Girls of 13 Given Contraceptive Implants by NHS

#1
Story here.

Thoughts on this?

My initial reaction is: Good, if they're going to have sex then at least they're not going to add recipients to the welfare rolls when they do it. But at 13?

Maybe the NHS should not refuse them as such. But if the parents haven't managed to teach them good sense or morality, then perhaps counseling them to reconsider should be part of the NHS's responsibility as well? I'm not sure that some of these girls' parents would be too bent out of shape to find out they were having sex, anyway. They're getting these behaviors from somewhere, after all.

Should the parents be notified? Should they have to give permission?

I also can't help wondering if someone should ask these girls how old the partners that are directing them to go get on birth control are... :?
 
#2
I reckon the implants would have been better off in the parents of the recipients....but time travel hasn't been invented yet.
 
#3
In itself the idea of preventing further teenage pregnancies and more children being brought up in less than ideal circumstances is to be commended, however the fact that children can be prescribed long lasting medication without there parents knowing about it is cause for concern.

The contraceptive they are prescribing does not in any way protect agaisnt any STD so are we merely replacing a pregnancy boom with an STI boom ?

The other question to be asked is who is having sex with 13 year old girls LJH cant be everywhere can he ?
 
#4
What about trying some good parenting for 13 year olds instead. Ahh, I see the problem - getting good parents. What is classed as a good stable family these days?
 
#5
I would like to see a map of the areas where the most are, useing contraception is better than having loads of pregnant chavettes walking around town.
 
#6
Oberleutnant_vn_Genschler said:
What about trying some good parenting for 13 year olds instead. Ahh, I see the problem - getting good parents. What is classed as a good stable family these days?
I dont think you need tp have a defined stable family children can be turned into good adults by grandparents, foster parents, Aunts/Uncles and single parents as effectibvely as they can by the traditonal married couple where Mum stays at home and Dad works 9-5. However IMHO what kids do need is three things, discipline, time with parent figures and a sense of right and wrong.

Having said that i may be wrong ask me in a few years when my little un has grown up.
 
#7
Alternatively, we could stipulate that large quantities of bromide be put into Hooch and White Lightning etc.
 
#10
Making sure the girls don't get pregnant is all good but education of under aged sex and STD's would be better.

Weird how people are more worried about the child getting pregnant that actually becoming HIV.
 
#11
I think this is a double edged sword, good, teenagers are having enough sense to get birth control, bad, theyre having sex at all, it's a lose - lose situation, theyre going to do it anyway so if they've counterd the risk of unwanted pregnancy then it's a plus, on the other hand as previously stated, there's the HIV risk and the moral side of things to consider I'm on the fence with this one. ( I do blame the parents though!)
edit: There is the law to consider, if these kids are having sex then they are breaking the law and surely this has to be reported to the police. I'm not sure if this is covered in medical confidentiality, maybe a medic could advise?
 
#12
Don't see anything wrong with the injection, similar to the pill but you get a shot in the arrse every 3 months, if they are on the pill to regulate periods why not? You can stop it anytime you change your mind, but implants?? Why don't they just take them along to the local materity ward and make them watch the whole process of giving birth with NO painkillers (just to add more effect), doubt they'd be so eager to forget contraceptives then.
 
#13
I think education of underage girls is unrealistic. They aren't old enough to comprehend the implications of their action beyond pregnancy. To act, preventing this is a first step. Step two is then educating them at each visit to the Family Planning. Basic education and a program on understanding their actions.

Beebs
 
#14
We have a Government that allows 13 year old girls to have contraceptive implants without parental consent or knowledge, but threatens the same parents with legal action if they take their kids on holiday in term time. I am the only one on this site that thinks something is very wrong here.
 
#16
mushroom said:
We have a Government that allows 13 year old girls to have contraceptive implants without parental consent or knowledge, but threatens the same parents with legal action if they take their kids on holiday in term time. I am the only one on this site that thinks something is very wrong here.
I don't see anything wrong with it. If the government took my suggestions seriously two thirds of the population would be sterilised on the grounds of being unfit to reproduce. The last thing we need are more chav scumbags spongeing off the taxpayer. contraception is a solution (albeit a soft one). If parents don't like it they should have brought little britney/chelsea/frogmella up properly. Then she would be playing with dollies rather than ****ing chesney/Dwayne/Brooklyn.
 
#17
Two issues m'Laird.

Children being given drugs without parental consent, whilst the same Government attempts to solve other problems by holding the parents responsible.

How to cut the number of teenage pregnancies.

Either parents are responsible for their children or they are not. If we are going to hold them responsible then the parents must be involved with the administration of any drugs.

I tend to agree with your view on compulsory sterilisation of all chavs.
 
#18
There are several issues here.

1. Should a female (of reproductive age) get contraception - IMHO Yes, without question.
2. If they are under the age of 16 should their parents be informed - IMHO No, provided the child is mentally capable of making decision, to have contraception, this is the clinicians judgement. In addition the child should (and I understand would) be warned about STDs, the legality of under-aged sex etc.
3. Medical Ethics, should the clinician report that a crime (underage sex is still a criminal offence) has been committed - Difficult Call.
4. If as a parent you find that you under-aged daughter has been prescribed contraceptives, do you:

a. Blame the child
b. The clinician
c. The boyfriend
d. Yourself

IMHO - It has to be D, on the grounds that they felt they had to bypass you and see the clinician.

If you answer is A-C I would suggest that the child is better off with the conceptive than without.

My wife and discussed this a while ago and agreed to disagreed on question 1 BUT both agreed that 4.d. is indicative of caring parents.
 
#19
Moral and parental issues aside - surely this is a good thing. At least it may reduce the alarming rate at which the chav mongs reproduce..................

Burberry may see a subsequent downturn in turnover.....
 
#20
dog_soldier said:
Moral and parental issues aside - surely this is a good thing. At least it may reduce the alarming rate at which the chav mongs reproduce..................

Burberry may see a subsequent downturn in turnover.....

I thought that had already happened since the Chavs started wearing it, nobody normal in their right mind now will have anything to do with it.

Sparky
 

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