Guns in the ACF

HE117

LE

HE117

LE
The L98 was a garbage modification to an already struggle l85a1 that didnt work properly. That stupid cocking handle that they welded onto the side to placate some school head master somewhere was a nightmare. The amount of stoppages we used to get was laughable.
The L98 was built from scratch although used some standard components.

The cocking handle crank was necessary as the gun did not have primary extraction and it would have been very difficult to eject a spent case just using the standard handle. This is a common problem with all neutered semi autos, which never work properly in manual mode, as anyone who has a straight pull SLR will tell you...
 

dwills

War Hero
We also had number of BSA Airsporter .22 air rifles. These could be used with pellets but we also used
blu tack for 'urban warfare training'. This was entirely extra-curricular of course. Those pesky blu tack rounds could bloody sting.
One of the very reason, more rules are applied.
 
One of the very reason, more rules are applied.
Ha! I suppose they've banned improvised AP ED skills as well (AKA, the crow-scarer, clingfilm wrapped and stuffed in a root vegetable)
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
This is a flechette from a tank round. In this case IDF: They killed a colleague with a burst in Gaza.View attachment 474041
interesting ta, I've seen them in the combat shotgun, 40mm grenade and 5.56 variants but assumed the tank ones would be a bit bigger.
 
interesting ta, I've seen them in the combat shotgun, 40mm grenade and 5.56 variants but assumed the tank ones would be a bit bigger.
There's probably just more of them.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
There's probably just more of them.
the langridge approach - then. a giant blunderbuss - not sure I'd like to be in front of that.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
"snigger"
peer pressure - family was RAF and I went with a couple from my class, but to be fair they did a lot on the .22 range and had lumpy jumpers which scouts didn't.

my mates daughters go to air cadets and they do a lot of swimming along with shooting twice a week.
 
ISTR where the gas system went in the selective fire version, they chose the space in the handguard of the L98 to store an oil bottle...which would promptly melt or break whenever the barrel got up to any kind of temperature? or am I imagining things at a distance of thirty odd years?

I do remember an upper and lower made of the flimsiest metal that you could twist quite easily when you were stripping it if you weren't careful.
The space where the gas parts used to be was always empty on the various rifles i used as a kid. The covers used to pop open when we fired. It was such a shit design.
 
The L98 was built from scratch although used some standard components.

The cocking handle crank was necessary as the gun did not have primary extraction and it would have been very difficult to eject a spent case just using the standard handle. This is a common problem with all neutered semi autos, which never work properly in manual mode, as anyone who has a straight pull SLR will tell you...
What i find frustrating was that it was a modification that should never have been made in the first place. We used to sign out l85-a1's on exercise because the L98a1 was no good. We only used it on the range if i recall correctly and nobody liked it. If you did not pull the bold back like you were trying to tear it off and let go at just the right sweet spot, if would fail to feed.
 
The first rifle I fired as a space cadet was a no.4 mk1 on camp at RAF Conningsby.. Put 5 rounds into the centre of the white patch. RSO looked at the target, said 'Do that again' so I did and came away with an RAF marksman badge :) Fun times.
I did something similar with my first go on A Certain Rifle. Five rounds touching a (1970s) ten p piece was enough for cadet marksman and if you could drop five rounds onto a shilling/5p piece at 25 m twice in a row you got RAF marksman. Sounds Mickey Mouse but those were the criteria the regular RAF instructors who took us on the range were using at the time!
 

HE117

LE
What i find frustrating was that it was a modification that should never have been made in the first place. We used to sign out l85-a1's on exercise because the L98a1 was no good. We only used it on the range if i recall correctly and nobody liked it. If you did not pull the bold back like you were trying to tear it off and let go at just the right sweet spot, if would fail to feed.
I was explaining the reason for the crank handle..

I never said it was any good!

The cadets should have been issued with the BSA Cadet Rifle (... see Stoaty's video) which would have met the requirement, and maybe have saved the Birmingham gun trade..!
 

HE117

LE
I was explaining the reason for the crank handle..

I never said it was any good!

The cadets should have been issued with the BSA Cadet Rifle (... see Stoaty's video) which would have met the requirement, and maybe have saved the Birmingham gun trade..!
Hmm, I think that they should have just used a semi auto l85 all along. There was never a good reason to insist upon bolt action / single shot. I understood that it was derived from a head master at a school with a CCF unit and armoury attached and he was frightened by the sight of a sa80 and insisted that any rifle to be held on the school grounds had to look less like an "assault rifle"

He should have been taken to the school field, blindfolded and shot before being replaced with a head master with some common sense.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Christ, things were easier back in the day. My school CCF had thousands of rounds of .303 and sent a large proportion of them down the range at Bisley (few miles away). I have distinct memories of firing the Bren in bursts of 2-3 rounds, as well, but forget where - Ash Ranges, probably.

As I recall we had .22 Anschutz for the indoor range, super special No 4s for competition shooting and plain old boring No 4s for humping around and blatting at the ranges, plus a brace of Bren guns. There were also a bunch of .38 Webleys which the masters (all of whom had either wartime or post-war conscript service behind them, carried) which the specky girly swots who were their golden-haired favourites got to shoot occasionally.
 

W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
Why do you say that, CSBTR's only come in recently hasn't it?
.22 shooting is going to become 'elective' with air rifle being the core syllabus for shooting. A retrograde step in my belief. The CSBTR is a sweet little rifle to shoot, but just how complex can you make the drills for a single shot bolt action .22 rifle.
 

Boxy

GCM
.22 shooting is going to become 'elective' with air rifle being the core syllabus for shooting. A retrograde step in my belief. The CSBTR is a sweet little rifle to shoot, but just how complex can you make the drills for a single shot bolt action .22 rifle.
Tap Forward, nuff said
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
 

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