Gosport Inquiry

#1
I have searched and cannot find any other thread

Possibly 600 lives hastened in Gosport War Memorial Hospital

This could outdo Shipman

1991, Anita Tubbritt, a staff nurse working nights on an elderly ward at the Gosport War Memorial Hospital in Hampshire, asked to have a quiet word with her local union representative.
Mrs Tubbritt, along with a number of her colleagues, had become concerned over the way medical heroin was being administered to patients, who in their opinion did not require it.
On Wednesday, more than 27 years later, those concerns were finally acknowledged, when an independent inquiry concluded that more than 650 patients’ lives could have been prematurely

Lives shortened

Gosport Inquiry



Archie
 
#3
Was it just bad practice or did they mean to kill patients ?
That is the question but for bad practice to continue for over a couple of decades is astonishing

My view is until there is a professional investigation with regards to intent, I think that this is another Shipman

Archie
 
#4
My gran was at home dying of womb cancer and suffering in the extreme. She was helped on her way in the 1970's by a sympathetic doctor who had a word first with my parents.

Recently my fathr in law was also dying of cancer and the decision was taken to "withdraw" hydration and he was passing slowly and suffering. We had a word with the duty consultant who knew father in law and his medication was increased to ease the pain an within an hour FiL ad passed.

Not pleaseant however it was easing the inevitavble.

This really seems t be another doctor making unilateral decisions on her own patch an what's worse, a regime of cover ups an intimidation. I don't believe in drawn out inquiries that finish with "lessons will be learned, now lets move on" but in this case something seems to be awfully wrong and it seems the medical profession (or is it now a trade!) have a lot of questions to answer.
 
#6
For me there are 2 sides to this, the way it has been covered up and the way it was administered seems to be manslaughter at minimum and murder at the most.

However, IF we had a decent End of Life law allowing patients to specify how and when they want treatment withdrawn or they would wish to take their own life to end their own suffering would stories and situations like this become a thing of the past.

It is not right for any medical professional in any capacity to decide who should live or who should die, that is taking the God complex to a whole new level.
 
#7
Was it just bad practice or did they mean to kill patients ?
Negligence or murder then - Both.

To start with it’s probably negligence, but nurses questioned the practice and were fobbed off. To continue after that shows the docs were aware of the consequences and therefore acted with malice aforethought, making it murder.

They’ll probably get off with a parking fine.
 
#9
Well from a lot of the surviving relatives appearing on the media, their relatives was not in the final stages of some terrible illness, indeed some were saying that they were perfectly fit and healthy and went in for some respite

Prescribing opiates when not required - I cannot see that being explained away

One old fella actually told his visitors "get me out of here they are killing me and giving me morphine

Still TM PM if going to make us all pay extra taxes so that the NHS can continue its good work, maybe reduce the core issue as we are consonantly told "To many old people"

Archie
 
#14
Amazing that OAP's can be put down like dogs at a vets and no one seem to care, if this had happened elsewhere in the world you can be sure Britain would stick its hypocritical nose of condersation in, it reminds of the other hospitals around the country were pensioners were having the choice between drinking out of flower vases or actually dying of thirst.
 
#15
Negligence or murder then - Both.

To start with it’s probably negligence, but nurses questioned the practice and were fobbed off. To continue after that shows the docs were aware of the consequences and therefore acted with malice aforethought, making it murder.

They’ll probably get off with a parking fine.
As this is relating to a care setting it should be willful negligence if any form of negligence. Negligence and willful negligence are treated differently.
 
#16
As this is relating to a care setting it should be willful negligence if any form of negligence. Negligence and willful negligence are treated differently.
In what context? Legally there is negligence and gross negligence.
 
#17
In what context? Legally there is negligence and gross negligence.
In care negligence gets split into differing types, and the sanctions or punishments reflect the type of negligence, but yes, all are still negligence.

As an example of what I have seen someone prosecuted for, a person was not feeding a client at certain mealtimes. They were sacked as they had deliberately witheld the food so it was willful neglect (a 'section 44' from memory, an NHS bod may confirm that) rather than neglect if they had simply forgotten to feed the client due to being busy etc.

The variations were to differentiate between deliberate acts and poor policies/forgetting something etc.
 

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