Glos NHS in Crisis...Military Assistance Maybe Required

#1
Just reported in the local rag, bulk of story will be in today's paper:

Glos NHS Fcuked

"Health bosses say military assistance may be required as the NHS in Gloucestershire reaches breaking point.
The service is under huge pressure following a massive rise in hospital admissions and emergency calls.
Great Western Ambulance Service took 1,000 calls a day at the weekend - a 36% increase on last year.
Coun Andrew Gravells (C, Abbey), chairman of Gloucestershire’s Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee, added: “This unprecedented demand is clearly having a major impact on the county’s emergency services and this is a concern for us all.
“Staff at the PCT, ambulance service and hospitals are working flat out to resolve the situation but if this is not enough then we should consider asking for help from other NHS organisations in the region and even the military.”

*For the full story, please see today's editions of The Citizen and the Gloucestershire Echo.

Discuss, should the military, overstreached to breaking point, be able to intervene, bearing in mind that the majority of TA med units use NHS staff, where would UK forces be able to find the available bods from the regulars???
 
#2
Firstly, why the increase in admissions and 999 calls?
 
#3
Because they are all retards down this way :) Too many farmers falling off their tractors when pi55ed???

I will try and get a copy of the rag later and will extract the info if I can
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#4
PartTimePongo said:
Firstly, why the increase in admissions and 999 calls?
It's winter. Winter Vomiting Virus, OAPs with cold injuries, falls, etc
 
#6
Could the NHS be at breaking point? The Royal Gloucestershire Hospital closed it's doors at the end of last week to new patients and has also restricted the visitors at the hospital to try and stop the speading of the sickness virus.

This could have a serious backlash on public services that have been constantly failed by the government, overloading them with middle managment and "strategy" experts, all the time seeing their experienced nurses and newly qualified nurses fleeing to Oz and NZ due to better pay and conditions.

Could this be the beggining of the end for the NHS as we know it?
 
#7
paleblue_1 said:
we should consider asking for help from other NHS organisations in the region and even the military.”

*For the full story, please see today's editions of The Citizen and the Gloucestershire Echo.

Discuss, should the military, overstreached to breaking point, be able to intervene, bearing in mind that the majority of TA med units use NHS staff, where would UK forces be able to find the available bods from the regulars???
Even the military Seem to recall we did a good job a few years ago. I would have thought the Forces would have been the first choice of call, seeing as the other NHS trusts are just as fcuked.

Glasgow (IIRC) are now charging £30 to view your reletives in the morgue!!! Due to "financial difficulties".

Of course the problem is.... where do the troops come from?
 
#8
chocolate_frog said:
Of course the problem is.... where do the troops come from?
And, indeed, what do the troops do? Set up a field hospital in the car park? How many will that hold? After a ward closure spree, my local hospital has no free beds one night in three.

How many paediatric beds does an army hospital have for kiddies with asthma?
 
#9
Ancient_Mariner said:
chocolate_frog said:
Of course the problem is.... where do the troops come from?
And, indeed, what do the troops do? Set up a field hospital in the car park? How many will that hold? After a ward closure spree, my local hospital has no free beds one night in three.

How many paediatric beds does an army hospital have for kiddies with asthma?
What army hospital?

They going to ship them down to Haslar?
 
#10
chocolate_frog said:
paleblue_1 said:
we should consider asking for help from other NHS organisations in the region and even the military.”

*For the full story, please see today's editions of The Citizen and the Gloucestershire Echo.

Discuss, should the military, overstreached to breaking point, be able to intervene, bearing in mind that the majority of TA med units use NHS staff, where would UK forces be able to find the available bods from the regulars???
Even the military Seem to recall we did a good job a few years ago. I would have thought the Forces would have been the first choice of call, seeing as the other NHS trusts are just as fcuked.

Glasgow (IIRC) are now charging £30 to view your reletives in the morgue!!! Due to "financial difficulties".

Of course the problem is.... where do the troops come from?

I'd imagine 'even the military' as normal circumstances would be the NHS providing assistance to stretched military medics?
 
#11
Both St John and the British Red Cross are statutory auxiliary services, and can be called upon to assist the NHS if required. I would expect this to happen before any military assistance is requested.

The voluntary bodies can now provide frontline ambulances, equipped to the same standard as NHS vehicles, and with appropriately trained staff. I imagine that they would initially be used (as they already are in some places), to carry out non-emergency tasks and free up NHS A&E vehicles.

In any case, what assistance to request is a matter for the County Council's Emergency Planning Dept., who will be fully aware of the resources they can call upon under the Civil Contingencies Act.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#12
ViroBono said:
Both St John and the British Red Cross are statutory auxiliary services, and can be called upon to assist the NHS if required. I would expect this to happen before any military assistance is requested.

The voluntary bodies can now provide frontline ambulances, equipped to the same standard as NHS vehicles, and with appropriately trained staff.
I imagine that they would initially be used (as they already are in some places), to carry out non-emergency tasks and free up NHS A&E vehicles.

In any case, what assistance to request is a matter for the County Council's Emergency Planning Dept., who will be fully aware of the resources they can call upon under the Civil Contingencies Act.
And they have - in the 1989/90 Ambulance Strike - on full Blue Light service
 
#13
They going to ship them down to Haslar?[/quote]

prob not cos haslar has had its resources cut hasn't it :?
 
#14
ViroBono said:
The voluntary bodies can now provide frontline ambulances, equipped to the same standard as NHS vehicles, and with appropriately trained staff.
I'd have to take issue with that statement VB, the SJA vehicles whilst nice and clean aren't equipped to the same standards and training levels vary wildly. The bulk of the professionally qualified staff they have access to are still needed in their day jobs. Red Cross? Not a hope round here.

Anyone thinking this is a blip in the Great Western area should look back over their performance since amalgamation, it's no accident the CEO got binned recently.

Overall the problem is caused by a lack of available beds due to the various D&V bugs and chest infections doing the rounds, admissions are up for the same reasons and the icy weather hasn't helped. A cynic might draw parallels between increasing fuel prices and an increase in respiratory problems in vulnerable people.

If you think this is bad, wait until the flu hits.

SD
:)
 
#15
PartTimePongo said:
Firstly, why the increase in admissions and 999 calls?
Combination of things. All the snow and ice last week meant a big rise in falls/breaks/sprains, there's a particularly nasty flu type virus doing the rounds at the moment, 50% of my ffice have been off in the last week including me, and the norovirus.

My local hospitals have all been red/red in the last week.

Not quite sure how the military medical services could help though as 75% plus work for the NHS anyhow.
 
#16
ViroBono said:
Both St John and the British Red Cross are statutory auxiliary services, and can be called upon to assist the NHS if required. I would expect this to happen before any military assistance is requested.

The voluntary bodies can now provide frontline ambulances, equipped to the same standard as NHS vehicles, and with appropriately trained staff. I imagine that they would initially be used (as they already are in some places), to carry out non-emergency tasks and free up NHS A&E vehicles.

In any case, what assistance to request is a matter for the County Council's Emergency Planning Dept., who will be fully aware of the resources they can call upon under the Civil Contingencies Act.
Problem isn't so much lack of ambulances but where would these patients go as all the wards are full.
 
#17
The line "call the military" is a delighfully outdated view to Emergency planning. The MOD doctrine is clear - we no longer intervene in circumstances such as this, except as a last resort. There are a lot of other people who are far better equipped than ourselves to assist.

Not sure who the new JRLO is for that region, but I trust he has told the County where to put its request, in the politest possible terms of course!
 
#18
paleblue_1 said:
...and has also restricted the visitors at the hospital to try and stop the speading of the sickness virus....
If people are too bone headed and stupid to wash their hands when they have been to visit sick people then they should just be taken out and executed for social irresponsibility and their familes sent a bill for the estimated cost of spreading the disease further.

Edited to add: Also, the chance of Millitary Aid To the Civil Autority being given by (as I assume it would be) the Civil Contingecy reaction force is prety slim nowerdays with the lack of funds available.
 
#19
"Edited to add: Also, the chance of Millitary Aid To the Civil Autority being given by (as I assume it would be) the Civil Contingecy reaction force is prety slim nowerdays with the lack of funds available. "

Slim? Try non existent - there is no role for the CCRF that can't be done by first responders. The idea that you could get a bunch of reservists off the streets and suddenly turn them into uber responders was rubbish in the first place (that is said as a reservist AND former CCRF member). They have no role, no value, and by the time we could use them the emergency would be over.
 

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