Guiding kids away from the army...

#1
I've just heard that at a school whose CCF I was once associated, the head of careers has been ordered that in a presentation on careers to Y11 students (16 year-olds) he is not to mention the armed forces and especially not the army, as it is not deemed suitable, and girls don't want to hear about it.
I'm getting the Outrage out of the garage and hanging up the furry dice about now, and I'm wondering whether censoring careers advice in this way is legal anymore? Certainly advocating one course of education over another isn't.

Opinions on this fiendish plot to misguide youngsters from our noble profession welcome. Unfortunately I can't reveal too much about the school, otherwise they'll find me out and I'll be persona non grata for a while, and really they need some decent staff for their CCF.
 
#3
snot the school you ought to worry about really, more like every other phucker in the whole country seems to have an opinion. anyway, like you say, it's almost certainly the case that it is illegal to discriminate against this vocation in the way you said, so the chap/chapette concerned might just as well disregard said 'order' and preach the good word with impunity, i'd like to see the school tout that one at a tribunal.
 
#4
I don't even think it's the school's opinion; they have a well-supported CCF, have an annual Remembrance Sunday parade; the CCF biennial inspection is attended by the headmaster...I'm not connected to the school except as a casual assistant with the CCF, but there are some promising kids there, talking about joining respected regiments and corps and I wouldn't want to see them stuck in some office job because of some Guardian-reading junior staffer.
 
#5
Bravo_Zulu said:
I don't even think it's the school's opinion; they have a well-supported CCF, have an annual Remembrance Sunday parade; the CCF biennial inspection is attended by the headmaster...I'm not connected to the school except as a casual assistant with the CCF, but there are some promising kids there, talking about joining respected regiments and corps and I wouldn't want to see them stuck in some office job because of some Guardian-reading junior staffer.
And the fact that the Armed Forces are not mentioned by some hippy will negate these facts?
 
#6
The CCF has 45 committed members out of about 1500. The others, who didn't join, know little or nothing about what the armed forces offer like most of society. They should be entitled to advice.
The CCF is also not allowed to promote the army actively; it is a non-recruiting youth organisation. all it can do is hope kids enjoy it enough to sign on. It is the school's job to inform kids of different career paths, bursaries, all the technical stuff.
 
#7
Imagine if the volunteers dried up through lack of recognition and they started drafting these pupils into national service. I wonder whos fault that would be?
 
#8
Screw him man, the youth need to know that this brilliant men and women doing a brilliant job in diffrent theaters of war!! and they could/should be part of it! the more the merrier!
 
#11
Bravo_Zulu, the same thing happens at my school. Last year when there was a big careers day at Bassingbourne the Army offered to provide coaches and lunches for the kids. The school didn't even tell any of the pupils of the event.
 
#13
Not all schools are like this luckily, at my old school it would always be announced well in advance when any of the army, navy or RAF careers advisers would be coming and sign up sheets put on a couple of the notice boards. But then again our school has a lot of links to the armed forces with a few teachers having sons in it, a couple of the staff ex forces and the head master used to be a contingent commander in the CCF. Not to mention they're extremely supportive of anyone joining the TA.
 
#14
Undermine the system from within. Get Army recruiting posters and stick them on every single noticeboard.
 
#15
Bravo_Zulu said:
I've just heard that at a school whose CCF I was once associated, the head of careers has been ordered that in a presentation on careers to Y11 students (16 year-olds) he is not to mention the armed forces and especially not the army, as it is not deemed suitable, and girls don't want to hear about it.
I'm getting the Outrage out of the garage and hanging up the furry dice about now, and I'm wondering whether censoring careers advice in this way is legal anymore? Certainly advocating one course of education over another isn't.

Opinions on this fiendish plot to misguide youngsters from our noble profession welcome. Unfortunately I can't reveal too much about the school, otherwise they'll find me out and I'll be persona non grata for a while, and really they need some decent staff for their CCF.
Flamin` ell its changed a bit `aint it? When I was in my final year the careers bod says........

"what would you like to do when you leave?".

I say, "I`d like to be an graphic artist",

career man says.....

"have you thought of joining the army?".

I think he said that to every bugger he spoke to!
 
#16
The thing is of course that it is a careers Advice service not an Army recruiting Office. Given the state of the forces at this time , and going by the complaining that goes on on this site and in the newspaers, do you think that in all conscience a teacher could advise kids to join up? His job is to advise them on the career that offers them the best chance of a career that will give them a good standard of living. I know that no matter what a careers officer had told me I would have joined up anyway but at this time were my sons to consider it (They've both done a few years each) I would do everything I could to dissuade them.
 
#17
I like the poster idea; I'll nick a box of them and stick them up everywhere.
Craftmanx; the point is not to advocate the army, but to let them know it exists. Once youngsters are curious, the army can do its own recruiting campaign.

And to make it worse, the school's just sent me an email saying that due to complaints from people around the school, cadets shouldn't use cam cream on CCF evenings or carry rifles around near parents; it's too warlike and scares the naive urban mummies. FFS :x
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#18
Why don't you mention it to the local AFCIO and let them approach the head teacher. That way the school does not have to know where its coming from.
 
#19
Bravo_Zulu said:
I like the poster idea; I'll nick a box of them and stick them up everywhere.
Craftmanx; the point is not to advocate the army, but to let them know it exists. Once youngsters are curious, the army can do its own recruiting campaign.

And to make it worse, the school's just sent me an email saying that due to complaints from people around the school, cadets shouldn't use cam cream on CCF evenings or carry rifles around near parents; it's too warlike and scares the naive urban mummies. FFS :x
The school has no obligation to publicize the army, and I do not see why it is in any way wrong of a head teacher to decide that it doesn't want to encourage the army as a career.
 
#20
The CCF is also not allowed to promote the army actively; it is a non-recruiting youth organisation.
True, but slightly misleading. Both the ACF and CCF's have duties in regards to career guidance.

Specifically the CCF charter (which all schools sign up to if they want a CCF) commits the CCF contingent to
encourage those who have an interest in the services to become Officers of the Regular or Reserve Forces.
Similarly the ACF charter charges it with

c. Stimulating an interest in the Army, its achievements, skills and values.

d. Advising and preparing those considering a career in the Services or with the Reserve Forces.
The fact is that the school has a CCF. Most don't. In having one they are already giving their pupils more opportunity to find our about a service career than most schools do.

There is not enough time to have a presentation on every possible career or employer in any school, so some possible careers/employers will get left out. That is the way the cookie crumbles. The careers advisers can, and no doubt will, give service specific advice to anyone who asks for it. Meanwhile the CFF adults should be doing it for the cadets who show an interest in such a career.

I can't really see any reason for being outraged.
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top