Give the electorate a referendum on the abolition of the House of Lords

#41
How democracy should work is each person over 18 gets one vote and in decision making, the side that has the most votes wins. Unfortunately there are 48% of those who voted in the Brexit referendum don't get that and a large number of idiots in the HoL trying their damnedest to subvert that process.
I thought the HoL passed the bill?
 
#42
Elect them using 1st alternative vote too, as that ensures the majority are represented by someone they at least partially support (or disapprove of least...).
Anyone saying 1st AV is too complicated to understand doesn't deserve a vote due to being denser than Mlaaarox.
 
#43
Some sort of powerless, bureaucratic, unelected committee? Got to make it unworkable somehow ;-)
Hang on a minute, lads – I've got a great idea.

Right, we're going to need:

1 x UK Parliament (UKP)
1 x Council of the United Kingdom
1 x UK Council
1 x UK Commission

How decisions are made

Using the so-called Community method, with the Commission initiating legislation and monitoring compliance, the UK institutions provide a means for UK member counties to work together efficiently in their mutual interest, making decisions effectively and ensuring that they all follow the rules that they’ve made.

Co-decision

The key to understanding how laws are passed in the UK Union is getting to grips with ‘co-decision,’ the ordinary legislative procedure (OLP). Whilst there are other procedures (consultation and cooperation being the two other main ones), as of the Luton Treaty, co-decision dominates, and was used for 89% of legislative proposals during the 2009–2014 legislative session.

Under the co-decision, the UK Commission, Council of the UK Union and UK Parliament all have a role to play in passing legislation. The Commission proposes legislation. Neither the UK Parliament nor the Council of the UK Union can adopt legislation without the consent of the other. There is a navette or ping-pong, a back-and-forth, between the UKP and Council as they seek to come to a mutually agreeable version of the Commission’s proposed legislation.

Consent and consultation

Most UK decision-making (including around the Single UK Market) uses this co-decision method, but other legislative processes are still in use in a small number of areas, for example the ‘consent’ procedure for measures to combat discrimination and the ‘consultation’ procedure in areas of justice and home affairs (e.g. police cooperation).

The legislation procedure

A piece of legislation is proposed by the Commission. It then goes to the UK Parliament for a first reading, where it first progresses through a committee, and then to the plenary (i.e. the full chamber), which may make amendments to the proposal. The Parliament decides by simple majority.

Legislation is then passed on for a first reading in the Council of the UK Union by the relevant ministers, who are supported by working groups and the Committee of Permanent Representatives (Coreper) below them.

Qualified majority voting

In most areas, the Council makes decisions by ‘qualified majority voting’— this means that a decision only passes if it is approved by 55% of the member counties (16/28 ), representing at least 65% of the UK’s population. Some areas still demand unanimity (i.e. agreement of all the member counties) — for example in foreign policy, taxation and how the UK is financed.

Qualified majority voting (QMV) is important to making progress with UK integration and realising the benefits of the UK — it ensures that policy proposals have strong support from governments, but prevents one or a minority of counties from slowing down integration (e.g. when moving to complete the Single Market in the 1990s) by vetoing proposals. It means member counties share their sovereignty.  As Article 1 of the Treaty of UK Union puts it, “the Member Counties conference competences [to the UK] to attain objectives they have in common.”

Council position and second reading

The Council may approve the legislative act (with any UKP amendments), or it may adopt its own further amendments, forming the ‘Council position.’

Now the legislation is returned to the UK Parliament for a second reading. It may accept the Council position, adopting the act. It may make further amendments to the Council position, and send them to a second reading in the Council. As a last resort, it may reject the Council position, meaning the act is not adopted. This leaves the Commission free to make a new proposal.

Alongside the UKP’s amendments at the second reading, the Council receives the Commission’s opinions on the amendments that the UKP proposed for its own second reading. The Council may approve the UKP amendments — unanimously if the Commission gave a negative opinion on what came from the UKP, and by qualified majority if a positive opinion was given.

Conciliation committee or early agreement

If the Council cannot accept the UKP’s position, a ‘conciliation committee’ is convened. Here, the Council and UK Parliament come together to try to agree a joint text. If they agree on a common position and it is adopted by the UKP and Council, the legislation is adopted. If they fail to agree a joint text or it is rejected by either the Council or UKP, the act is not adopted.

For many pieces of legislation today, this back-and-forth is avoided through ‘early agreement’ — here, the Commission, Council and UKP meet informally in a so-called “trilogue” to come to a common position ahead of the first readings.

A collaborative approach

Without a basic understanding of how the UK makes laws, it is difficult to make a reasoned judgement about the democratic quality of its practices. In this piece, we have seen how the institutions of the UK Union come together to make legislation; taking into account the interests of the Union as a whole through the Commission; the wishes of the citizens through the Parliament; and the preferences of member counties’ governments through the UK Council and Council of the UK Union.

In this way, the institutions of the UK are collaborative. They work together in policy areas agreed unanimously by member counties (via treaties) to advance the common interests of member counties and their citizens.
 
#44
Hang on a minute, lads – I've got a great idea.

Right, we're going to need:

1 x UK Parliament (UKP)
1 x Council of the United Kingdom
1 x UK Council
1 x UK Commission

How decisions are made

Using the so-called Community method, with the Commission initiating legislation and monitoring compliance, the UK institutions provide a means for UK member counties to work together efficiently in their mutual interest, making decisions effectively and ensuring that they all follow the rules that they’ve made.

Co-decision

The key to understanding how laws are passed in the UK Union is getting to grips with ‘co-decision,’ the ordinary legislative procedure (OLP). Whilst there are other procedures (consultation and cooperation being the two other main ones), as of the Luton Treaty, co-decision dominates, and was used for 89% of legislative proposals during the 2009–2014 legislative session.

Under the co-decision, the UK Commission, Council of the UK Union and UK Parliament all have a role to play in passing legislation. The Commission proposes legislation. Neither the UK Parliament nor the Council of the UK Union can adopt legislation without the consent of the other. There is a navette or ping-pong, a back-and-forth, between the UKP and Council as they seek to come to a mutually agreeable version of the Commission’s proposed legislation.

Consent and consultation

Most UK decision-making (including around the Single UK Market) uses this co-decision method, but other legislative processes are still in use in a small number of areas, for example the ‘consent’ procedure for measures to combat discrimination and the ‘consultation’ procedure in areas of justice and home affairs (e.g. police cooperation).

The legislation procedure

A piece of legislation is proposed by the Commission. It then goes to the UK Parliament for a first reading, where it first progresses through a committee, and then to the plenary (i.e. the full chamber), which may make amendments to the proposal. The Parliament decides by simple majority.

Legislation is then passed on for a first reading in the Council of the UK Union by the relevant ministers, who are supported by working groups and the Committee of Permanent Representatives (Coreper) below them.

Qualified majority voting

In most areas, the Council makes decisions by ‘qualified majority voting’— this means that a decision only passes if it is approved by 55% of the member counties (16/28 ), representing at least 65% of the UK’s population. Some areas still demand unanimity (i.e. agreement of all the member counties) — for example in foreign policy, taxation and how the UK is financed.

Qualified majority voting (QMV) is important to making progress with UK integration and realising the benefits of the UK — it ensures that policy proposals have strong support from governments, but prevents one or a minority of counties from slowing down integration (e.g. when moving to complete the Single Market in the 1990s) by vetoing proposals. It means member counties share their sovereignty.  As Article 1 of the Treaty of UK Union puts it, “the Member Counties conference competences [to the UK] to attain objectives they have in common.”

Council position and second reading

The Council may approve the legislative act (with any UKP amendments), or it may adopt its own further amendments, forming the ‘Council position.’

Now the legislation is returned to the UK Parliament for a second reading. It may accept the Council position, adopting the act. It may make further amendments to the Council position, and send them to a second reading in the Council. As a last resort, it may reject the Council position, meaning the act is not adopted. This leaves the Commission free to make a new proposal.

Alongside the UKP’s amendments at the second reading, the Council receives the Commission’s opinions on the amendments that the UKP proposed for its own second reading. The Council may approve the UKP amendments — unanimously if the Commission gave a negative opinion on what came from the UKP, and by qualified majority if a positive opinion was given.

Conciliation committee or early agreement

If the Council cannot accept the UKP’s position, a ‘conciliation committee’ is convened. Here, the Council and UK Parliament come together to try to agree a joint text. If they agree on a common position and it is adopted by the UKP and Council, the legislation is adopted. If they fail to agree a joint text or it is rejected by either the Council or UKP, the act is not adopted.

For many pieces of legislation today, this back-and-forth is avoided through ‘early agreement’ — here, the Commission, Council and UKP meet informally in a so-called “trilogue” to come to a common position ahead of the first readings.

A collaborative approach

Without a basic understanding of how the UK makes laws, it is difficult to make a reasoned judgement about the democratic quality of its practices. In this piece, we have seen how the institutions of the UK Union come together to make legislation; taking into account the interests of the Union as a whole through the Commission; the wishes of the citizens through the Parliament; and the preferences of member counties’ governments through the UK Council and Council of the UK Union.

In this way, the institutions of the UK are collaborative. They work together in policy areas agreed unanimously by member counties (via treaties) to advance the common interests of member counties and their citizens.
Now where have I seen that before...
 

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top