Gun Crime Database To Track Weapons

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Archangel, Mar 2, 2009.

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  1. Only a matter of time before somebody suggests that all registered firearms are put on the database. Just in case. Can never be too careful you know.

    However since 2001 new pistols and revolvers sold in New York state have been entered into the Combined Ballistic Identification System database maintained by state police. It costs $1 million a year to run.

    209,239 database entries. 7,124 inquiries. 2 matches found.

    Criminal prosecutions resulting? None. Nix. Nil. Nada
     
  2. Excellent point!

    The vast majority of illegal firearms (at least in the UK) tend to be re-activated weapons or converted replicas. These are provided with steel barrel inserts which .. err.. tend not to be registered on a nice neat Government database 8O

    The government's SOP for dealing with any problem? Build a database! It makes you look like you're doing something while at the same time avoids you ever having to address the actual problem!
     
  3. Really? So all the East Block weapons for sale at the pub are ex-deacs?

    Strange that they're cheaper (less than half the price)than normal deacs, isn't it?
     
  4. Bouillabaisse

    Bouillabaisse LE Book Reviewer

    I'm very surprised this doesn't exist already. How else have they been working out if a gun has been used elsewhere in the country? And why is it news? Police in "Doing their job" Shock
     
  5. No... you're right. We get those as well (and knock offs from China.. but not as many)
     
  6. So when plod goes to scene of a shooting NABIS will be able to state "oh this weapon has been used in 4 other previous shootings". We have no idea who the person is but thought that may cheer you up.


    Sounds as helpful as the cones hotline

    From wikpedia

    The hotline was widely seen as being a waste of government resources, costing several thousand pounds per year to run. It was quietly disbanded in September of 1995,[1] having fielded a total of fewer than twenty thousand calls. It was rumoured that many of these calls were not serious enquiries, with many a prankster calling up to request a "'99 with raspberry sauce".
     
  7. That was bolleaux Nu Lab propaganda a few years ago when they wanted to ban replicas and de-acs, and is equally bolleaux now.
     
  8. In my area,guns are available in certain' pubs.However,they usually are not supplied with spare mag and cleaning kit.
     
  9. Could you supply a link or evidence to support that statement?.
     
  10. because this isn't in the NAAFI I'll keep my post polite...

    AGAIN the police are trying to do something which MAY be of use and AGAIN all arrsedom wants to take the urine.

    The NABIS system does have a reasonable chance of collating firearm details, the system might not immediately put a suspects name in the frame, but further down the line IT MAY be able to do so.

    lets at least give it a fair crack of the whip before being totally negative.

    I work in a SOCO office and when we score a SOCO related conviction we are all able to feel a tad more worthwhile. The biggest p isser is when CPS and the magistracy will probably let the ba stard off with a trivial punishment.
     
  11. Medman, equivalent databases in the US have been shown to be white elephants.

    You expect Neue Arbeit's one to be any different???

    Hence the skepticism.
     
  12. David Davis, the Shadow Home Secretary, said that deactivated weapons accounted for a tiny proportion of gun crime. There were four recorded offences in England and Wales in 2005-06 in which a deactivated firearm was used and a further four involving reactivated weapons, out of a total of 21,521 recorded incidents.

    Mr Davis said: “While we welcome any action, however overdue it may be, to tackle the scourge of gun crime the Government’s own figures show that in 2005-06 there were only eight incidents where deactivated or reactivated weapons were used – just 0.04 per cent of gun offences.





    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article3168607.ece
     
  13. David Davis, the Shadow Home Secretary, said that deactivated weapons accounted for a tiny proportion of gun crime. There were four recorded offences in England and Wales in 2005-06 in which a deactivated firearm was used and a further four involving reactivated weapons, out of a total of 21,521 recorded incidents.

    Mr Davis said: “While we welcome any action, however overdue it may be, to tackle the scourge of gun crime the Government’s own figures show that in 2005-06 there were only eight incidents where deactivated or reactivated weapons were used – just 0.04 per cent of gun offences.

    Thanks
    Basically what I thought.

    The regurgitation of the re activation/ conversion myth annoys me.
    It's time it was debunked.

    But hey, why should the facts stand in the way of a story?




    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article3168607.ece[/quote]