Reference Image Guns and Tows - for all WW2 artillery and their towing vehicles

They are usually correct, but the carriage looks more like that of the 4.5" to me.
6in 26cwt howitzer, used in mixed regiments with 60pdr Mk IIs. The 5.5in eventually replaced both (and the 4.5in gun).

7.2" Mk 6, which used a US mount.
The M1 mounting for the 155mm gun. We used these up 'til the advent of the US 8in M110 and 175mm M107 SPs. After they had been in storage for a while all were sold to India, where they were put into reserve for potential crowd control duties. And our liberals whinge about baton rounds!
 


Something made me wonder about this photo. I've got my old British Vehicle Markings book down from the attic, the formation sign is for the 49th (West Riding) Division and the turquoise arm-of-service patch implies RE but the divisional RE units had numbers 48 to 52.



In the same way the formation sign is for the 1st Polish Armoured Division and the regimental arm-of-service colours are right but the number should be 74 or 76. The battery sign above it is for the fourth battery of a unit that only had three. B would be used by the second gun of the first troop of the battery but there is no record of Bc: a battery had eight gun Sextons A to D and E to H and two unarmed ones for the two troop gun position officers, GA to GF in the six troops of the three batteries.
 
Fort Nelson..... I thought I recognized it :)

Arrse view :)
IMG_20180527_110010.jpg
 


Something made me wonder about this photo. I've got my old British Vehicle Markings book down from the attic, the formation sign is for the 49th (West Riding) Division and the turquoise arm-of-service patch implies RE but the divisional RE units had numbers 48 to 52.



In the same way the formation sign is for the 1st Polish Armoured Division and the regimental arm-of-service colours are right but the number should be 74 or 76. The battery sign above it is for the fourth battery of a unit that only had three. B would be used by the second gun of the first troop of the battery but there is no record of Bc: a battery had eight gun Sextons A to D and E to H and two unarmed ones for the two troop gun position officers, GA to GF in the six troops of the three batteries.
Restored vehicles do often have some howlers when it comes to markings, but might that be an earlier serial from 49 Div's days in Iceland or somesuch? They did change them periodically as a counter-intelligence measure. I agree on the serial for 1944/45, but have no idea what they were sporting earlier. I also agree re the Sexton.
 
Thanks, all of my in laws were RFA and RA field arty in both wars, nothing bigger than 18 then 25 pounders. I seem to recall 60 pounders were used in North Africa but not for long!
Absolutely right! The Field Regiments all had 25pdrs (18pdrs before that). However, Heavy Regts had heavy guns (7.2" & 8") and the Medium Regts had medium guns (4.5" and 5.5"). There were also Light Regts, Super-Heavy Regts, Mountain Regts, Jungle Regts, Mortar Regts...

The Heavy Regts were very rare compared to Field Regts - roughly one such regt per Corps.
 
Restored vehicles do often have some howlers when it comes to markings, but might that be an earlier serial from 49 Div's days in Iceland or somesuch? They did change them periodically as a counter-intelligence measure. I agree on the serial for 1944/45, but have no idea what they were sporting earlier. I also agree re the Sexton.
Unlikely to be Iceland as the No 13 cab wasn't issued until early 1942. For all my cantankerousness the rebuilds are still good efforts.
 
R.M.A. steam tractor hauling barrel of a 6 inch Mark VII gun. July 1917.
WW1 British tractor.jpg
 
Ford based trial for a 25 pounder portee
00.jpg
03.jpg
04.jpg


Oddly, it got chinned off ;)
 
Morris Commercial Roadless Mk.II Half-Track Field Artillery Tractor
Morris Commercial Roadless Mk.II Half-Track Field Artillery Tractor.png



Thornycroft XB FC, 3-5 ton, 6 x 4, Artillery Portee Lorry carrying gun crew, 18 pounder field gun, limber and Cletrac Tractor.
Thornycroft XB FC, 3-5 ton, 6 x 4, Artillery Portee Lorry carrying gun crew, 18 pounder field ...jpg
 
AEC Matador

aec matador 25 pdr portee.jpg




AEC Matador Early Production Type - artillery tractors towing 6-inch howitzers.jpg




The AEC Mk.I Gun Carrier, Deacon was an improvized British tank hunter devised for the North A...jpg
 


Morris tried again in WW2: their Traclat, guess what it's based on....
 
Thanks, all of my in laws were RFA and RA field arty in both wars, nothing bigger than 18 then 25 pounders. I seem to recall 60 pounders were used in North Africa but not for long!
@ugly, try this website:-

British Artillery in World War 2

It's got all you'll ever need to know about the RA field (and ATk) branch in WW2.
 
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7.2-inch gun and Scammell tractor of 18-56th Heavy Regiment 23rd December 1943 View attachment 349185


View attachment 349186

Battery of self-propelled artillery pieces M7 Priest of the 33rd Royal Field Artillery Regiment in the field near the French village of Hermanville-sur-Mer. View attachment 349187
That top image is of a gun belonging to the regiment in which Spike Milligan was a signaller. A good illustration of the Italian terrain.

Bugger - well beaten to it by @Gardner6LXB! :(
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
6in 26cwt howitzer, used in mixed regiments with 60pdr Mk IIs. The 5.5in eventually replaced both (and the 4.5in gun).
The IWM have removed the page with that print. https://www.iwmprints.org.uk/image/...-during-the-attack-on-bardia-31-december-1940

I emailed them and they responded that they would get the curators to look at it. In my mind you are absolutely right, not least because Bardia was later 1940/early 41 and the 7.2" was only coming into production in 1940.

Hopefully we'll see an updated page soon.
 
The British Anti-Tank Regiments within 21st Army Group had the following guns and tractors by October 1944:-

Armoured Division
2 x Battery, each 3 Troops of 4 M10s, being replaced by Achilles
2 x Battery, each 3 Troops of 17pdrs towed by Halftracks

Infantry Division
4 x Battery, each 1 Troop of 3 Archers, 1 Troop of 3 17pdrs towed by Halftracks (which were replacing Morris C8s) and 1 Troop 4 6pdrs towed by Loyd Carriers.

Later one Battery was converted to 3 Troops of 3 Archers.

Corps
As Armoured Division but Crusader Gun Tractors instead of Halftracks in the towed Batteries.

Canadian regiments were the same.
 

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