Gun oil substitute

#1
Last year I was on a shotgun course, after a couple of hours the instructor comes along with a squirty bottle thing and we all oil up the working parts, same again in the afternoon.

I mention gun oil cost and he says it only costs a couple of dollars for a pint. What is it? Automatic transmission oil mixed with 10% engine oil. Used by many a police department, Federal Agency armory and issued in cleaning kits.

Turns out its one of those things that "those in the know" have known for ages and that the difference between automatic transmission oil and gun oil is so fine that you could'nt squeeze a fag paper between them.

Now tell me you all knew.
 
#4
so whats the COSH and legality of mixing-up your own brew and selling it off?
 
#6
Pork fat!
 
#10
They gave us liniseed oil once by accident. We were in ******* Crossmaglen as well. That would have been a bad day if it had kicked off!
 
#11
Cold pressed olive oil, extra vergine. Second to none, failing that WD40?
 
#13
I've always heard that leaving gas parts in Coke overnight does a great job of removing the carbon. Is that the case or another tall tale?
If memory serves, it only softened the carbon.I remember using some pink kit with phosphoric acid in it, it was rust remover but it fairly cleaned the gas parts. Only trouble was that after a while they took on a decidedly pink hue.
Red eds works: easy to make in bulk, cleans hardened carbon and also good for starting fires.
 
#14
Indeed - wouldn't graphite make the oil look cloudy?
No, it's very fine particles, Graphite is a DRY lubricant, noticed how if you rub the end of a pencil it makes them all slipery, also Grphite is very high temprature resistant.

Castrol GTX was invented with added graphite (not too sure if GTX means Graphite Technology *****) anyhow it became original equipment recomendations on all Ford Pinto engines (Cortina, Sierra, Transit ) engines as the oil flow was shit on the OHC, hence the graphite and the dry film lubricant.
 
#15
I realise that the graphite would be fine (and what it's for), I just thought that adding any sort of solid to a liquid would generally make it cloudy - but I've been wrong before!
 
#16
I've always heard that leaving gas parts in Coke overnight does a great job of removing the carbon. Is that the case or another tall tale?
Wash in hot water, the hotter the better, use a nail brush or similar and the carbon will veritably jump off in its enthusiasm to please. THE HOTTER THE WATER THE MORE READILY THE ITEM WILL SPONTANEOUSLY DRY ITSELF BUT MAKE SURE THAT ALL MOISTURE IS REMOVED. To ensure dryness use WD40, which is designed as a moisture remover, wipe off WD40 then oil as appropriate. I learned the trick from a mate who had a couple of stainless blackpowder pistols which he used to drop in a washing up bowl then go over them with nylon brushes.

Do not get caught washing your SA80 or Minimi - bad juju would descend upon you.

Note: I washed the gas plug and piston on my SLR & browning barrel, nowadays on my own stuff I hot wash the gas plug and piston of my rifle and the barrels of pistols.
 
#17
I realise that the graphite would be fine (and what it's for), I just thought that adding any sort of solid to a liquid would generally make it cloudy - but I've been wrong before!
Or, you could add a squidge of PTFE lubricant.
 
#18
Wash in hot water, the hotter the better, use a nail brush or similar and the carbon will veritably jump off in its enthusiasm to please. THE HOTTER THE WATER THE MORE READILY THE ITEM WILL SPONTANEOUSLY DRY ITSELF BUT MAKE SURE THAT ALL MOISTURE IS REMOVED. To ensure dryness use WD40, which is designed as a moisture remover, wipe off WD40 then oil as appropriate. I learned the trick from a mate who had a couple of stainless blackpowder pistols which he used to drop in a washing up bowl then go over them with nylon brushes.

Note: I washed the gas plug and piston on my SLR & browning barrel, nowadays on my own stuff I hot wash the gas plug and piston of my rifle and the barrels of pistols.
This was an old trick of mine. Back off operations, a long exercise or even a heavy day at the ranges.

Run a bath with boiling hot water in it. Strip the weapon right down. I even used to break the SLR in half although you wern't supposed to so I could make sure it was completely dry afterwards. Dunk everything in the bath for a few minutes, take it out and clean it. Match heads and a scraping with the little tool from the cleaning kit easily did away with the carbon build up. Dunk it back in for a couple of more minutes. Take it out again and dry it all off. Most of the water because it was so hot evaporated away. A light oiling and pull through with a lightly oiled piece of 4 x 2 and job jobbed.

End result. One immaculately clean SLR.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#19
I seem to recall at Haltern Ranges a belfast sink big enough to get the GPMG bodies in and it was needed, Haltern was all fecking sand.
 
#20
Spotlessly clean? Kerosene bath it down the REME Wksp. Don't let the armoured catch you though and make sure you oil the crap out of it after.......
 

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