Goodbye.

Guns

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#2
Why would a 2 Star in charge of a predominantly admin function need a combat medal? Does having a combat medal make you some how better at senior strategic management?
 
#3
Guns, LAIT implies that the "covenant", the "brotherhood" if you will, is best served by those who are part of it: if you haven't been to war and shared that experience you can't fully serve those who you lead. I don't fully agree - but I do believe that having been there and done that, that it makes you a better, more understanding and even more loyal leader (rather than chief executive).
LAIT, you seem to be where I was a few short years ago. The good will remain, the bad, the bullshit and the political jousting will soon fade. Good luck.
 
#5
If you put your clenched fist into a basin of water, and then remove it, the hole you leave is exactly how much the mob miss you on your departure. ie nothing, zip, nada, zero, zilch.

We are none of us indispensable; prior to your departure, the MS Glasgow / RAF Manning / RN Appointers will have been sourcing an equally qualified and talented replacement. That's what they are paid to do.

Arguably (and not having a dig at the OP), the future of HM Forces through the next 10-20yrs is likely to be tumultuous to put it mildly. The interests of the military, I'd offer, will be better served if those who are currently dissatisfied, uncomfortable with change and drawdown etc, make the leap for The Afterlife.
 
#6
I feel the OPs pain. Somewhere along the line, things seem to have gone wrong. Not in the operational sense; the guys and girls now are, as always, some of the finest of their generation, but certainly with the leadership something is amiss.

When did it suddenly become so necessary to bend the truth to achieve results?

You probably know the sort of thing I'm alluding to; labelling a budget form as a "Corporate Lunch" so the lads can have a Christmas party, because the budgeteers won't accept "tradition" as a reason to fund something. Putting down a spurious "business reason" to get soldiers out on AT/Battlefield Tour/social event because otherwise the activity will be rejected by someone, somewhere, in the Ivory Towers more concerned with keeping within budget than doing the activities that keep our ethos alive.

And before the plaintive cries of "Why should we pay for X, Y and Z?" start - because those activities directly affect morale, which directly affects Fighting Power. The Forces are an employer like no other (I keep hearing "unlimited liability"), and to place civilian constraints, management speak and general bull in the way does our soldiers a disservice.

Why can't I be free of bureaucracy and lies to do the simplest function of an officer: To lead and keep soldiers trained, motivated and happy?
 
B

Beans-on-toast

Guest
#7
All the best LAIT, your post sums it all up, I left in 05 having done 22, feeling threaders and wishing I had done summat else.
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
You probably know the sort of thing I'm alluding to; labelling a budget form as a "Corporate Lunch" so the lads can have a Christmas party, because the budgeteers won't accept "tradition" as a reason to fund something. Putting down a spurious "business reason" to get soldiers out on AT/Battlefield Tour/social event because otherwise the activity will be rejected by someone, somewhere, in the Ivory Towers more concerned with keeping within budget than doing the activities that keep our ethos alive.
Have you thought of putting speaking clock as a reason on your budget forms?
 
#9
After 22 years I've had enough.

I joined as a 16-year old Junior Paratrooper and I'm leaving as an ex-CO and COS.

So what?

God I'm sick of the relentless bullshit. The lies. The never-ending management speak. The fact that the really senior 'leadership' cares not one jot about the blokes and what they've been through. The new RAF 2-star with no operational medals pretty much sums up the reality of Armed Forces 'leadership'.

So goodbye to it all. I want to say that I've loved my time. But the Armed Forces of the future is something I want no part of. I hope that the young people joining will feel invested in and supported. But I'm too miserably cynical to think that will happen.

So: thank you to all the Toms who fought hard with no thought of reward. Thank you to all the really decent senior officers who gave a shit. And thank you to the public who really dug in and kept the flame of the covenant alive. Because it doesn't exist in reality. But mostly I want to say 'Thank you' to Cpl X and Sgt Y and WO2 Z who made it happen time and again in a shitty backstreet in Sangin.

I wasn't worthy. God bless you all.

Me out.
All the best in civvy street.
 
#13
I get the feeling LAIT is a bit brassed off he hasn't been offered a job with Babcock/Serco/Capita.
If you want to ignore the point that's okay. If you want to suggest that we are not too employable, you're wrong chum. I can smugly state that you can, for once, choose your own path when you leave the green. Need the income? Get a grown up job. Fancy the alternative lifestyle? That's do-able. Want job satisfaction and still get a kick? There is a huge growth market in the hot spots market in vast areas of the world that will satisfy that itch - and you can salve your conscience at not having a noble purpose by banking the cheque each month. I have done the last thing and keep my morals and my conscience in a box that gets opened when I go on leave. in the meantime, I have a company that actually lets me get on and command - not lead or manage as they would wish it called, but command in the fashion that the army used to allow. Ironic to find the traits that the OP bewails the death of alive, well and in demand in the civvy sector.
 
#14
Why would a 2 Star in charge of a predominantly admin function need a combat medal? Does having a combat medal make you some how better at senior strategic management?
To your first point: Leadership.

To your second: because by their very nature the Armed Forces need leadership and not 'senior strategic management'. MoD CS can provide the latter.
 
#15
If you look at the RAF senior management, many of them have MBA's. This is what passes as Leadership in the hallowed ranks of the militant wing of Easyjet.
 

Subsunk

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#17
Best of luck - with your experience, you will smash it outside. You'll then be set up to help square away some of your guys when they come to leave the Forces. You can also get some payback when buffoons who are leaving think they are entitled to your support, regardless of how incompetent and self-serving they are. I'm starting to get this and thinning them out while helping the good guys is most gratifying.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#18
Why would a 2 Star in charge of a predominantly admin function need a combat medal? Does having a combat medal make you some how better at senior strategic management?
The OP said 'operational', not 'combat'. Do you not find it even slightly odd that a professional officer with aspirations to high command hasn't felt even the slightest inclination to test their abilities in an operational environment and that their parent service has not felt the need to ask them to do so, particularly given the 'To do' list that UK Forces have been working through since the Warsaw Pact threw its hand in?
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
God I'm sick of the relentless bullshit. The lies. The never-ending management speak. The fact that the really senior 'leadership' cares not one jot about the blokes and what they've been through. The new RAF 2-star with no operational medals pretty much sums up the reality of Armed Forces 'leadership'.
Speaking as the proverbial never served civilian, may I be the first to welcome you to more of the same in the corporate sector. There are very few 'do what's morally right' managers in the civilian sector either.

Stand by for a feeling of deja-vu...

Wordsmith
 

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