Reference Image Guns and Tows - for all WW2 artillery and their towing vehicles

Caption said 8, but I know nothing, my stuff only goes to 105mm.
 
The 8in Mks VII and VIII were used as the base for the 7.2in Mks I to V, which is why it's effing hard to tell them apart! ;)
 
This one says its a 7.2. That's a mighty big gun!

 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Were they GS for WW2 or left overs from WW1? You dont often see British Field Artillery bigger then 5.5 after Alamein!
 
Why didnt we continue to use Limbers like the 25 pounder for 105s? Seems like a good way to move ammo about?

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Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
Were they GS for WW2 or left overs from WW1? You dont often see British Field Artillery bigger then 5.5 after Alamein!
Newly developed. The old 8" howitzers were WW1 vintage, but the 7.2" howitzers were developed in WW2 to have a better range (actually the 8" howitzers were re-bored).

They were reasonably common but, being heavy artillery, were limited in their availability and mobility and only really used in defence and 'set-piece situations. The 8-inch versions were the guns that Spike Milligan initially served during his wartime service, moving to 7.2" later on.
 
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ugly

LE
Moderator
Newly developed. The old 8" howitzers were WW1 vintage, but the 7.2" howitzers were developed in WW2 to have a better range (actually the 8" howitzers were re-bored).

They were reasonably common but, being heavy artillery, were limited in their availability and mobility and only really used in defence and 'set-piece situations. The 8-inch versions were the guns that Spike Milligan initially served during his wartime service, moving to 7.2" later on.
Newly developed. The old 8" howitzers were WW1 vintage, but the 7.2" howitzers were developed in WW2 to have a better range (actually the 8" howitzers were re-bored).

They were reasonably common but, being heavy artillery, were limited in their availability and mobility and only really used in defence and 'set-piece situations. The 8-inch versions were the guns that Spike Milligan initially served during his wartime service, moving to 7.2" later on.
Thanks, all of my in laws were RFA and RA field arty in both wars, nothing bigger than 18 then 25 pounders. I seem to recall 60 pounders were used in North Africa but not for long!
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
IWM photo showing a 7.2" in action at Bardia in 1940.



They are usually correct, but the carriage looks more like that of the 4.5" to me.
 
Wow! Amazing! Great poses on the figures.
 
It looks 'right'. Brilliant!
 

ABNredleg

Old-Salt
7.2" Mk 6, which used a US mount.

1549304409746.png
1549304278349.png
 
Caption says 7.2 in howitzer Mk 6, on the US M1 carriage. Rhine crossing, 1945. Used up to the 60's.
7.2_inch_howitzers_at_Rhine_crossing_1945_IWM_B_15776.jpg
 

daz

LE
Newly developed. The old 8" howitzers were WW1 vintage, but the 7.2" howitzers were developed in WW2 to have a better range (actually the 8" howitzers were re-bored).

They were reasonably common but, being heavy artillery, were limited in their availability and mobility and only really used in defence and 'set-piece situations. The 8-inch versions were the guns that Spike Milligan initially served during his wartime service, moving to 7.2" later on.
From memory, Harry Secombe lost one in one of the books, thats how he met Spike
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
From memory, Harry Secombe lost one in one of the books, thats how he met Spike
Indeed, the recoil of the howitzer rolled it over the edge of a small cliff and almost onto Secombe who was in a different RA unit and innocently sat in a wireless truck. Milligan apparently lifted the flap of the truck and asked, 'Has anyone seen a gun?', to which Secombe replied, 'I don't know, what colour was it?'
 

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