Gratuitous car porn thread

Published by: Motoring Evolution, via Jaguar Enthusiasts' Club, on 29 August 2021.

JAGUAR XJ220 Daily Driven Supercar Review and Walkthrough 220mph 2021.

Hello and welcome to our channel debut. As it's now fast approaching the 30 year anniversary of the release of the Jaguar XJ220, we thought you might enjoy this rare opportunity to see an in depth review explaining the history behind this amazing machine, together with a first-hand account from the owner of what its like to own and drive the Jaguar XJ220 on a daily basis. Yes that's right this is a daily driven vehicle, also included within this content is an in depth walk-through of all the bells, whistles and little quirks the Jaguar XJ220 has to offer.

We would like to say a special Thank You to Spike (The owner of this Jaguar XJ220) for the privilege of allowing us this rare opportunity to visit him and make this content.

We would also like to shout out to all our fans and friends for watching this content and if you enjoyed this video and would like to see more please consider liking and subscribing so you don't miss out on future videos.

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1956 Rover 105R T3 gas turbine car prototype.

Rovers 3rd gas turbine car, the T3, was developed in 1956. Similar in its exterior design to the JET1, the T3 had , De Dion suspension at the rear and four-wheel drive.

Rover T3 Coupé, a revolutionary experimental car powered by a gas-turbine.

Rover’s third gas-turbine prototype had a rear-mounted 2S/100 turbine which rotated at up to a maximum of 52,000 rpm. Designed by Spencer King and Gordon Bashford, it also featured 4-wheel drive and was revealed at the Earls Court Motor Show.

All of the technology that was found in this car was then cloaked in this gorgeous blue glass-fiber, coupe body.

The glass-reinforced plastic body have a low bonnet line with a deep wrap-round windscreen and large rear window. The T3 also have four-wheel drive-a desirable safety factor on a car that had such a high torque to weight ratio.

“Air intakes the nose of the Rover T3 gas turbine car through the chromed intake to cool the front and rear brakes. The exhaust gases merge through the top of the tail (right) after they have passed through a heat exchanger and returned useful energy to the air entering the combustion chamber.”
The Motor, October 1956, London Show Report.

Many ideas from the T3, found their way into the popular Rover 2000 (P6) saloon. Things such as the De Dion suspension at the rear, coil suspension all round and four-wheeled disk brakes. Even though paraffin consumption was unbelievably high (13-14 MPG), the car was fairly practical as a road car but the high consumption is one reason why they didn't catch on.

 
1956 Rover 105R T3 gas turbine car prototype.

Rovers 3rd gas turbine car, the T3, was developed in 1956. Similar in its exterior design to the JET1, the T3 had , De Dion suspension at the rear and four-wheel drive.

Rover T3 Coupé, a revolutionary experimental car powered by a gas-turbine.

Rover’s third gas-turbine prototype had a rear-mounted 2S/100 turbine which rotated at up to a maximum of 52,000 rpm. Designed by Spencer King and Gordon Bashford, it also featured 4-wheel drive and was revealed at the Earls Court Motor Show.

All of the technology that was found in this car was then cloaked in this gorgeous blue glass-fiber, coupe body.

The glass-reinforced plastic body have a low bonnet line with a deep wrap-round windscreen and large rear window. The T3 also have four-wheel drive-a desirable safety factor on a car that had such a high torque to weight ratio.

“Air intakes the nose of the Rover T3 gas turbine car through the chromed intake to cool the front and rear brakes. The exhaust gases merge through the top of the tail (right) after they have passed through a heat exchanger and returned useful energy to the air entering the combustion chamber.”
The Motor, October 1956, London Show Report.

Many ideas from the T3, found their way into the popular Rover 2000 (P6) saloon. Things such as the De Dion suspension at the rear, coil suspension all round and four-wheeled disk brakes. Even though paraffin consumption was unbelievably high (13-14 MPG), the car was fairly practical as a road car but the high consumption is one reason why they didn't catch on.

As a child, JET1 was always one of the must sees in the Science Museum. Basically it’s was an open top auntie Rover 90. T3 didn’t really look much like it.
 

Bordon/hants

War Hero
This is how to aggressively drive a mk2 Escort . That noise , love a Millington Diamond
I have met / worked a bit with this guy for just one day, he is sadly departed (in 2015 after a hillclimb crash). We were at a Historic race at Donnington, lots of well heeled types with ex F1 transporters, F1 cars and teams of mechanics.

Simon and his mates had rocked up and pitched near us in a Twin axle transit and trailer, and his "workshop" seemed to be a small tent which was full of bricks of Guinness and stout!

He made a beeline for our Transporter (we were running 2 cars for a very Wealthy Dutch guy who has a huge collection of cars) and Simon was a roit from the moment we met, asking us to get the boss to let him just do a couple of laps in "that auld canoe" as he called it (1998 Tyrrell 026) so the Boss could see how fast it really could go.


We had a workshop and welders / lathe etc. in our transporter so I did a little job for him, he had seen inside so came across to ask a favour.

He had his little Lant / Ralt I think it was, which looked totally out of place as did he and his crew, There were mutterings from some of the establised types there as well when he got on track, it was a damp / wet race and he was all over Historic F1 cars with 3-4 times the power in his little tiddler , and exiting bends sideways which got lots of tut tutting as well.

Made the event for all our guys, a real underdog character who brought smiles to all of us if not the posher types.
 
1956 Rover 105R T3 gas turbine car prototype.

Rovers 3rd gas turbine car, the T3, was developed in 1956. Similar in its exterior design to the JET1, the T3 had , De Dion suspension at the rear and four-wheel drive.

Rover T3 Coupé, a revolutionary experimental car powered by a gas-turbine.

Rover’s third gas-turbine prototype had a rear-mounted 2S/100 turbine which rotated at up to a maximum of 52,000 rpm. Designed by Spencer King and Gordon Bashford, it also featured 4-wheel drive and was revealed at the Earls Court Motor Show.

All of the technology that was found in this car was then cloaked in this gorgeous blue glass-fiber, coupe body.

The glass-reinforced plastic body have a low bonnet line with a deep wrap-round windscreen and large rear window. The T3 also have four-wheel drive-a desirable safety factor on a car that had such a high torque to weight ratio.

“Air intakes the nose of the Rover T3 gas turbine car through the chromed intake to cool the front and rear brakes. The exhaust gases merge through the top of the tail (right) after they have passed through a heat exchanger and returned useful energy to the air entering the combustion chamber.”
The Motor, October 1956, London Show Report.

Many ideas from the T3, found their way into the popular Rover 2000 (P6) saloon. Things such as the De Dion suspension at the rear, coil suspension all round and four-wheeled disk brakes. Even though paraffin consumption was unbelievably high (13-14 MPG), the car was fairly practical as a road car but the high consumption is one reason why they didn't catch on.

Indeed, the other reason were issues to do with the dissipation of heat, because it’s not like a normal tailpipe. The emissions are blisteringly hot. But I believe the power units were later put into a Leyland product and was used commercially. It really does indicate the stupidity of those that shut Rover down. The innovation of that company was something else.
 
Indeed, the other reason were issues to do with the dissipation of heat, because it’s not like a normal tailpipe. The emissions are blisteringly hot. But I believe the power units were later put into a Leyland product and was used commercially. It really does indicate the stupidity of those that shut Rover down. The innovation of that company was something else.

Not sure how "commercial" it was, but it certainly got to the prototype/trials stage.

Plenty of stuff on-line including videos - the grey and gold truck is preserved in working order.

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Indeed, the other reason were issues to do with the dissipation of heat, because it’s not like a normal tailpipe. The emissions are blisteringly hot. But I believe the power units were later put into a Leyland product and was used commercially. It really does indicate the stupidity of those that shut Rover down. The innovation of that company was something else.
The power unit was tested in an "Ergonomic" cabbed artic' vehicle tractor-unit, but never reached production.

Fuel consumption aside, the power unit was so light, that it failed to provide any/sufficient weight over the tractor-unit's front axle, to enable it to steer. Approaching corners, the weight of the trailer would simply just push the whole vehicle straight-on.

Whilst just typing that, I wondered why they never trialed the engine in an eight-wheel rigid vehicle, which would have had more weight (from the payload), over the front axles?!
 
Not sure how "commercial" it was, but it certainly got to the prototype/trials stage.

Plenty of stuff on-line including videos - the grey and gold truck is preserved in working order.

View attachment 631557View attachment 631559View attachment 631560
The power unit was tested in an "Ergonomic" cabbed artic' vehicle tractor-unit, but never reached production.

Fuel consumption aside, the power unit was so light, that it failed to provide any/sufficient weight over the tractor-unit's front axle, to enable it to steer. Approaching corners, the weight of the trailer would simply just push the whole vehicle straight-on.

Whilst just typing that, I wondered why they never trialed the engine in an eight-wheel rigid vehicle, which would have had more weight (from the payload), over the front axles?!
hmm. The cabs were designed by David Bache and Tony Poole and were on the road, according to Graham Robson. Apparently after the "the merger" ( Rover Gas turbines were operated by Leyland). Seven prototypes were loaned to Leyland's fleet Customers and used the 2 Shaft 150R engines but they were later uprated to a new 400BHP unit. But he admits they were doomed by the 74 fuel crisis. a Mate of mine converted a 90 to look like a version of Jet 1 but in actuality was more of a throwback to Farina's attempt.
 
hmm. The cabs were designed by David Bache and Tony Poole and were on the road, according to Graham Robson. Apparently after the "the merger" ( Rover Gas turbines were operated by Leyland). Seven prototypes were loaned to Leyland's fleet Customers and used the 2 Shaft 150R engines but they were later uprated to a new 400BHP unit. But he admits they were doomed by the 74 fuel crisis. a Mate of mine converted a 90 to look like a version of Jet 1 but in actuality was more of a throwback to Farina's attempt.

Maybe not a coincidence the prototypes were operated by oil companies?

As RCT(V) says it was the standard 1960's "Ergo" cab with some new smooth panels. It still looks good today, IMHO.
 

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