Going to Sandhurst - What to expect from the Intelligence Corps 2 day assessment and how best to prepare?

Hi all,

I'm going to Sandhurst in May this year and I want to join the Intelligence Corps. For those who have been through the assessment for the Intelligence Corps at Sandhurst, what was it like and do you have any tips to prepare? (apart from the obvious, keeping up with current affairs, practice interview questions etc.)

Thanks!
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
You'll be briefed on what you need to know if you get that far. Not meant to sound walty and James Bondish, more that the Corps knows what it wants, will recognise it when it sees it and finds it best to talk to any potential soldier or officer on level terms. Keeping up on current affairs, obviously - but that would be expected of any soon-to-be-officer. Exercising some judgement and insight and thinking about why things are the way they are and how they're being represented in the media - and why - is generally useful, as is the key question after any review of the facts - 'so what'.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I'm going to Sandhurst in May this year and I want to join the Intelligence Corps. For those who have been through the assessment for the Intelligence Corps at Sandhurst, what was it like and do you have any tips to prepare? (apart from the obvious, keeping up with current affairs, practice interview questions etc.)

Thanks!
It has varied substantially over the years. Other than the above, I'd keep up with PLANEX / estimate type problems; read around various types of analysis or analytical problems; lateral thinking; as well as observation, psychology/influence and dealing with people.

Unless they've recently standardised it (don't think they have) a variety of the above has come up in the past 10 years depending on who was running the assesment that year. Obviously this is a clever trick to avoid gaming the system, and not simply a general level of disorganisation.

BTW unless you literally devolve into a gibbering mess in interviews and cannot express what is in your head in the moment, I'm not sure "practice interview questions" is always good advice. I've done enough interviews to know that it's glaringly obvious when you are getting a prepared answer, and, bar factual information, all that happens is that they get a tick against "prepared answer / don't know". RSB type interviews are much more concerned than most with establishing who you are as a person, so by coming across as, basically, someone who may be faking it, you aren't really helping yourself. Probably better for all involved to be open and genuine, and roll the dice that you are in fact who they are looking for. Your generation (I'm guessing 21-28) tend to be super concerned about getting the "right" answer in interviews, missing that this isn't always the point, and is often frustrating the interviewer and what they are looking for. Relaxing and being yourself is probably better advice for regimental interviews.
 
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