Gimson's Kings & Queens: Brief Lives of the Monarchs since 1066

Gimson's Kings & Queens: Brief Lives of the Monarchs since 1066

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Auld-Yin submitted a new resource:

Gimson's Kings & Queens: Brief Lives of the Monarchs since 1066 - Brief Lives of the Monarchs since 1066

Like its companion-volume, Gimson's Prime Ministers: Brief Lives from Walpole to May, reviewed for ARRSE in April 2018, this is a handsome hardback volume in a handy size (A5). If you are looking for a birthday present for an intelligent and historically-aware person, this book should definitely be a candidate. At £10.99 RRP, but costing less from Amazon; it represents value for money. As with Gimson's Prime Ministers, my main complaint is that there is no index or bibliography.

There are...
Read more about this resource...
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Once again, just like to point out this is a review by @metellus cimber II and I only posted it for him.
 
It always intrigues me why, in the vast majority of cases, any history of English monarchs seems to start with their defeat by the Normans in 1066AD, rather than with Aethelstan in 927AD, although that then adds the Norwegians and Danes to the list to join the Normans, French, Scots, Dutch (and Germans in the United Kingdom).
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
When I put away childish things one of the throwouts was a small book with one monarch to a page, with a cartoonish picture and a suitable crisp quatrain. All I remember now is the second half of the verse for Charles II:

'He did not worry overmuch
When up the Medway sailed the Dutch.'
 

metellus cimber II

Crow
Book Reviewer
metellus cimber II updated Gimson's Kings & Queens: Brief Lives of the Monarchs since 1066 with a new update entry:

Why 1066?

I asked Gimson's publishers why the arbitrary date of 1066 was chosen for the start of this book. The answer was that long ago England's, and later Great Britain's, monarchs started numbering themselves from that date. So ,although there were at least two Anglo-Saxon Kings called Edward, they do not have numerals. They were: Edward, King and Martyr and Edward the Confessor. So Edward Plantagenet (1272-1307) is regarded as "Edward I". Moreover, if the old Saxon and Danish Kings had been...
Read the rest of this update entry...
 

Latest Threads

Top