Guilty plea over train documents

#1
A senior civil servant has pleaded guilty to breaching the Official Secrets Act after leaving top secret documents on a train in June.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7695095.stm

Good to see someone actually carry the can for once.

msr
 
#2
If they're that secret, why was he allowed to take them onto the train? At least they could have been on a CD, encrypted, in his pocket, or sent ahead by secure courier.

I may be cynical, but the MOD seems to "lose" things with startling regularity. Perhaps a more detailed system of inquiry is required into each incident...
 
#3
He'll probably get off with a good talking to, and a slap on wrist. Followed by Knighthood, pension, retirement and sail off into oblivion.
 
#5
Knowing the world in which we live I wonder if, after some negotiating between the CPS and the defence barristers, this guilty plea is to a lesser charge of littering in order to avoid a messy and expensive trial on the original OSA charge?
Call me cynical but...

Edited to add - just seen the sentence (if you can call it that). They took this VERY seriously then, oh yes indeedy... :x
 
#7
Definitely not a slap on the wrist - grapevine rumours suggest the guy has been utterly hung out to dry on this case.
 
#8
jim30 said:
Definitely not a slap on the wrist - grapevine rumours suggest the guy has been utterly hung out to dry on this case.
Hung out to dry? Quite rightly I would suggest.

Update: £2,500 fine and £250 costs. Ho hum.

msr
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
Fine £2500.00 and £250.00 costs.


And a "Box 5: Not Fitted" on his annual report.
 
#11
Bravo_Zulu said:
things with startling regularity. Perhaps a more detailed system of inquiry is required into each incident...
Strange how that always has an impact on Military Sy policy too - as we have to be punished/limited by these mongs.
 
#15
Well by implication "Top Secret" implies that the information under that classification is potentially useful to those who would wish the state harm. Otherwise it could have been any of the other security classifications lower. Quite why something Top Secret is allowed out of the office is a mystery to me, it would seem a massive breach in security procedures, that allows a document to be signed out and transported by an individual outside of the secure area.
 
#16
I can't understand why classified documents, especially secret and above aren't tagged so they set an alarm off if they leave a secure area.
If someone needs to work at home they should have an encrypted link and download documents that way. To actually take files and documents on public transport, or even in private cars, must be the height of folly.
 
#17
Markintime said:
I can't understand why classified documents, especially secret and above aren't tagged so they set an alarm off if they leave a secure area.
If someone needs to work at home they should have an encrypted link and download documents that way. To actually take files and documents on public transport, or even in private cars, must be the height of folly.
It's because you are then tracking a tag not the document, the tag goes out the door ergo the document has too, the tag comes back, so has the document, or has it, no-one will know because the electronics will say it's back.
 
#18
bobthedog said:
Well by implication "Top Secret" implies that the information under that classification is potentially useful to those who would wish the state harm. Otherwise it could have been any of the other security classifications lower. Quite why something Top Secret is allowed out of the office is a mystery to me, it would seem a massive breach in security procedures, that allows a document to be signed out and transported by an individual outside of the secure area.
That was a Joke, right?
 
#19
No not a joke at all, I recall that certain government departments used to have the lunchtime menu's classified "Confidential" at one time. Abuse of documents isnt just involving their loss, occasionally documents are over classified, however I fully believe those of the highest classification should not leave their place of issue.

A fine of not much more than a months salary seems to be too lenient to prevent a recurrance.
 
#20
Markintime said:
If someone needs to work at home they should have an encrypted link and download documents that way. To actually take files and documents on public transport, or even in private cars, must be the height of folly.
Could be missing something, might very well be the case since I'm not all that technically literate, but unless they run secure fiber between the office and the house wouldn't that mean having to download them and have them transfered via the internet/public telephone lines?
 

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