields by the angry brown chap with the big knife
 
#16
Ok. So it was you that got chased across Maida Vale playing fields by the angry brown chap with the big knife
Not me guv'nor, wrong capbadge. I used to wear a 'Jimmy' on my beret.
 
#18
Ahhhhh. Is that the one that looks like a gay dancer.

( ducks awaiting incoming from all the Signallers on here)
Bleeps or not, yes, Jimmy does look like a gay dancer - immortalised in the midst of what appears to be a pirouette.
 
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#19
Second Gurkha from the left (face partially obscured) is surely 10th (PMO) Gurkha Rifles. To my eyes his badge is as clear as the two from 7th (DEO) Gurkha Rifles.
Yes, indeed it is.
It was the Band of the Brigade of Gurkhas who were on tour in UK in 1968.

Hackle's statement ;
"I know there have been female QARANC from Gurkha families, since as long ago as the 60s."
is absolutely correct.

Gurkha females were first recruited into QARANC in the late fifties, primarily to serve in BMHs, British Military Maternity Hospitals and Army Chest Hospitals* in the Far East where Gurkha soldiers were stationed.

They would be trained in UK and those qualifying as SRNs would be commissioned.
They were indeed from Gurkha families as they were 'line-girls' educated in British army schools.

Edited;
*Because of the prevalence of TB in Nepal, there would be significant Gurkha numbers in the Chest Hospitals
 
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