Going off grid

I have seen a few episodes of Building Alaska on the telly.Some of those people really are “off grid” One was so remote the only way in was by a float plane.Every trip in the plane was $600 Then the perma frost issues,mosquitoes,bears ....and yet they still are able o build some amazing looking cabins.
 
I have seen a few episodes of Building Alaska on the telly.Some of those people really are “off grid” One was so remote the only way in was by a float plane.Every trip in the plane was $600 Then the perma frost issues,mosquitoes,bears ....and yet they still are able o build some amazing looking cabins.
I do wonder, fwiw, what those particular off-griders receive for being on the show? Certainly money and some logistics support. That is, to what extent are they off-grid? (genuine question as they could be unsupported for all I know).
 
I have seen a few episodes of Building Alaska on the telly.Some of those people really are “off grid” One was so remote the only way in was by a float plane.Every trip in the plane was $600 Then the perma frost issues,mosquitoes,bears ....and yet they still are able o build some amazing looking cabins.

Talking about this show?


They still had internet in the end...but building something out of nothing in the middle of nowhere was amazing!
 

RigPig

War Hero
We must have done the same course, 'Designing for a sustainable future' I think?

Mine was a Outdoor Education Centre in the Lakes, solar PV wind turbines with a battery to store the electricity, ground source heat pumps along with wood pellet burner/back boiler and thermal store arrangement (I'd designed and fitted similar in my house at the time so heating was free) and the building was based around the Bauhaus (??) German zero emissions thingy. Nearby river provided drinking water with reedbed filtration and grey water collection systems.
Ultimately it wasn't cheap due to the building costs and no doubt the savings made would take a few 100 years to justify the total cost, but it was very green and totally off grid.
I think that was what the course was called. Part of Environmental Sciences degree they did. I was doing it in the late 90’s and early 2000’s. I never did get around to finishing the course. I have the Level 3 modules to do. Time and other courses got in the way. I ended up doing a Cert Ed in Higher Education whilst I could get the course for free. Maybe I should dig out my OU stuff and finish it. Time being the factor with a small child and shift work stops me.

I enjoyed the course, though my wife who has a MEnv Sci (Southampton Uni) said it was completely different to her course. She had all the facilities a Uni can offer along with tutors on hand. My course was part time and tutors only had limited contact hours so there would be a difference. The summer school was a week long where you could be with other students in a uni environment.

@Anonymous Yank yes you are correct. I should know better. Dunces cap for me.

RP.
 
@Anonymous Yank yes you are correct. I should know better. Dunces cap for me.

RP.
Not for confusing hay with straw.

However, your wild and woolly use, misplacement, and non-use of commas (and apostrophes) may deserve a look. ;)
 
if you are serius about this , have a look on FB site Motorhome madness, or any of the other MH sites
A wealth of information buried in there

Dozens of MoHos are using solar … can be expensive to set up


edited to add , cheaper than house solar
You can find solar panels cheap enough on Marketplace etc I've a 250w on top of the camper paid about 50 quid for it glass cracked but still charges OK, Problem with using them on a camper is they lie flat so you don't get the full use out of one even less in the winter so need as big as you can mount and factor in the MPPT charger loads on ebay claiming to be but aren't

I did see a guy on motorhome madness mount a small one on top of an old oyster Sat dish mount and use a Pi system with GPS to track the sun so the panel is always on the optimal position to maximise the sun's rays.

I've bolted my 250w on these which are then mounted onto the roof rails with heavy duty zip ties so if I want to I can cut the zip ties and angle the panel to which ever direction I need it. I've just got my mitts on some heavy duty UPS batteries that I'm going to see if they will fit and if so swap out my leisure batteries. As I think one is on it way out and even both whoich are 200amps in total soon drain down when the sat dish is trying to lock on.



Given the brightness of LED's now I reckon you could quite happily run your house lighting on a 12v rather than 240v feed.

As a side note anyone watched this yet watched the past few seasons well worth a watch.
Ben Fogle: New Lives In The Wild - Channel 5
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
just been watching stuff on telly about folks going off grid. I must say I'm vaguely interested by the idea.
Move to South Africa.
 
We are pretty much off grid here. I supply my own water from well water and generate electricity as well as having a whole house generator, internet is satellite internet. Food we grow during the growing season which we blanche, dry off and freeze. Meat, I raise cattle and the missus has her chickens. I butcher one of the cows every year, half of which I trade for pork and lamb, on top of that we have plentiful game and fish around these parts.

I have two huge underground fuel tanks, one for oil and one for propane, electricity is supplied by two windmills. We also have a hand pump for water should the brown smelly stuff hit the fan.

It's a lot of work but I wouldn't have it any other way as I love living this life.
Deliverance.png
 
Try this:

 
35k US$ - bear in mind its a four seater, and its dependent on what avionics come with it, time to next overhaul/inspection etc
Buying an aircraft is cheap.

Keeping one, not so much.

Not relevant here as any off gridder would I guess be a sole user but most light aircraft here are owned by syndicates. You pay a set amount each month into a pot that covers maintenance etc, thereafter just pay for your fuel.
 
Buying an aircraft is cheap.

Keeping one, not so much.

Not relevant here as any off gridder would I guess be a sole user but most light aircraft here are owned by syndicates. You pay a set amount each month into a pot that covers maintenance etc, thereafter just pay for your fuel.
My doctor is a super good bloke, he’s offered to help me with flying anxiety by letting me use his Cessna for flying lessons. I’ve flown nearly two million miles, but still hate flying. Anyway, I digress. It’s not actually his aircraft any more, he gave it to his buddy on condition that the friend maintains it, and Ken (my Dr) can use it any time he wants. Ken is not a stupid man!
 
The problem in the UK is that the planning system doesn't allow for anyone to just buy land, build a cabin and live on it, which is stupid because responsible people who would like to live off grid would use less rescouces, utilities and council services . Naturally if there was a free for all the entire country side would turn into a shanty town of unsafe buildings and raw sewage filler rivers but there could be a planning process to allow some dwellings like cabins, yurts or huts.

I'm planning on buying some isolated woodland if the funds become available and starting of with a Shepard's hut, stay there for longer and longer periods and see what the score is.
 
The problem in the UK is that the planning system doesn't allow for anyone to just buy land, build a cabin and live on it, which is stupid because responsible people who would like to live off grid would use less rescouces, utilities and council services . Naturally if there was a free for all the entire country side would turn into a shanty town of unsafe buildings and raw sewage filler rivers but there could be a planning process to allow some dwellings like cabins, yurts or huts.

I'm planning on buying some isolated woodland if the funds become available and starting of with a Shepard's hut, stay there for longer and longer periods and see what the score is.
Structure has to be non permanent to overcome a raft of objections iirc.
Wooden Shepherd's hut would fit. Just make it a good 6inches off the ground on some loose bricks to make sure you don't get ground water flooding. 8x6 foot , wriggly tin roof, good to go. It's not fixed to the ground, has no running water , not permanent.
 
The problem in the UK is that the planning system doesn't allow for anyone to just buy land, build a cabin and live on it, which is stupid because responsible people who would like to live off grid would use less rescouces, utilities and council services . Naturally if there was a free for all the entire country side would turn into a shanty town of unsafe buildings and raw sewage filler rivers but there could be a planning process to allow some dwellings like cabins, yurts or huts.

I'm planning on buying some isolated woodland if the funds become available and starting of with a Shepard's hut, stay there for longer and longer periods and see what the score is.
Structure has to be non permanent to overcome a raft of objections iirc.
Wooden Shepherd's hut would fit. Just make it a good 6inches off the ground on some loose bricks to make sure you don't get ground water flooding. 8x6 foot , wriggly tin roof, good to go. It's not fixed to the ground, has no running water , not permanent.
That’s interesting. I looked at the woodland sales link above with a view to just that but clearly a lot of people have similar ideas as the company in the link provide a useful guide that basically says “forget it”. Useful info re not fixed / no running water to potentially get around this.

I'm not looking to go full on hermit, more looking to get a few days here and there away from phones and fuckwits.
 
My doctor is a super good bloke, he’s offered to help me with flying anxiety by letting me use his Cessna for flying lessons. I’ve flown nearly two million miles, but still hate flying. Anyway, I digress. It’s not actually his aircraft any more, he gave it to his buddy on condition that the friend maintains it, and Ken (my Dr) can use it any time he wants. Ken is not a stupid man!
Ken is a very smart man!

Easyjet and others do fear of flying courses which I’m told are quite good. Not offering a full on therapy course here but if you have any specific questions about tech aspects that cause you anxiety (most anxiety about flying is a combination of not knowing and not being in control), drop me a line.
 
Ken is a very smart man!

Easyjet and others do fear of flying courses which I’m told are quite good. Not offering a full on therapy course here but if you have any specific questions about tech aspects that cause you anxiety (most anxiety about flying is a combination of not knowing and not being in control), drop me a line.
Thanks for that very kind offer. I'll give some thought to what exactly it is that troubles me and PM you.
 
That’s interesting. I looked at the woodland sales link above with a view to just that but clearly a lot of people have similar ideas as the company in the link provide a useful guide that basically says “forget it”. Useful info re not fixed / no running water to potentially get around this.

I'm not looking to go full on hermit, more looking to get a few days here and there away from phones and fuckwits.
Basically, it's no different to a garden shed.
You could lift it and move it around with a fork lift or trailer. It's drier than a tent and there's room to move around in.
 

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