Glider Pilot Landings - OP VARSITY

An interesting read:



Thank you - saving this one for a bit later.

I have always had the highest respect for GPR.
(Jumping out of a plane is piece of piss at its basic level)
Flying a glider, with various loads, various weather conditions, various light conditions, + navigation requires real skills way ahead of just being a roughty- toughty paratrooper.
 
Its interesting comparing his description of landing during VARSITY (first link) with his log book entry (second link).
 
An interesting bit is the Glider Pilot Regiment was trained and equipped to fight once on the ground whereas the USAAF Glider pilots WOJG's were supposed to be evacuated immediately if possible and had no real ground combat training.
 

Oyibo

LE
Huge respect for the pilots and troops.

There were some great dioramas of the Normandy countryside in the Airborne museum in Browning Barracks - Incredibly detailed. The creators set up wires over the (modelled) countryside with cameras on them to show films of approach paths for the glider pilots so that they could learn the LZs and the approaches.
 
Thank you - saving this one for a bit later.

I have always had the highest respect for GPR.
(Jumping out of a plane is piece of piss at its basic level)
Flying a glider, with various loads, various weather conditions, various light conditions, + navigation requires real skills way ahead of just being a roughty- toughty paratrooper.
And no parachutes, either.
 
Huge respect for the pilots and troops.

There were some great dioramas of the Normandy countryside in the Airborne museum in Browning Barracks - Incredibly detailed. The creators set up wires over the (modelled) countryside with cameras on them to show films of approach paths for the glider pilots so that they could learn the LZs and the approaches.
The model for Pegasus Bridge, inter alia was updated pretty much daily after Recce flights. I've seen it, it's amazing.

The diorama has now moved to Colly.
 
An interesting read:



Wow, what a story. A bit off-topic but you might also be interested in another amazing survival story, from 1971. This is a 17-year old Juliane Koepcke. Her wiki page is here.

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You don't have to look too far here to see that she was one tough cookie
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She and her mum were in a plane that disintegrated over Peru after the fuel tank was struck by lightning. As the plane broke into pieces she was hurled out, still strapped to her seat.

She fell over 10,000 ft and landed in the Amazon jungle with a broken collarbone, her right eye swollen shut, deep cuts in her arms and legs (one of which became infested with maggots), and a torn knee ligament. But she could still walk.

She made her way to the remains of the crashed plane, where she saw 1. she was the only survivor (her mother had been killed), and 2. discovered sweets to eat. She poured gasoline into her wound to kill the maggots, and then found a tiny creek which she followed downstream hoping that she'd eventually find other people.

She survived on her own for 10 days until she found some Peruvian lumberjacks who brought her to the nearest small town.

She received hundreds of letters from people she had never met before, some of the letters were simply addressed 'Juliane -- Peru' but they still all found their way to her
 

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