Graphene - stronger than diamond, faster than silicone

#1
Hello chaps,

Some clever fellow at Manchester University has just won the Nobel Prize for this:

Andre Geim: Why graphene is the stuff of the future - physics-math - 05 October 2010 - New Scientist

Made in Blighty too! Albeit by some Russian chap. Apparently it's going to be the wonder product of the future, to be used in aircraft, computers etc and the lab sheet design is only one atom thick! Hopefully it may have an impact on the recession, tho I spose it'll take a few years to reach the market.

graphene, the single layers of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice that my colleagues and I first isolated in 2004. Graphene is stronger and stiffer than diamond, yet can be stretched by a quarter of its length, like rubber. Its surface area is the largest known for its weight.

Despite graphene's thinness it is impermeable to gases or liquids. It conducts heat and electricity better than copper, and can be made into transistors which are faster than those made from silicon.

It makes possible experiments with high-speed quantum particles that researchers at CERN near Geneva, Switzerland, can only dream of.
The soft, silvery-grey form of pure carbon found in pencils consists of stacked-up sheets of interlinked carbon atoms. Separate these sheets to obtain gossamer films of carbon just one atom thick and you have a material called graphene, whose properties mimic those of the exotic substances found in collapsed stars
Late last year, Geim's team discovered that the quasiparticles in graphene are like nothing ever seen in a conducting material. Amazingly, the quasiparticles behave as if they were electrons travelling close to the speed of light. Such fast-moving electrons are usually found only in extreme conditions where particles are accelerated to enormous speeds - for example, close to neutron stars or in the big bang.
Of these many intriguing structures, graphene is causing the biggest stir. This is partly because of its unusual combination of properties: its two-dimensional honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms combines fantastic electrical conductivity with a strength tens of times that of steel in a material that is transparent to visible light. Best of all, we have finally learned how to make it.


More info about the wonder product here:

Quantum weirdness on the end of your pencil - physics-math - 08 July 2006 - New Scientist

Welcome to the high-carbon future - tech - 27 November 2009 - New Scientist

DC
 
#2
I think the amazing part is that they got the thin layer by stripping them off with Sellotape! How low tech / cost effective can you get?
 
#3
Huge boost for the university....Noble prize recipients on staff does wonders.
 
#4
Think you mean Silicon - Silicone is used as a sealent and to make plastic tits.
 
#7
The soft, silvery-grey form of pure carbon found in pencils consists of stacked-up sheets of interlinked carbon atoms. Separate these sheets to obtain gossamer films of carbon just one atom thick and you have a material called graphene, whose properties mimic those of the exotic substances found in collapsed stars

In the case of Pete Doherty, that would be heroin then!
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
The soft, silvery-grey form of pure carbon found in pencils consists of stacked-up sheets of interlinked carbon atoms. Separate these sheets to obtain gossamer films of carbon just one atom thick and you have a material called graphene, whose properties mimic those of the exotic substances found in collapsed stars

In the case of Pete Doherty, that would be heroin then!
Class, pure class!
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
To put things in perspective - carbon comes from blown up or collapsed stars, so it's nothing clever.
 
#11
Biped and Drlligaf,

Thank you for bringing up this subject, I can now legitimately claim that I am actually revising for my OU Astronomy and Cosmology exam rather than wasting time reading Arrse.
 
#12
#15
Graphene - stretch a filament of the stuff between two points and do you have the perfect cutting tool?

Only, what would the two points be made of?

Or is Graphene the ultimate condom material?
 
#16
Huge boost for the university....Noble prize recipients on staff does wonders.
Right up to the point that another institution with more prestige, better labs, larger grants, etc., poaches him.

Just think, if we'd had the Points-Based Immigration system 10 years ago this discovery would probably have been made in the USA.
 
#17
So...him and his mate come over to Manchester ...see the Haçienda's closed....sit in the lab scribbling or doing brass rubbings with good quality drawing pencils taken during a raid on the lab's stationery cupboard. While discussing which is their favourite member of Happy Mondays and if they should re-form one of them lifts some graphite off with some Sellotape. One says "Eeer hold on son. That's made of collapsed stars that is." The other says "Oh aye, nice one. I'll send it to Nobel. Chuck us one o' them Jiffys."
In unison :"Sorted!"

Well I think that's what occured anyway m'lud.
I read somewhere that the scientists were waiting for a lab technician to become available and watched one take a sample of something with Sellotape (sorry, sticky tape...) as if the sample was a fingerprint. They realised that the method might have other uses, and the rest is history!

Litotes
 
#18
#19
Eh?

Wed Oct 06 17:23:38 BST 2010 by nobody
Google

its not 2d... its 1 atom thick

carry on

Only one public comment from New Scientist article on graphene and it smells of ARRSE.....who was it...come on we can stay here all night till somebody owns up.
 
#20
I am annoyed by this news:


BBC News - Graphene: Patent surge reveals global race


Just like Liquid Crystal Displays LCD screens, which were also a British invention, once again we're getting shat over by the USA, China and the rest of the world by our own damn invention:


Nationality Number of graphene patent publications
SOURCE: Q TANNOCK, CAMBRIDGEIP, 2013
Chinese entities
2,204
US entities
1,754
South Korean entities
1,160
United Kingdom entities
54



FFS!

BBC News - Graphene: Patent surge reveals global race

The US ranks second with 1,754 patents. The UK, which kickstarted the field with the original research back in 2004, has only 54 - of which 16 are held by Manchester University.

UK science minister David Willetts, who has identified graphene as a national research priority, said the figures show that "we need to raise our game"...

The chairman of CambridgeIP, Quentin Tannock, told the BBC: "There's incredible interest around the world - and from 2007 onwards we see a massive spike in filings all over the world particularly in the USA Asia and Europe."

But he warned that despite the British government's support, there was a serious risk that the UK may lose out.

"Britain has got a reputation for being very canny, having very good inventors, so the race isn't over.

"But my concern is that in Britain there isn't an appreciation of just how competitive the race for value in graphene is internationally, and just how focused and well-resourced our competitors are.

"And that leads to a risk that we might underinvest in graphene as an area and that therefore we might look back in 20 years' time with hindsight and say 'that was wonderful, we got a lot of value, but we didn't get as much as we should have done'."
 

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