Goliath boots - worn insoles at heels

Discussion in 'Military Clothing & Boots' started by IndependentBoffin, May 12, 2012.

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  1. Hello folks,

    I hope everyone is having a great weekend! :)

    I have a pair of Goliath boots that are around a year old. I did a lot of walking/hiking in them and the heel part of their insoles is worn just below my heel (see picture)

    I've tried putting insole inserts and they get chewed up. Walking with the boots as they are is very uncomfortable and begets blisters.

    Can anyone suggest something to fix the problem or stop it from happening in the future?

    The rest of the boots are fine (testament to good quality!) and I am kind of hesitant to throw them away.

    Thanks for any advice!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. If they have moulded soles like a pair of trainers with an air pocket/void in the middle then you have fucked them.

    Buy boots with a proper replacable sole in future, not trainer style glued on ones.

    The only fix I can suggets is taking the insole out and filling the hole with Sikaflex sealant and letting it go off.
     
  3. Size 94?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. loool! :)
     
  5. I get this with the cheapo trainers that I buy with vouchers at Tesco. I work around this by cuting a piece of old mousemat to fit at the heal, and then use a full size insole over the top of that. Works ok for me and it's cheap. In fact I have a collection of handy insoles, some from old army boots, but most are homemade from whatever's around. Neoprene is good and long lasting so a pair of neoprene insoles can be used time and again. Even right now I am wearing an old pair of slippers with holes in, but they are as comfy as **** because I've cut some old socks into cosy insoles for them. :) Of course you can still get new boots, but don't throw out the old ones till you've got your money's worth out of them.
     
  6. OK thanks for all the advice folks! :) I will also try out the mousemat/insole suggestion.

    Any recommendations for a future pair of boots that resist this particular wear at the heel for walking/hiking?

    Some brands of boots I wore showed the wear in the rubber sole heel instead of the insole heel. The rubber got really worn to the point that water can seep into the insoles through the heel and the boots adopted a bowed "U"-shape. The rubber the Goliath boots are made of seems tougher and they haven't worn to this degree.
     
  7. Buy better boots instead.
     
  8. Advice? Stop buying cheap work boots for hiking and spend some money on a real pair of boots. The outer soles are not wearing down because they are probably oil / acid resistant so have no shock-absorbing qualities at all, further knackering your knees and feet.

    Go to a proper outdoor shop and have a look. The majority of decent boots have Vibram soles for a god reason. They can usually be re-soled as well rather than chucking once worn.
     
  9. You say you did a lot of walking in them, after a years ownership just how many days bimbling did they do then.

    Good boots last do last. Even Doc Martens start to go after daily use, invest in good boots your feet are your first comfort when you avoid sitting down all day.
     
  10. Pardon me! I had no idea Goliath boots were work boots and considered inappropriate for walking/hiking. I bought it because of its Goretex liner.

    What brand do you suggest then?
     
  11. Anything but shitty Goliath work boots aimed at fat security guards and PCSO's,

    Hiking boots, with a proper dual density foam heel and replacable Vibram sole, I told you this after your first post, others have told you as well.

    Now go to Go-Outdoors or similar and pick up a pair of actual 3 season mountain boots, Brasher, Scarpa etc etc whichever they have on sale which have an actual GTX lining. Don't buy black ninja boots again or crap Karrimor ones, they are cheap and nasty nylon crap which will give you fungal infections.
     
  12. You don't need a Goretex lining unless the boots are fabric. Leather is waterproof enough if treated correctly. Go to a reputable outdoor shop near you, whilst wearing decent socks, and try a few pairs on. I can't recommend a brand because they are all made on different lasts so have different fittings. For example, I have average-to-narrow feet and I find German brands are too wide for me - as are North Face boots.
     
  13. From actual experience of wearing leather boots day in day out in the shittest of weather - yes you want a liner of goretex even if they are leather. Treating them all the time with wax doesn't cut it, just because people put up with impractical high maintenance crap 30 years ago does not mean you have to today.