Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Grunt Slang in Vietnam

Grunt Slang in Vietnam

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
When i joined they still called the new lads "nigs". Never bothered to find out what that actually means but i really doubt that anyone would dare say it in todays diversity and inclusion army. It's too close to Guy Gibson's dog's name for comfort.

I think it meant 'Nig nog Sprog' Nothing to do with the Diversified!
 
On the topic of stolen valor, it's interesting to note than a man who also wrote a lot on the Vietnam war, Shelby Stanton, was embroiled in one such scandal, having invented many parts of his biography and most of his medals.

Do a search with "Stanton" in the below pdf to get to the details of the accusations against him



Some of Stanton's books


View attachment 460343 View attachment 460344 View attachment 460345

View attachment 460346 View attachment 460347
Forty years I've been training for the next Balcony - have to be soon or I'll not be able.......
Balcony training.jpg
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
A good read about a Vietnam Huey pilot is Chickenhawk.

 
Last edited:
When i joined they still called the new lads "nigs". Never bothered to find out what that actually means but i really doubt that anyone would dare say it in todays diversity and inclusion army. It's too close to Guy Gibson's dog's name for comfort.

I may be way off track with this but given GI (government issue) as a long-standing and commonly-referenced term for US soldiers, could that be 'Not Issued by Government', ie, conscripts?
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
You might enjoy Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes in that case.

Officer in the USMC (Navy Cross, Bronze Star, two Navy Commendation Medals, two Purple Hearts, and 10 Air Medals.. Plus PTSD)
Fantastic book, one that is written from the heart. Saw him at the Edinburgh Book Festival and when the fireworks went off in the Castle he nearly jumped for cover. 50 years after and he still is affected by his experiences.

He talked about his breakdown when in a meeting in Singapore with Chinese/ Asia faces round the table all he could see was piles of smoking dead VC bodies. His friend had to take him out of the room. That event led to his writing Matterhorn. Really, really worth getting a copy and reading it, I doubt anyone would be sorry to do so.
 
Last edited:

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
Thanks old'un I love language and the different lexicons used by united groups. I remember when coming home on leave I was accused of talking like a jock and when i got back to my unit every was telling me that they had trouble understand my cockney cant . They were fazes when I joined the unit and was calling my Smudger a "shooter " and people i didn't like as "a slag "
I also recall that " you wouldn't fecking chuckle " was integrated into my civi friends dictionary. Although buckfeck never made it lol.
 
Thanks old'un I love language and the different lexicons used by united groups. I remember when coming home on leave I was accused of talking like a jock and when i got back to my unit every was telling me that they had trouble understand my cockney cant . They were fazes when I joined the unit and was calling my Smudger a "shooter " and people i didn't like as "a slag "
I also recall that " you wouldn't fecking chuckle " was integrated into my civi friends dictionary. Although buckfeck never made it lol.

"Slag" in reference to a male is Cockerney gay gangster slang.

Unmitigated terror prevents me from being more specific and naming the Cockerny gangsters.
 
One of, if not the first, song I was exposed to, on putting on a baggy green skin, from Vietnam vets still serving in my unit more than 10 years later.

'Uc-da-loi, Cheap Charlie,
He no buy me Saigon tea,
Saigon tea costs many many P,
Uc-da-loi he Cheap Charlie.'
 
The mis-romanized choggie is actually Korean, not derived from the A-frame. The author's research is apparent shite.

It is actually 저기 (cheogi, with yo sound in the middle and long e sound at the end) and it literally means "over there," usually used in the phrase 가다 저기 (kata cheogi) by GIs to say it is time to move out, literally meaning "go over there." Romanization of Korean has changed a bit in the last few decades and it technically should be written gada jeogi now.

As an aside, 여기 (yeogi, sounds like the cartoon bear) means "over here."
 
The mis-romanized choggie is actually Korean, not derived from the A-frame. The author's research is apparent shite.

It is actually 저기 (chogi, with long o and long e sound) and it literally means "over there," usually used in the phrase 가다 저기 (kata chogi) by GIs to say it is time to move out, literally meaning "go over there." Romanization of Korean has changed a bit in the last few decades and it technically should be written gada jogi now.

Yep, should be Nogs, Noggies, Dinks or Nigel.

'Crashing through the J,
In a clapped out APC,
Watching all the Nogs,
Shooting back at me.

'Rat, tat, tat, rat, tat, tat,
How I love to be
a proud and serving member of
the Royal Aust Infantry.'
 
Yep, should be Nogs, Noggies, Dinks or Nigel.

한국어 (han guk eo) means Korean

미국 사람 (mi guk saram) means American

영국인 (yeong guk in) means British

Notice the common guk in each? Basically it means "person" in this context, and is from where the slur "gook" is derived.

We are all "gook."
 
한국어 (han guk eo) means Korean

미국 사람 (mi guk saram) means American

영국인 (yeong guk in) means British

Notice the common guk in each? Basically it means "person" in this context, and is from where the slur "gook" is derived.

We are all "gook."
But some of us are outside the wire.
 
One of, if not the first, song I was exposed to, on putting on a baggy green skin, from Vietnam vets still serving in my unit more than 10 years later.

'Uc-da-loi, Cheap Charlie,
He no buy me Saigon tea,
Saigon tea costs many many P,
Uc-da-loi he Cheap Charlie.'

How about the full version, which consists of yours plus this.

Tan ta Lun number one,
He go awol just for fun,
He buy me many many tea,
He no cheap charlie.

By all accounts, Uc-da-loi translated to the big red rat, which was the kangaroo painted on their vehicles.
Tan ta lan equaled to the little fat duck painted on the NZ vehicles, being the kiwi.
 
How about the full version, which consists of yours plus this.

Tan ta Lun number one,
He go awol just for fun,
He buy me many many tea,
He no cheap charlie.

By all accounts, Uc-da-loi translated to the big red rat, which was the kangaroo painted on their vehicles.
Tan ta lan equaled to the little fat duck painted on the NZ vehicles, being the kiwi.

Kiwi sub-units were integrated into the ATF, and particularly their arty did a sterling job. At the end of the day though, Kiwis and Aussies have as much in common as Poms and Jocks (and you can take that any way you like).
 
Last edited:
Kiwi units were integrated into the TF, and particularly their arty did a sterling job. At the end of the day though, Kiwis and Aussies have as much in common as Poms and Jocks (and you can take that any way you like).

You will get no argument from me over that statement.
Definitely having a common purpose with entirely different attitudes.
 

Dalef65

Old-Salt
They called their new recruits FNGs Fecking new guy! We called ours in Borneo YPs Young personel ; a difference in cultures displayed there!

In the same vein, in WW2, the US soldiers at the front called their BCRs "repple depples". Which I believe comes from replenishment deployment or something.

Again, a difference in culture is displayed, as (so the story goes), no one would speak to the new arrivals.
 
When i joined they still called the new lads "nigs". Never bothered to find out what that actually means but i really doubt that anyone would dare say it in todays diversity and inclusion army. It's too close to Guy Gibson's dog's name for comfort.
I was told it stood for, New Intake Group.
 

Latest Threads

Top