Great Grandfather WW1

Fang_Farrier

LE
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received_111852220187267.jpeg
received_2703501293020277.jpeg


Having seen some of the magic worked on here with partial details I thought I would make it easy for you by full service number and name.

I know from the certificate he served 1908 to 1930 in the Gordon Highlanders.

That's as much as I know about his service.
There was a family story that he was captured at Mons in August 1914 and spent the rest of the war as a POW.

Any information would be gratefully received.

As to the photo, is that the usual 1914, War and Victory medals?

Nice good conduct stripes. Looks like 4, so after 18years service but before he got his L/Cpl mentioned on the certificate.
Must have buggered up his pension to be promoted so close to his 22 year point!
 
A nice little memorial there, chap: if I've read it right, his name is 'A Love'?

If so, that's a good start-unfortunately, his service number not so much, as it is the 'new' issue post-WWI and very few of those pop up in the current data pool.

I'll have a look and see what pops up.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
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A nice little memorial there, chap: if I've read it right, his name is 'A Love'?

If so, that's a good start-unfortunately, his service number not so much, as it is the 'new' issue post-WWI and very few of those pop up in the current data pool.

I'll have a look and see what pops up.
Looks like an A to me too.

Am not sure of his name but son was Alec and not unusual for father and son to have same name in these parts.
 
There was a family story that he was captured at Mons in August 1914 and spent the rest of the war as a POW.
The Red Cross list doesn't have a Love.
 

Fang_Farrier

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My Great Uncle Ben served in the Middlesex Regiment in The First world war, he joined in 1914 to get away from a older woman he got up the duff, can't keep that from the Army, there's a chit from a General making him send a proportion of his pay to support the child, he left the army in 1919, always wondered how he made it through the entire European campaigne to the end. especially as he was PBI. He never spoke of it to the family. I have all the cap badges that made up the Queen's Regiment, the Buffs, Middlesex, East Surry, Sussex Regiment. The last lot called us the Lady Di's. I feel a link with him as our Regiments are linked in the worst of Army, the Amalgamation. Still a link is a link, and I'm going to frame the four Regimental cap badges together.
 
So not a POW then.

Interesting then that he spend the entire WW1 as a Private, no wound stripe though.
Not so fast, there . . . so far, I've found 2 x Ptes A Love in the Gordons. One was KIA in 1915 but this chap:

Pte A Love.png


DID go into the bag, probably quite early on. Note that his Regimental number is a low 166, signifying entry well before WWI.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
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Not so fast, there . . . so far, I've found 2 x Ptes A Love in the Gordons. One was KIA in 1915 but this chap:

View attachment 444334

DID go into the bag, probably quite early on. Note that his Regimental number is a low 166, signifying entry well before WWI.
Right initial and fits with family story.
Certificate has enlightenment as 1908, so well before WW1
 
A question: it says he left ‘the depot’, rather than a battalion. Does this mean he was recalled to the colours for the purpose of completing his discharge?
 

Fang_Farrier

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A question: it says he left ‘the depot’, rather than a battalion. Does this mean he was recalled to the colours for the purpose of completing his discharge?
No idea, the only information I have are these (and even then they are scans emailed to me by an aunt) and the story that he was captured at Mons.
May have worked in a salt mine in Silesia.

Might not an Old Soldier have been posted to a Depot for the last few years of service?
Storeman or the like?
Might explain his late promotion.
 

slick

LE
Given the date on the form in post #7, there`s a fair chance he was one of the Gordons who went into the bag at the battle of Le Cateau.
 
The more i look at Pte 166 A Love, the more I'm liking him as your man, F_F.

Here's a snippet from the separate Medal Roll for the British War Medal and Victory Medal (his 1914 Star having authorised in 1917, hence the early Roll):

Alexander LOVE.png


note that's the same chap from the 1914 Star Roll-and now, we have a first name.
 
Right initial and fits with family story.
Certificate has enlightenment as 1908, so well before WW1
At the risk of bring inappropriately facetious, I never realised that joining the Army meant becoming enlightened.
 

Fang_Farrier

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Interestingly that site states that the Gordon's reset their Regimental numbers back from a five figure number to a 3 figure in 1908, just before great grandfather enlisted.
 
You will find his Medal Card online at the National Archives. You can download it for a small fee - details at View attachment 444357
Ask and ye shall receive ( @Fang_Farrier ):

Alexander Love-MIC.jpg


Note also that there's an annotation for his LSGC from an Army Order dated 1927: that should hint that your photo of the old boy predates 1927.

The annotation 'Clasp and roses' relates to the so-called 'Old Contemptibles' clasp '5 August and 22 November 1914', the award of which passed into legend as the Mons Star. The rose worn on undress ribbons to signify the clasp.
 

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