Gratuitous car porn thread

Maybe of interest to the enthusiasts . . .?!

Originally published by: Tom Morgan, deputy digital editor, AUTOCAR magazine, on 22 December 2020.

TVR to begin Welsh factory renovations in January 2021.

Agreement reached with Welsh government for extensive redevelopment of Ebbw Vale site.

TVR has reached an agreement with the Welsh government to begin an extensive renovation programme on its Ebbw Vale factory early next year.

The reborn sports car brand will begin preliminary site works in January 2021, which will see the building's roof replaced, the structure recladded and extensive groundworks, in addition to the preparation of a prototype build area for the long-awaited Griffith supercar.

“This is a fantastic milestone in our mission to rejuvenate an iconic British brand, and we are all tremendously excited to witness the renovation of our new home in Ebbw Vale," TVR chairman Les Edgar said. "We have hundreds of faithful depositors worldwide who are patiently waiting to take delivery of their Griffiths, so today I hope they are just as delighted as we are."

Around 80 people are initially expected to be employed at the Ebbw Vale site once refurbishment works are completed, eventually expanding to 200 when Griffith production is fully ramped up.

Planning applications for the works were originally submitted in March, coinciding with the appointment of new CEO Jim Berriman, best known for his work at the Rover Group on the first Land Rover Freelander and Mk3 Range Rover.

Launching the Griffith is a key part of the firm's 18-month revival plan, revealed to Autocar earlier this year, which could also include a potential return to racing for the brand.

The front-engined, two-seater Griffith is set to use a highly strung version of Ford’s 5.0-litre V8 engine, and should produce around 500bhp. To date only one car has been road-registered, and is used for testing and event participation.

1609945995644.png
[photo: TVR wales factory current].

 
Maybe of interest to the enthusiasts . . .?!

Originally published by: Tom Morgan, deputy digital editor, AUTOCAR magazine, on 22 December 2020.

TVR to begin Welsh factory renovations in January 2021.

Agreement reached with Welsh government for extensive redevelopment of Ebbw Vale site.

TVR has reached an agreement with the Welsh government to begin an extensive renovation programme on its Ebbw Vale factory early next year.


The reborn sports car brand will begin preliminary site works in January 2021, which will see the building's roof replaced, the structure recladded and extensive groundworks, in addition to the preparation of a prototype build area for the long-awaited Griffith supercar.

“This is a fantastic milestone in our mission to rejuvenate an iconic British brand, and we are all tremendously excited to witness the renovation of our new home in Ebbw Vale," TVR chairman Les Edgar said. "We have hundreds of faithful depositors worldwide who are patiently waiting to take delivery of their Griffiths, so today I hope they are just as delighted as we are."

Around 80 people are initially expected to be employed at the Ebbw Vale site once refurbishment works are completed, eventually expanding to 200 when Griffith production is fully ramped up.

Planning applications for the works were originally submitted in March, coinciding with the appointment of new CEO Jim Berriman, best known for his work at the Rover Group on the first Land Rover Freelander and Mk3 Range Rover.

Launching the Griffith is a key part of the firm's 18-month revival plan, revealed to Autocar earlier this year, which could also include a potential return to racing for the brand.

The front-engined, two-seater Griffith is set to use a highly strung version of Ford’s 5.0-litre V8 engine, and should produce around 500bhp. To date only one car has been road-registered, and is used for testing and event participation.

View attachment 536575[photo: TVR wales factory current].

They finally taken my advice then :) , I had a Griffith 500 many years ago , very fast car and excellent handling however build quality / reliability was appalling , I had the engine rebuilt at less than 30k miles , TVR supplied the parts FOC as I made it clear I`d let the world know what a pile of crap they are if they didnt help out , I asked why they didnt use a production American V8 engine instead of the under developed junk they currently used ,it has to be British was the reply, they went bust a few years later.
 
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Published by: Felix Page, Autocar magazine, on 15 February 2021.

Electric Jaguar XJ scrapped as part of brand reinvention plan.

Long-awaited new flagship saloon won't form part of Jaguar's transition to an EV-only brand from 2025.

The long-awaited electric replacement for the Jaguar XJ has been written out of the company's long-term strategy as it looks to transition to an electric-only luxury brand from 2025.

According to Jaguar Land Rover's bold new Reimagine plan to transform the company's fortunes, Jaguar will undergo "a renaissance to emerge as a pure-electric luxury brand with a dramatically beautiful new portfolio of emotionally engaging designs and pioneering next-generation technologies".

The electric XJ - first previewed nearly two years ago and spotted several times in advanced road testing – "will not form part of the line-up".

JLR said: "Following a thorough technology review against the exponential change in the automotive industry, we concluded that the planned XJ replacement does not fit with our vision for a reimaged Jaguar brand.

"We have made the tough decision that it will not form part of the line-up, as the brand looks to realise its unique potential."

The Reimagine strategy does suggest that the XJ name could be retained for use on one of Jaguar's new exclusively electric models. The brand will use its own bespoke EV architecture, separate from the two new platforms planned for its Land Rover sister brand, as part of a move to give the two brands disparate personalities.

The news of the XJ's cancellation comes with the confirmation that JLR is "not discontinuing current products and does not plan to stop production of any present models early". However, Thierry Bolloré has confirmed that the Castle Bromwich facility, where it would have been produced, will be repurposed after the models currently in production are phased out. It has yet to be revealed what the plant will be used for instead.

Jaguar's new EV platform will be built alongside Land Rover's MLA architecture at JLR's Solihull production facility.

It's unknown whether Jaguar will seek to launch a flagship electric luxury saloon to replace the scrapped XJ, but it did note: "We are talking about vehicles which will be available from 2025 onwards, when the industry won’t necessarily be defined by the same segments."

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Published by: James Attwood, AUTOCAR magazine, on 15 February 2021.

Jaguar to become all-electric brand from 2025.

Every Jaguar and Land Rover car to receive electric variant by 2030, with separate EV platforms for each brand.

Jaguar will become an electric-only brand from 2025 onwards, as part of a bold new Reimagine strategy designed to revive the fortunes of Jaguar Land Rover (JLR).


New CEO Thierry Bolloré has set a target for the British firm, owned by the Indian Tata Motors group, to become a net-zero-carbon business by 2039, including a major shift to electrification. By the end of the decade, every Jaguar and Land Rover model will be offered with an electric-only version.

Bolloré said that there are currently no plans to close any manufacturing facilities.

All Jaguar and Land Rover models will be offered with an electric powertrain by the end of the decade, with Jaguar becoming an electric-only luxury brand from 2025 onwards.

Land Rover will launch six EV variants within the next five years, one of them the first all-electric Land Rover, due in 2024.

Bolloré said that the Reimagine plan was designed to emphasise “quality over volume”, with JLR aiming to become “the supplier of the most desirable vehicles for discerning customers”.

The two brands will be repositioned, with Jaguar becoming an electric-only firm and Land Rover retaining its off-road ethos but continuing its push upmarket. “Jaguar and Land Rover will have two clear unique personalities, rooted in their rich history to give two distinct choices for customers,” said Bolloré.

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Architectures and powertrains: three platforms, electric focus . . .
To support the electric transition, JLR will use three architectures: two dedicated to Land Rover and a new pure-BEV platform that will be exclusive to Jaguar, details of which will follow at a later data.

Future Land Rover models will be built on the Modular Longitudinal Architecture, which allows for combustion engine and EV models, and the “electric-biased” Electric Modular Architecture (EMA), which can also “support advanced electrified” combustion engines.

The firm says that the moving onto three platforms and consolidating the number of platforms and models produced per plant will help the firm to “establish new benchmark standards in efficient scale and quality for the luxury sector”.

It says that will be key to ensuring it can retain its UK and other worldwide plants (see below).
By the end of the decade, JLR is aiming for 100% of Jaguar sales and 60% of Land Rover sales to be fully electric. Bollore hinted that the future Jaguar Land Rover line-up would "feature a few less nameplates" as its focuses on its more popular models.

Bolloré also said the firm has committed to phasing out diesel powertrains by 2026 and is making a heavy investment in hydrogen fuel cell technology, with the firm’s first FCEV tech mules due to be running on public roads by the end of the year.

Jaguar . . . .
Jaguar presented the more pressing challenge for Bolloré, with sales dropping sharply in recent years due to its heavy reliance on saloons and diesel powertrains.

Bolloré said that the brand will undergo a “dramatic” transformation “to take a new luxurious position in the market to realise its unique potential not just for customers but the business as a whole”.

That will involve it becoming an electric-only firm with a focus on the high-end premium market – a plan that has been considered by JLR for some time, and could put the firm into competition with British brand Bentley, which has also committed to an electric-only future.

The switch is likely to involve a major repositioning of Jaguar, with future vehicles designed to attract future-thinking high-end customers. With the industry undergoing major changes due to electrification, such vehicles could take different forms from existing vehicles, and the use of a new bespoke architecture will assist in adopting a new philosophy.

Jaguar’s only electric car at the moment is the I-Pace SUV, but the firm had been working on a new electric-only XJ saloon that it has released teaser images of (below). However, Bolloré has confirmed that model has been scrapped, with now on developing the new architecture that will be used to underpin every new, EV-only model from 2025 onwards. Bolloré did suggest that the XJ name could be retained for a future new model, though.

The decision to scrap the planed XJ likely reflects a desire to dramatically reposition Jaguar, and gives future vehicles a clean sheet to start from in pursuit of new, more affluent customers.

Bollore hinted that the revamped Jaguar is also likely to move away from SUV-style vehicles, saying that "Land Rover would be the SUVs”, adding that the number of Jaguar SUVs competing for market share with Land Rover products was part of the reason for its brand shift. Ensuring that future Jaguar models are built on a separate platform from Land Rover machines is likely intended to help move the brands further apart.

Bollore also didn't rule out the prospect of an electric Jaguar sports car, saying that "it was an important question, and we are looking at it carefully.”

Land Rover . . . .
Land Rover will continue to offer a range of powertrains, but with a heavy focus on electrification. That will include six pure electric variants in the next five years as part of the existing Range Rover, Discovery and Defender families.

The brand's first EV will arrive in 2024. Bolloré didn't offer any further details on what it would be, although again the timeline suggests that it won't be the EV that had been planned as a ‘twin’ of the XJ.

Launching an electric version of every Land Rover model by 2030 will put the firm in a strong position to meet the UK’s 2030 ban on all but a limited number of non-zero-emissions vehicles. But continuing to offer combustion-engined versions for the foreseeable future will also ensure that the brand can continue to offer cars in markets where its products are popular but EV infrastructure is less developed.

Manufacturing: ‘no plans’ to close facilities . . .
JLR says that it has no plans to close any of its “core manufacturing facilities” and will retain “our plant and assembly facilities in the home UK market and around the world".

It has also said that it won't discontinue any current products and “do not plan to stop production” of any existing models.
JLR's Solihull plant will be used to build Land Rovers on the MLA platform and Jaguar models on the new BEV platform, while the Hailwood facility will be used to build cars on the EMA architecture.

The future of the Castle Bromwich site is less clear, with Bolloré saying: “First we will continue production of our existing nameplates built there to the end of their lifecycle. Then we will explore opportunities to refurbish the plant, which could benefit from the consolidation of businesses scattered across the Midlands.”

The business transformation . . . .
Bolloré highlighted JLR's recent financial results as showing that the firm has a “strong foundation” to build from and suggested that the Reimagine plan will help to “right-size, repurpose and reorganise” it into a more agile operation.

That will involve the implementation of a flatter management structure and a reduction and rationalisation of “non-manufacturing infrastructure” in the UK. As part of that, JLR’s Gaydon facility will become the sole home of the company's management team.

JLR said it will commit £2.5 billion annually into investment in electrification technology and connected services, including a continued investment in its Pivotal subscription model.

It will also work closely with its Tata Group parent firm on new technology. Bolloré highlighted that opportunity for collaboration as “a unique opportunity”, adding: “Others have to rely solely on external partnerships and compromise, but we have frictionless access that will allow us to lean forward with confidence and at speed.”

The aim is for JLR to achieve positive cashflow net of debt by 2025, with the ultimate target to become “one of the most profitably luxury manufacturers in the world”.


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Published by: James Attwood, digital editor, AUTOCAR magazie, on 01 March 2021.

Jaguar seeking partners for new EV platform, confirms boss.

Thierry Bolloré says talks ongoing with several firms over new platform for brand's luxury EV reinvention.

Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) boss Thierry Bolloré has confirmed that the firm is aiming to find a partner to help develop a new EV platform that will underpin Jaguar's reinvention as an electric-only luxury brand.

The transformation of Jaguar into an electric-only rival to Aston Martin and Bentley is a key part of Bolloré's Reimagine strategy to revive the fortunes of the British firm.


Under that plan, Jaguar will go electric-only from 2025 onwards, with all of its models built on a dedicated EV platform for luxury cars. Land Rover, meanwhile, will use two different platforms and offer a mix of powertrains.

With the high cost of developing a new vehicle architecture, it had been expected that JLR would look for a partner, either to buy a platform from or to share the development costs with.

Bolloré confirmed that plan during an investor presentation, stating that JLR is in talks with "a selection of actors" with a "massive appetite" to work with the firm.

He added that the choice of partner would be determined by the design of future Jaguar models, saying that any platform will have to "respect the proportions" of the firm's concepts.

Bolloré did say that, if a suitable platform supplier can't be found, the firm is prepared to develop the new platform itself. If that happens, he added, the process will be "design-led". He said: "There's no point doing what we are doing with Jaguar unless these products are drop-dead gorgeous."

JLR design chief Gerry McGovern added: "Great design begins with volume of proportions, and Jaguars will have significantly different volumes of proportion compared to Land Rovers.

(NOTE: This is the first time that JLR design chief Gerry McGovern, has been ALLOWED to speak to the press, since Thierry Bolloré took-over as boss of JLR).

"We need to look for opportunities out there in terms of architectures that we could utilise or refine to give the stunning jaw-dropping Jaguars I’m talking about.”

The decision to push Jaguar upmarket to a premium market position will involve lowering the brand's total sales volume. JLR is aiming to lower its overall production capacity by around 25% over the next five years ( . . . WHY ?!).

In an investor presentation, JLR said that the target group for the future EV-only Jaguar brand is a "wealthier, younger, urban, creatively minded group".

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Bluenose2

Old-Salt
I do like the look of the Renault.... but a 2nd hand Porsche Cayman is where I'd spend my own £

Agree - I keep coming back to Porkers (now on my 5th). My only reticence would be that the newer the Porsche, the less 'feel' they have, and I wouldn't have a 4-pot 718 at any price.

981 'S' in Sapphire blue, PSE, PASM and 20in is a terrific looking thing though.
 
Exactly the kind of questions I've been asking myself, since the original announcement a couple of days ago . . . :) !!

Published by: Jim Holder, AUTOCAR magazine, on 01 March 2021.

Inside the industry: Can Bollore really Reimagine JLR?

Thierry's first public outing as Jaguar Land Rover CEO was exciting but still leaves questions unanswered.

So large was the recent explosion of news detonated by Jaguar Land Rover that the boom is still resonating. While lots was revealed in Thierry Bolloré’s first public outing as JLR CEO, here are some of the questions that we feel still need answers.

Why cancel the new Jaguar XJ, nigh-on complete at an estimated investment cost of at least £300 million, when it was set to be exactly the type of car that Jaguar will sell from 2025? Bolloré claimed “the XJ replacement was not fitting with that new positioning,” which is odd, given that it looked like the perfect car for leading the firm to where it wants to go.


Why does Bolloré feel the need to put Jaguar and Land Rover cars onto individual platforms? He claimed that this is to give each brand distinct characteristics, but other car makers are happy achieving that using the same basic architecture. What makes this potentially hugely expensive separation necessary? Already rumours suggest it might be one way of disentangling the brands in case the opportunity to sell Jaguar – perhaps to an emergent Chinese company – comes up.

Does Jaguar even have the time or finances to develop its own platform by 2025?
As Bolloré hinted, the work can’t even begin until JLR design chief Gerry McGovern and the Jaguar team led by Julian Thomson have set the proportions they want the entire future line-up to work to. That’s a lot to do in just five years. Could it be that a joint venture with another car maker is on the cards or that a platform could be bought from a third-party supplier, such as Magna Steyr?

What kind of new cars will Jaguar make? Bolloré suggested Land Rover will be JLR’s SUV brand (and the rumours of a Jaguar J-Pace seven-seater have already been culled as a result), while saloon and estate sales are rapidly diminishing. So where is left for this new-look Jaguar to turn?

Does Jaguar have the marketing prowess and resources to transition from a premium brand to a luxury brand, as has been targeted? It’s all very well hinting at Aston Martin- and Bentleyesque qualities and price points, but surely that’s a stretch of reality? Maybe the mid-ground – exemplified perhaps by Maserati – is more realistic, albeit low on successful case studies to draw inspiration from. Why can Jaguar succeed in this space when others haven’t?

Can Jaguar actually make it to 2025? Last year’s sales were dire: 37% down year on year to 102,494 (BMW sold more 3 Series alone). Now retailers are presumably left to shift updated but ageing products that their creators have declared not fit for purpose from 2025. That’s four to five years of hard graft for them, followed by the prospect of reinvesting (again) in a completely fresh start. It’s a huge ask to persuade them to buy into that vision, given the historically low returns.

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Bluenose2

Old-Salt
Exactly the kind of questions I've been asking myself, since the original announcement a couple of days ago . . . :) !!

Published by: Jim Holder, AUTOCAR magazine, on 01 March 2021.

Inside the industry: Can Bollore really Reimagine JLR?

Thierry's first public outing as Jaguar Land Rover CEO was exciting but still leaves questions unanswered.

So large was the recent explosion of news detonated by Jaguar Land Rover that the boom is still resonating. While lots was revealed in Thierry Bolloré’s first public outing as JLR CEO, here are some of the questions that we feel still need answers.

Why cancel the new Jaguar XJ, nigh-on complete at an estimated investment cost of at least £300 million, when it was set to be exactly the type of car that Jaguar will sell from 2025? Bolloré claimed “the XJ replacement was not fitting with that new positioning,” which is odd, given that it looked like the perfect car for leading the firm to where it wants to go.


Why does Bolloré feel the need to put Jaguar and Land Rover cars onto individual platforms? He claimed that this is to give each brand distinct characteristics, but other car makers are happy achieving that using the same basic architecture. What makes this potentially hugely expensive separation necessary? Already rumours suggest it might be one way of disentangling the brands in case the opportunity to sell Jaguar – perhaps to an emergent Chinese company – comes up.

Does Jaguar even have the time or finances to develop its own platform by 2025?
As Bolloré hinted, the work can’t even begin until JLR design chief Gerry McGovern and the Jaguar team led by Julian Thomson have set the proportions they want the entire future line-up to work to. That’s a lot to do in just five years. Could it be that a joint venture with another car maker is on the cards or that a platform could be bought from a third-party supplier, such as Magna Steyr?

What kind of new cars will Jaguar make? Bolloré suggested Land Rover will be JLR’s SUV brand (and the rumours of a Jaguar J-Pace seven-seater have already been culled as a result), while saloon and estate sales are rapidly diminishing. So where is left for this new-look Jaguar to turn?

Does Jaguar have the marketing prowess and resources to transition from a premium brand to a luxury brand, as has been targeted? It’s all very well hinting at Aston Martin- and Bentleyesque qualities and price points, but surely that’s a stretch of reality? Maybe the mid-ground – exemplified perhaps by Maserati – is more realistic, albeit low on successful case studies to draw inspiration from. Why can Jaguar succeed in this space when others haven’t?

Can Jaguar actually make it to 2025? Last year’s sales were dire: 37% down year on year to 102,494 (BMW sold more 3 Series alone). Now retailers are presumably left to shift updated but ageing products that their creators have declared not fit for purpose from 2025. That’s four to five years of hard graft for them, followed by the prospect of reinvesting (again) in a completely fresh start. It’s a huge ask to persuade them to buy into that vision, given the historically low returns.

View attachment 553578


Traditionally, i'd have said that JLR's biggest barrier to a more upmarket brand was simply the integrity (or lack of) of their engineering.

Too often, their vehicles were brilliantly conceived (XJ, Disco 4, Range Rovers) but poorly executed. That is completely intolerable in the luxury market - no-one in those economic circles wants to drive around in something seen as being second or third-best.

I think it is only in the last couple of years where perhaps they've started to shake that off in terms of their better products - i-Pace, F-Pace, new Defender etc - even if the reputation for flakiness remains in the US and EU markets.

However, if they're chasing the Chinese market then they may just be able to sidestep that situation due to their relative new-ness into that market.

On that point, about 5 years ago I worked with their overseas brand agency in Leamington Spa. They told me of the anecdote that when they launched JLR into China, the local market absolutely recoiled in horror of the 3-year warranty information on their ads. The local perspective was "you want me to pay all that money for something that might actually BREAK within 3 years?"...the idea that you even needed peace of mind in case something went wrong introduced an element of doubt into the minds of the potential buyer.

In terms of their product portfolio, I think JLR are borderline in terms of being able to position themselves as 'luxury', but their aggressive adoption of electrickery, and the quantum leap they've made with their infotainment in the last 12 months, does bode well for a bit of a 'reset'.

Steve Sutcliffe has just done a video review of the new F-Pace SVR on Autoexpress, and the interior of that think isn't a million miles from being properly 'luxury' even if it doesn't quite have the depth of quality of the likes of Bentley. That said, I think they are leagues above Aston.

Where JLR do well, is that they are very good at delivering a fairly elegant design without the faux pas of the likes of the Bentagya, 7-series grill etc.

The XJ has probably been a necessary casualty but I would imagine that a lot of the £300m development cost is re-usable in other platforms.
 
Always fancied this old "Gangster" style car. A rare Galloway made in Kirkcudbright mainly by women.
This one was on TV as Dr Snoddie's runabout in Dr Findley's Casebook.
 

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Always fancied this old "Gangster" style car. A rare Galloway made in Kirkcudbright mainly by women.
This one was on TV as Dr Snoddie's runabout in Dr Findley's Casebook.
I used to drive an old Rover 75 P3 wiv running boards back in the 70's MiL used to call it my gangster car cos you could stand on the running boards on the way to the shops. Then just hop off- when the cops weren't looking ;) LTO29 is still knocking around somewhere.
 
I used to drive an old Rover 75 P3 wiv running boards back in the 70's MiL used to call it my gangster car cos you could stand on the running boards on the way to the shops. Then just hop off- when the cops weren't looking ;) LTO29 is still knocking around somewhere.
Not really what you’d call car porn though. Unless you’re into granny porn.
 
Not really what you’d call car porn though. Unless you’re into granny porn.
OOOh I don't know, I mean the Yanks have learned how to destroy the clean lines of the originals for yonks now, lowered roof lines pearlescent paint flames all over the place, But just think if you could by a bespoke from your car dealership. something Like Malleieu car kits, I think they're still going. Packard straight 8 perhaps?
 
Not really what you’d call car porn though. Unless you’re into granny porn.
I'm more interested in that he wouldn't allow the MiL inside his car, and the only way that she could get to the shops, was by hanging-on to the outside of his car !! ;) .
 

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