Glider pilots at Arnhem

#1
Hi guys i am in the middle of watching A bridge to far and was just a wondering if any of you know what the Glider pilots did once they had landed? Did they go on with the advancing forces or get picked up some where?

Chalkie
 

AIRBORNEJOCK

War Hero
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#2
Hi guys i am in the middle of watching A bridge to far and was just a wondering if any of you know what the Glider pilots did once they had landed? Did they go on with the advancing forces or get picked up some where?

Chalkie
They sayed with the troops and fought as infantry,medics,artillery you name it they done it then on the withdrawal to the rhine they marked the route out and manned it with guides.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#5
From the AAC Museum's website The Museum of Army Flying: Glider Pilot

The Glider Pilot Regiment

Prompted by the successful use of parachute and glider forces by the Germans in May 1940, most notably on the well-defended fortress of Eben-Emael in Belgium by a force of troop-carrying DFS230 gliders, Winston Churchill directed that a parachute force of 5,000 troops should be formed.
As the RAF doubted whether they would be able to provide sufficient troop-carrying aircraft for a unit of this size, it was decided that a glider-borne force should complement the paratroops. Thus, the Glider Pilot Regiment was born and it, along with the Parachute Regiment and the Special Air Service Regiment, formed the first Army Air Corps (AAC).
If you want to know how nails a Glider Pilot was at Arnhem, ask Porridge_Gun.
 
#6
Warriors to a man.

The Glider pilots Regiment flew engineless, dangerous, craply put together piles of scrap timber directly to the battlefield, look at Pegasus Bridge.

Many armed with just pistols joined in the rest of the conflict on foot.

I was privileged to meet an ex GPR (NCO)pilot who flew in on the thrid day with the Polish. When he looked over his shoulder he realised they'd all be killed by ground fire. Instead of taking up space on a makeshift landing strip (ie a field near Oosterbeek) he drove and crash landed his shattered airframe into a nearby forest leaving a clear path for those following him.

He earned himself a DFC that day and went on to fight with the ground forces, as we know, like lions.

Its an absolute honour and a privelidge for my old cap badge to have the Glider Pilot Regiments battle honours on our Guidon.

If anyone has never made the pilgrimage to Oosterbeek, the Bridge and of course Hartenstein, stick it on your must do list. 23 years since my first visit and it never gets boring. I defy anyone to go there and not come away with a tear in your eye and a bit of a chubby on at the thought of being British.
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#8
Op Broadway, second Chindit Expedition, also 1944, saw many brave Glider pilots lose their lives many of whom were US ( Air Commando) delivering troops into partially cleared jungle landing areas. Those that survived went on to make many return trips delivering additional troops and supplies over the next few months. It was a fantastic example of joint operations carried out by multi-national forces in the most difficult of terrain.
 

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FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
Warriors to a man.

The Glider pilots Regiment flew engineless, dangerous, craply put together piles of scrap timber directly to the battlefield, look at Pegasus Bridge.

Many armed with just pistols joined in the rest of the conflict on foot.

I was privileged to meet an ex GPR (NCO)pilot who flew in on the thrid day with the Polish. When he looked over his shoulder he realised they'd all be killed by ground fire. Instead of taking up space on a makeshift landing strip (ie a field near Oosterbeek) he drove and crash landed his shattered airframe into a nearby forest leaving a clear path for those following him.

He earned himself a DFC that day and went on to fight with the ground forces, as we know, like lions.

Its an absolute honour and a privelidge for my old cap badge to have the Glider Pilot Regiments battle honours on our Guidon.

If anyone has never made the pilgrimage to Oosterbeek, the Bridge and of course Hartenstein, stick it on your must do list. 23 years since my first visit and it never gets boring. I defy anyone to go there and not come away with a tear in your eye and a bit of a chubby on at the thought of being British.
The ultimate though is Pegasus Bridge. When you see what they had to land on, in the dark and with no margin for error (the first British casualty on that Op drowned) it is astonishing. Very brave certainly but also technically excellent and professional in the extreme.
 
#10


That painting, I think sums up the sizes of their testes.

No homosexual, dropping them off five miles away and let them tab in. Nope, 'we'll try and land on the bridge' and moustaches like the ones below saw the Ox and Bucks delivered with UPS and DHL precison straight to the Bosches front door, so they could be given a damn good thrashing.



Never in the field of human conflict have moustaches made such a difference to operations.

Find me a brave man and you will find a moustache that could engulf a small child, and not in a dirty way!
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#11


That painting, I think sums up the sizes of their testes.

No homosexual, dropping them off five miles away and let them tab in. Nope, 'we'll try and land on the bridge' and moustaches like the ones below saw the Ox and Bucks delivered with UPS and DHL precison straight to the Bosches front door, so they could be given a damn good thrashing.



Never in the field of human conflict have moustaches made such a difference to operations.

Find me a brave man and you will find a moustache that could engulf a small child, and not in a dirty way!
Well said sir. I saw that picture on Wikipedia and thought exactly the same thing.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#12

AIRBORNEJOCK

War Hero
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#14
Op Broadway, second Chindit Expedition, also 1944, saw many brave Glider pilots lose their lives many of whom were US ( Air Commando) delivering troops into partially cleared jungle landing areas. Those that survived went on to make many return trips delivering additional troops and supplies over the next few months. It was a fantastic example of joint operations carried out by multi-national forces in the most difficult of terrain.
Ive done quite a bit of reading on the chindit ops and wasnt aware of british glider pilot regiment flying into any of the landing sites on OP THURSDAY as far as im aware all the gliders were flown by 1 AIR COMMANDO,gliders only flew in on the initial lifts then dakota strips were constructed for the further waves.

Porridge gun views on that?
 

AIRBORNEJOCK

War Hero
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#16


That painting, I think sums up the sizes of their testes.

No homosexual, dropping them off five miles away and let them tab in. Nope, 'we'll try and land on the bridge' and moustaches like the ones below saw the Ox and Bucks delivered with UPS and DHL precison straight to the Bosches front door, so they could be given a damn good thrashing.



Never in the field of human conflict have moustaches made such a difference to operations.

Find me a brave man and you will find a moustache that could engulf a small child, and not in a dirty way!
Glider 1 actually burst the barbed wire round the bridge now thats screwing the nut!
 
#17
Merville Battery.....those guys must have had ball of brass...they really did intend to crash (yeah I know they called it landing) directly ontop of the target.

Didn't quite work out like they planned it but they still took it.

******* amazing courage.
 
#18
Glider 1 actually burst the barbed wire round the bridge now thats screwing the nut!
With only a bit of Balsa wood, a posh party smock and a Webley / enfield revolver for the crew.

The remaining glider pilots on Remembrance sunday have wheel barrows before them on parade, it carries their big plums.

As for Op Thursday, wasn't aware of any GPR involvement and like you assumed it was 1 Air Commando.

It certainly doesn't feature on the Guidon or in anything I've quite extensively read about GPR (Doesn't mean I'm right by any means, usually the opposite.)
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#19
Ive done quite a bit of reading on the chindit ops and wasnt aware of british glider pilot regiment flying into any of the landing sites on OP THURSDAY as far as im aware all the gliders were flown by 1 AIR COMMANDO,gliders only flew in on the initial lifts then dakota strips were constructed for the further waves.

Porridge gun views on that?
Just re-reading my stuff, you are quite right, no Brit Glider pilots but most tow aircraft (later supply) were RAF Sqns. Gliders were used to provide supplies throughout campaign when conditions would not allow Daks to land. Interesting aside is that first use of helicopter for casualty evac is also claimed by 1st. Air Commando. Quite remarkable campaign all in all but now I will leave it to the rest to talk about the title of the thread!!
 
#20
If you can get hold of a copy you should read "Lion with Blue Wings, the story of the Glider Pilot Regiment 1942-1945"
 

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