Government summarise Englishness in 12 objects

#1
What do Punch and Judy, a cup of tea and the SS Empire Windrush have in common?

All are national icons that sum up the essence of England, a new government website claims today.

They are on a list of 12 "national treasures" that the website, set up with £1 million of taxpayers' money, claims should kick-start a debate on the designs, artworks and monuments that sum up the idea of "Englishness".


The creators hope to add 108 items to the list over the next year as a result of suggestions from the public and an advisory board. They will be reviewed every quarter.

"ICONS - A Portrait of England" is the brainchild of Culture Online, an offshoot of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

It is planned to extend the project to Wales, Scotland and possibly Ireland, if funding becomes available.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/mai...con09.xml&sSheet=/news/2006/01/09/ixhome.html
So far the list consists of

Stonehenge

Neolithic monument on Salisbury Plain. Possibly the oldest in England, and still considered sacred by many. Hundreds of people gather there every year to celebrate the summer solstice.

The Angel of the North

Instantly recognisable against the Tyneside skyline, Antony Gormley's creation is probably the country's most famous work of public modern art. Unveiled in 1998, it is seen by an estimated 90,000 people every day, either from the East Coast mainline railway or the A1.

Punch and Judy

Enduring puppet show. Not so long ago, no visit to the seaside was complete without seeing a Punch and Judy show.

SS Empire Windrush

Docked at Tilbury in Essex on June 22, 1948, bringing Caribbean men and women keen to visit England. Over the years "the Windrush generation" and their families have become integral to English society.

Holbein's portait of Henry VIII

A painting which defined one of England's most famous monarchs. The portrait has helped to determine how we think of the legendary Tudor king - assertive, temperamental and larger-than-life.

A cup of tea

Enjoyed across England but it didn't arrive here until the mid 17th century. The story of tea takes in many aspects of England's history, many of them unsavoury. It is the story of trade and clippers and empire, the story of medicine and hygiene and bone china.

The FA Cup

Back in the news with the third round matches this weekend, it is the most famous club competition in the world of football.

Alice in Wonderland

Probably the first real children's novel. Until Lewis Carroll came along, it was practically unheard of for a publisher to release a book that aimed to give pleasure and entertainment to children with no secret educational or moral motives.

The Routemaster Bus

World famous jump-on jump-off buses introduced in London in the 1950s. The desire for safer, more accessible public transport meant the arrival of shut-door, driver-only buses with the phasing out of Routemasters beginning in the 1980s, which was completed, on regular services, last year.

The King James Bible

The most famous English translation of the Scriptures began in 1604 at a meeting of bishops at Hampton Court, arranged by James I. It was published in 1611 and has been described as "the noblest monument of English prose".

The Spitfire

The most famous military aircraft ever made. The combination of a practical yet beautiful design with the skill and courage of the pilots make the Spitfire a powerful icon of wartime England.

Jerusalem

It is sung at the Last Night of the Proms and is the hymn of choice for the Women's Institute and English expatriates around the world. Based on William Blake's poem, which was inspired by the legend that Jesus accompanied Joseph of Arimathea to Glastonbury.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/mai...on109.xml&sSheet=/news/2006/01/09/ixhome.html
Ypur thoughts????
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#2
My regimental Cigarello case emblazoned with the motif of 2 Crossed Dead Frenchmen on a mound of Dead Frenchmen!
 
#3
Stonehenge

A broken monument that no one knows how it was built or what it was really for

The Angel of the North

A modern sculpture that you can only see when driving on the A1 and is rusty!

Punch and Judy

A puppet show that advocates intermarital violence and beating of children and endangered species!

SS Empire Windrush

Docked at Tilbury in Essex on June 22, 1948, bringing Caribbean men and women keen to visit England. Over the years "the Windrush generation" and their families have become integral to English society.

Mmm, will leave it alone!

Holbein's portait of Henry VIII

A paintinting that probably bears no comparison to the actual life, due to threats of death isf it didn't look good!

A cup of tea

Will leave this alone, though its not an "english drink" as its imported!!!!

The FA Cup

Again will leave alone, though rugby is the game of real men (and women)

Alice in Wonderland

Hmmm, ok, but what about Enid Blyton!

The Routemaster Bus

Isn't the big red bus being decommissioned?

The King James Bible

Arguably the biggest work of fiction since...... (long theological dicussion about why it doesn't match up to the original versions!!)

The Spitfire

Hmmm, yes, great aircraft. Nuff said!

Jerusalem

Another song, it is great, but about another fecking country!!!!!!
 
#4
Oh, if you didn't realise, i think the list is a load of tosh, bar the spitfire!!!
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#5
Jerusalem is meant to be an ideal, not a country although I know some people seem to building a foreign country in our Green and pleasant land..

I'd agree with The Spitfire,

How about the Works Of Shakespeare?

Stuart Pearce Scoring THAT penalty.

Gazza scoring THAT goal against Scotland.

Fish and Chips

A Pint and a Fight a great English night.

The Beatles

Corrupt Politicians
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#6
Surely the essence of Englishness is to be hated by all other nations, especially those close neighbours!
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#7
Two things we English do not tolerate.... Bigotry.... and foreigners!
 
#8
Fang_Farrier said:
Surely the essence of Englishness is to be hated by all other nations, especially those close neighbours!
That's been surpassed by being American :wink:
 
#9
Three words,.........

Winston Spencer Churchill.
 
#11
The ability to say your expensive meal is great to the waiter when in fact it is undercooked, badly presented and covered in pubic hair!!!
 
#12
Ive often wondered wat Lewis Carroll was under the influence of when he wrote the Alice books.
 
#13
The poem Jerusalem is about England. Blake being inspired by the myth that Jesus had accompanied Joseph of Arimathaea to England as a child. So the lines:
And did those feet in ancient time Walk upon England's mountains green.
And was the holy Lamb of God On England's pleasant pastures seen?


The poem is therefore an expression of Blake's desire that England be transformed into a steadfast 'Christian' country- i.e. a new Jersualem, he was quite unhappy with they way things were going in 18/19th century England and thought that the revolutionary atmosphere that pervaded europe was about to bring a new advent for man. . But really you would think that any self respecting English nationalist would know that!
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#14
Private_Pike said:
Three words,.........

Winston Spencer Churchill.
whose mother was American!
 
#15
Ah sweet memories, singing Jerusalem at the beginning and end of term assemblies at school, wondering "WTF is this about?"

It all makes sense now.... a rousing song, but didn't make me feel English though :lol:

edited for spacko spelling
 
#16
The Poems of Rupert Brooke and A.E Houseman.

These, in the day when heaven was falling,
The hour when Earth's foundations fled,
Followed their mercenary calling
And took their wages and are dead.
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#17
Castlreogh wrote:

The poem is therefore an expression of Blake's desire that England be transformed into a steadfast 'Christian' country- i.e. a new Jersualem, he was quite unhappy with they way things were going in 18/19th century England and thought that the revolutionary atmosphere that pervaded europe was about to bring a new advent for man. . But really you would think that any self respecting English nationalist would know that!

In other words, Jerusalem becomes the ideal I mentioned and given the way things are going, it is even more relevant now, than it was then.

Also:

Newcastle Brown Ale....
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#18
The Angel of the North? What an eye sore. It looks like the wreckage of an Irish Kamikazi.......wrong way in and way off target.
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#19
The Angel of The North is meant to represent the Industrial Heritage of the North East in which case the government should tear it down and move it overseas.....
 
#20
Herrenbloke said:
Castlreogh wrote:

The poem is therefore an expression of Blake's desire that England be transformed into a steadfast 'Christian' country- i.e. a new Jersualem, he was quite unhappy with they way things were going in 18/19th century England and thought that the revolutionary atmosphere that pervaded europe was about to bring a new advent for man. . But really you would think that any self respecting English nationalist would know that!

In other words, Jerusalem becomes the ideal I mentioned and given the way things are going, it is even more relevant now, than it was then.

Also:

Newcastle Brown Ale....
Blake believed in sexual and racial equality - See the work All Religions are One
 

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