Greatest Living Briton

#1
David Attenborough.


No competition.

(Oh, OK, I've just seen the hours' worth on him by Palin, but after many years' worth of admiration the opinion stands.)
 
#3
Margaret Thatcher.....not a popular choice I will admit!

She took a country heading to 3rd world status, crippled by the Trade Unions and gave it a a long and admittedly painful talking too. She put the country straight and left a theory of Politic now emulated (to some degree) by the Great Fraud. She was a woman of principle and tremendous moral courage if something needed fixing because it was wrong, she fixed it.

More if its needed. :wink:
 
#4
You've got me thinking WB... - yep, he's a good choice, can't think of anyone better
 
#6
Letterwritingman said:
Margaret Thatcher.....not a popular choice I will admit!

She took a country heading to 3rd world status, crippled by the Trade Unions and gave it a a long and admittedly painful talking too. She put the country straight and left a theory of Politic now emulated (to some degree) by the Great Fraud. She was a woman of principle and tremendous moral courage if something needed fixing because it was wrong, she fixed it.

More if its needed. :wink:
Contrast her principle and courage of every kind with the moveable feast that is NuLab...

Contender, definitely.
 
#7
Sorry, really should have expanded on my choice.

Attenborough is brilliant. He can take a team, lead, manage and administrate them, enthuse them with the project he's dreamt up and produce a world-beating product from their efforts time after time after time, over decades. His charm, honesty and professional ability are a shining light to every botanist, biologist, zoologist and human who sees the results of his labours.

He renounced a sparkling career in the executive management of British broadcasting for his calling, yet while he was there he changed the way the BBC operated to make it the finest example of its' type in the world. Would that the very much lesser men who followed were able to do the same.

He inspired me to pay attention to the world I was living in, to try to understand the lives and habits of the wildlife which previously in wilder parts of the world I had only regarded as meat or nuisance, the birds I had only thought of as the early morning wakeup call and the flora I had little thought for at all.

His encounters with penguins, gorillas and bower birds will stay with me forever. Outstanding in every way.

Number 1.
 
#10
I would have to say Stephen Hawking

Stephen William Hawking was born on 8 January 1942 (300 years after the death of Galileo) in Oxford, England. His parents' house was in north London, but during the second world war Oxford was considered a safer place to have babies. When he was eight, his family moved to St Albans, a town about 20 miles north of London. At eleven Stephen went to St Albans School, and then on to University College, Oxford, his father's old college. Stephen wanted to do Mathematics, although his father would have preferred medicine. Mathematics was not available at University College, so he did Physics instead. After three years and not very much work he was awarded a first class honours degree in Natural Science.

Stephen then went on to Cambridge to do research in Cosmology, there being no-one working in that area in Oxford at the time. His supervisor was Denis Sciama, although he had hoped to get Fred Hoyle who was working in Cambridge. After gaining his Ph.D. he became first a Research Fellow, and later on a Professorial Fellow at Gonville and Caius College. After leaving the Institute of Astronomy in 1973 Stephen came to the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, and since 1979 has held the post of Lucasian Professor of Mathematics. The chair was founded in 1663 with money left in the will of the Reverend Henry Lucas, who had been the Member of Parliament for the University. It was first held by Isaac Barrow, and then in 1669 by Isaac Newton.

Stephen Hawking has worked on the basic laws which govern the universe. With Roger Penrose he showed that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied space and time would have a beginning in the Big Bang and an end in black holes. These results indicated it was necessary to unify General Relativity with Quantum Theory, the other great Scientific development of the first half of the 20th Century. One consequence of such a unification that he discovered was that black holes should not be completely black, but should emit radiation and eventually evaporate and disappear. Another conjecture is that the universe has no edge or boundary in imaginary time. This would imply that the way the universe began was completely determined by the laws of science.

His many publications include The Large Scale Structure of Spacetime with G F R Ellis, General Relativity: An Einstein Centenary Survey, with W Israel, and 300 Years of Gravity, with W Israel. Stephen Hawking has three popular books published; his best seller A Brief History of Time, Black Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays and most recently in 2001, The Universe in a Nutshell. There are .pdf and .ps versions of his full publication list.

Professor Hawking has twelve honorary degrees, was awarded the CBE in 1982, and was made a Companion of Honour in 1989. He is the recipient of many awards, medals and prizes and is a Fellow of The Royal Society and a Member of the US National Academy of Sciences.

Stephen Hawking continues to combine family life (he has three children and one grandchild), and his research into theoretical physics together with an extensive programme of travel and public lectures.
From


He has revolutionised the scientific community with his thinking, and to do that in his condition is something beyond remarkableHawking home site
 
#11
I would say that the two greatest men alive are those that created Lycra and Wonderbras, although poss not in that order. And that comes fromsomeone who can wear both :wink:
 
#14
bavmarda said:
Well, it could've been a Briton that invented them :) In that case, someone I know who is Briton, why not Shakespeare?

GREATEST 'LIVING BRITON' you mong!
 
#15
Mmm. We're not getting Willy to meet Penelope in this endeavour yet.

Let's wind the old underpants up the flagpole with the words: "Living Briton" emblazoned thereon.

"Living" is good: inspires wild sweating activity, while Briton has "King of Kings, Forever, and Ever Hallelulijah, Lord of Lords, For Ever and Ever, Hallelulijah" all over it.

Attenborough, Thatcher, QEII,....

Are you with me?
 
#16
bavmarda said:
Well, it could've been a Briton that invented them :) In that case, someone I know who is Briton, why not Shakespeare?
Nice try. Go to the corner of your room, rest head.
:D
 
#17
page one said it all for me.

The attenborough brothers (yes there was more than one), Magie Thatcher and QEII. Add Stephen Hawking, General Sir John Mogg (who) and that competes the lot.

JJ
 
#19
Sir Ranulph Fiennes OBE for me. I won't discuss Thatcher.
 

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