Grenada elects to keep Queen

#1
#8
Well done your Maj, get yourself on X Factor with a public vote percentage like that!
 
#11
Er sorry, Grenada is Grenada. This is another country, St Vincent and the Grenadines .....

but Huzzah and all that.

Anyone see that programme the other week where Kwame Kwei-Armah traced the royal tour of 1953.

He was shocked when he found a radio studio full of Jamicans saying "we should have stayed with the British, it would have been better for us in the long run" and how much they liked the queen.

It shouldn't be a surprise really. Once you get beyond the headlines most carribbean communities are conservative and traditional.

Trotsky

#
 
#13
A few more dozen plane loads and I reckon we can swing the aussie referendum.

Bloody antipodeans (spelling? - camping and drinking in SE Queensland).
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#14
Good for them - they are obviously civilised enough to know when they are on to a good thing, unlike the rest of the ungrateful world and a chunk of the population here.

Love this report about how they went about things:

Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves and his Unity Labour Party (ULP) campaigned heavily for the "Yes" vote,[4] Gonsalves advocating that, though he had nothing personally against Queen Elizabeth II, he believed it was time for Saint Vincent to stop having a monarch as its head of state; he offered the opinion: "I find it a bit of a Nancy story that the Queen of England [sic] can really be the Queen of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines."[2] Though he had earlier shown affinity towards executive presidents Hugo Chávez and Fidel Castro,[5] Gonsalves asserted that the proposed constitution for Saint Vincent and the Grenadines would not have created such a presidential post; the Prime Minister argued that an executive presidency would give the office holder too much power in the small country. In an interview with the Trinidad and Tobago Express, he stated that type of presidency "may well make perfect sense" for the neighbouring country of Trinidad and Tobago, but such a government would not work in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, saying further: "it is our assessment that to conjoin the power of a prime minister with the power of a head of state, head of government, or head of state in our circumstances, that is a matter which will end up making that office holder more powerful than the current situation."[2]

The Loyal Opposition, led by the New Democratic Party (NDP), advocated for a "No" vote on the proposals, holding the position that the proposed constitution would neither reduce the power of the Prime Minister nor strengthen the country's democracy.[4] The NDP's leader, Arnhim Eustace, opined that the Gonsalves government and opposition parties had not come to an agreement on a number of fundamental issues, including the Integrity Commission, the Human Rights Commission, the Ombudsman, and the Electoral and Boundaries Commission.[4]
That is very civilised.

Imagine how that might have turned out if, perhaps they'd got themselves completely free of their colonial oppressahs, like say, in Zimbabwe, or perhaps even Uganda, and how the news of democratic change might have read.
 
#16
flipflop said:
Well done Grenada. I wish that we could be given the opportunity to elect our head of state.
You want to vote for the Queen?

Aprpos of nothing, does anyone know what the economic position of StV&G is re: UK government contributions?
 
#17
Bloody hell. When I read the headline I thought this was the hostage drama to end all hostage dramas. Bloody Somalian pirates. Giving others ideas.
 
#18
smartascarrots said:
flipflop said:
Well done Grenada. I wish that we could be given the opportunity to elect our head of state.
You want to vote for the Queen?

Aprpos of nothing, does anyone know what the economic position of StV&G is re: UK government contributions?
I think we should have the opportunity to vote for The Queen, say every 10 years. I have no doubt she would be confirmed without any problem. It would, however, add more legitimacy to the idea of constitutional monarchy and, dare I say, it would also keep the royals a little more aware of public thinking (eg on matters such as royal taxes).
 
#19
Booty said:
smartascarrots said:
flipflop said:
Well done Grenada. I wish that we could be given the opportunity to elect our head of state.
You want to vote for the Queen?

Aprpos of nothing, does anyone know what the economic position of StV&G is re: UK government contributions?
I think we should have the opportunity to vote for The Queen, say every 10 years. I have no doubt she would be confirmed without any problem. It would, however, add more legitimacy to the idea of constitutional monarchy and, dare I say, it would also keep the royals a little more aware of public thinking (eg on matters such as royal taxes).
Are you for real?
 

Command_doh

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
Booty said:
smartascarrots said:
flipflop said:
Well done Grenada. I wish that we could be given the opportunity to elect our head of state.
You want to vote for the Queen?

Aprpos of nothing, does anyone know what the economic position of StV&G is re: UK government contributions?
I think we should have the opportunity to vote for The Queen, say every 10 years. I have no doubt she would be confirmed without any problem. It would, however, add more legitimacy to the idea of constitutional monarchy and, dare I say, it would also keep the royals a little more aware of public thinking (eg on matters such as royal taxes).
Can someone show me a more absurd idea that's been put out in recent times? I am scratching my head in vain trying to think of one.
 

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