god I am bored

#1
Is it just me or is anyone else thinking that the army is just like a bit of a prison sentence?

For example, when you ask someone how long they have done, if they have done less than 12 years they will say with enthusiasm how many years they have done and what rank and qual they have achieved but if you ask anyone who has done more than 12 years they will tell you how long they have left to do as if its a sentence.

Dont know about you fellows but for me the fun has well and truely gone from this job I once loved.

Please prove me wrong.
 
#2
Sorry, totally in the same boat as you. 20 years done and every day seems to sap my morale and life more. Im still fit and want to get on with things but find the beaurocracy and idiotic decisions by our Officer Corps just seem to hammer each nail in the coffin. It feels as though all these staff officers knocking around in RHQ, DEME(A), Bde HQs etc have no concept of what is happening on the shopfloor and all that they are interested in is generating work to justify their existence. 80% LEAR? 10% manpower? No problem, oh and you can still do STT, IST, MATTS etc etc etc. Bullsh!t! No wonder Bn's have a bad name, there's no fecker there and they're not allowed to spanner.

Good news is I didn't come off the VEng board last week!



Wonder how our cuts will be made when the plan comes out? LE & lads before DE I bet.
 
#3
It's not a job it's an adventure young Julius. I'm currently living the dream and in only 6 hours will be departing to Her Majesty's finest Wiltshire training area in my Aluminium chariot. I'm planning on charging around for a fortnight, driving through pennings and knocking down plantations in my fine steed.

If you're not feeling the love, perhaps you could meet up with some old friends for a pissup in a small inbred village. If you were to wear your corps tie, perhaps the village idiot would take such a shine to it that you would be forced to gift it to him, in order to secure his wobbly headed departure.

Failing that get a posting far far away from the Royal Sigs.
 
A

armadillo

Guest
#4
Bored too, watched a doc the other day about a womens prison, better accommodation loads of lesbos, staying in bed all day, no moronic officers to muck your day up,

thing is I paid loads to do **** all, for no ******* reason by some fuckwit (who could never get a job in the city)

Get away from the corps... run like the wind, at the speed of a thousand ga...... dam it I am institutionalised
 
#5
Aaaah. Is the grass always greener on the other side? Get a good hobby or focus on personal development if bored and try and add value to those who may look up to you in whatever innovative and legal ways you can think of.

At least you are getting a wage, albeit not perhaps fully earning it due to the alleged incompetence of others. The pension deal remains better than for most others in the country (for now!)

Dont allow yourself to be bored!!
 
#10
I left 14 years ago after 27 years in uniform. It's not rosy out in the land they call Civvy, far from it. Out here, you have to work for a living, you can't go and hide in the MT or stores or walk about with a piece of paper saying you're on your way to a meeting; you have to think for yourself and manage your own affairs. You are accountable for your own actions.

In the Army, Navy or RAF, you could generally hide a cock-up by blaming either the system, your immediate superior or an officer but never yourself. In this place where the land is said to be greener, you have to take it on the chin, you fukk-up, you take the sh1t.

Things only settle down to equality once Joe Civvy and Mr (or Mrs) Military have retired albeit one may have a larger pot of gold to piss up against a wall than the other. But you can then lie in bed and do the square root of sod-all and nobody (apart from your better half) is going to tell you to sweep the square, polish your boots or get a haircut.
 
#11
I left 14 years ago after 27 years in uniform. It's not rosy out in the land they call Civvy, far from it. Out here, you have to work for a living, you can't go and hide in the MT or stores or walk about with a piece of paper saying you're on your way to a meeting; you have to think for yourself and manage your own affairs. You are accountable for your own actions.

In the Army, Navy or RAF, you could generally hide a cock-up by blaming either the system, your immediate superior or an officer but never yourself. In this place where the land is said to be greener, you have to take it on the chin, you fukk-up, you take the sh1t.
If you went through your forces career with this attitude no wonder you thought civvy street was harder......
 
#12
Good news........... but is the grass always greener?
Ok not ALWAYS, but 90%....

99% of statistics are made up on the spot you know.
 
#13
All_I_Want: No, I didn't go through Service life with an attitude, in fact if you get that big coloured badge on your arm, you haven't - but you're in a position to notice it more in others.
 
#16
You grin and bear it through the sh*t times and use the adventure training, sport and pss ups to take away the gloom. Worst part is between the 13-18 year point but then you start to smell the possible gratuity at the 22 year point. Problem is you start sh*tting your self around the 21 year point when you start Resettlement thinking that your about to go out in that scarey world. Luckily I got a extra three years to get myself steadily into CIVDIV, the only problem now is Im back into Resettlement again and my 25 year point fastly approaching................BORED....never it what you make of it and the mates you meet...only last month I spoke with a LE Captain who i havent seen for 20 years ago in Traz and it was like we have always been posted together.
The fun is what you make of it, its up to you to get off your ARRSE and organise piss ups, trips away etc ...........I was probably spoilt with being abroad for over 14 years, UK can be sh*t at times but you have more chance of getting away in works time on a jolly or social event then you do in CIV DIV.
 
#17
Guys, you're so lucky you don't realise it.

I had a real bad RTA many years ago and had to be medically discharged from the REME, the day I left was an extremely sad day.

However, I'm not one to give in and managed to get myself back to a reasonable level of fitness and now enjoy a pretty good career in the insurance industry and am an active member of my local Army cadet detachment.

Stop looking at the grass on the other side, it's just the same old grass that your stood on. :)
 
#18
I must admit I recently assessed where I am in my career and started to worry that the best of times I've had in The Army were behind me and its all work work work from here on in.....
I'm a bit of fat knacker now (although I can still pass AFT/CFT) and I've recently hung up my rugby boots due to being sick of re occurring injuries. Well, that and being carthorse slow.
I always regretted never doing P coy. It was offered to me on a plate straight after my JMC about 12 years ago and I went on leave instead. So all things considered, I was interviewing the blokes the other day, getting them to go through their personal objectives, prepping for the next round of reports before getting stuck back into endless audits and EMS etc and I asked them all weather they fancied getting badged.
Long story short; now I've got one lad on selection, two doing the Cdo beat up and two on pre Para. They're all dead keen and it's made me chuffed to watch 'em go for it.
I might be feeling over the hill but it gives me a buzz sorting out the toms careers and that makes it worthwhile for me.
 

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