Getting yourself Micro chipped.

We can't get peeps to carry id cards, fat chance of chipping
 
A more relevant objection is just that the technology isn't very good, and there is an awful lot of it to do even the simplest thing once you start to get "smart". Such as your broadband is down and your smart lock can't talk to the cloud and now you can't get into your house and you gave up your old fashioned physical key in favour of a chip because the only objections were "emotive"...
Wayhey a grown up answer! :D

The answer to local connectivity issues is that the lock can be set to respond to a set series of numbers, indeed it is likely it wouldn't need connectivity. Lets not forget that a chip will only contain an ID number. Where as @FORMER_FYRDMAN, and others seems to think it will include all personal details, utterly ignoring the fact that all the things he is worried about is already connected to the internet, its just locked away behind sufficient security.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
If power companies cant get something as simple as a 'smart meter' to work properly nationally, I think this is a long way off from being rolled out to the great unwashed.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
I say go ahead, one person, one chip, it'll cut down on a lot of fraud in the DWP where multi IDs are common place, also can be used in NHS hospitals (Vets have the kit to read them linked to their computers, so no reason why hospitals can't) to see if you're eligible for full on NHS treatment, if no chip, just emergency treatment it is thereby stopping a lot of fraud again.
one fcuking chip you mean.

given to you in a sausage by ex ACC types.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Wayhey a grown up answer! :D

The answer to local connectivity issues is that the lock can be set to respond to a set series of numbers, indeed it is likely it wouldn't need connectivity. Lets not forget that a chip will only contain an ID number. Where as @FORMER_FYRDMAN, and others seems to think it will include all personal details, utterly ignoring the fact that all the things he is worried about is already connected to the internet, its just locked away behind sufficient security.
Everybody's personal data has always existed somewhere, even as paper records. The question is about making it difficult to access a complete individual data set at one fell swoop - an ID number will grant access to data otherwise what's the point of it?
 
Everybody's personal data has always existed somewhere, even as paper records. The question is about making it difficult to access a complete individual data set at one fell swoop - an ID number will grant access to data otherwise what's the point of it?
I know this may come as an upsetting shock for you, but most, if not all of those records are now electronic, and reachable through the internet.

Edit:
Let me expand a bit. You would not have them all on one database either. Instead of multiple databases linked to multiple cards, you'd have multiple databases linked to one card. These relevant databases could only be read by the right person.
For example the Police man who has stopped you, scans your card, and it gives back police info, name, address, Driving licence details and similar, basically stuff they'd find on PNC/PND.
They wouldn't get access to the NHS SCR.
 
Trouble is it makes big brother more aware of where and what you are doing the more technology you use the more big brother can watch you. Some times technology can go wrong I have a iPhone that uses facial recognition it work when I have my glasses on but not when I take them off. My twin brother can open my phone and I can open his. Now we are identical but his ugly mug has a badly set broken nose whilst mine is intact. When we next meet up we are going to try finger prints on our iPads to see what happens. Since we clocked it with the iPhone we sacked it and use pass codes now. One big fail was when he logged on to my Barclays app using facial recognition sadly he would not let me try his as I thinks I would have borrowed a few bob.
 
A more relevant objection is just that the technology isn't very good, and there is an awful lot of it to do even the simplest thing once you start to get "smart". Such as your broadband is down and your smart lock can't talk to the cloud and now you can't get into your house and you gave up your old fashioned physical key in favour of a chip because the only objections were "emotive"...
On the other hand, it might cut down on the use of sock accounts.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
I do wonder - thousands of people go missing every year often on purpose.

something than is planted can be replanted as per lots of sci fi plots.

which film was it where they have a pair of eyes in sandwich bag to give someone a clean identity?.

while part of me agrees with us being chipped for census and medical data so we can deport the 7 million we don't want here better fingerprint, earprint and facial software should be enough.

everything can be abused and a chip like a phone can used to control people - like the track and trace apps or health passports.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
I know this may come as an upsetting shock for you, but most, if not all of those records are now electronic, and reachable through the internet.
Every record ever created has been reachable - it's only ever been a question of how much effort has been required to reach it. Personally I'm in favour of making it challenging, you clearly are not.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
I personally am pay as you go, with everything turned of as I move around however I take your point. Again my objection is data theft, not government oppression.



There in lies the problem, you carry your data around, your medical records, someone steals thats, gets your data and then gets free medical treatment, thats going to be a big winning scam in the future.
Except when your medical records state that due to Diabetes, you'll be having an amputation from the knees down or when scanned it turns out that Mr N'bongwe Blessed doesn't quite match the picture on the screen!
1590060877864.png
 
What happens when firms change IT systems are we going to end up with loads of pointless microchips on us with out of date information?
 
Who makes money out of big data? How does it help me? Why should I allow my details to be freely available on the www? As I read of another data breach (An airline this time.) I have to wonder when it will be safe to use this device without risk. If my data is so important when will someone pay me for it? I just don’t want to, is that a good enough reason not to use it?
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
I know this may come as an upsetting shock for you, but most, if not all of those records are now electronic, and reachable through the internet.

Edit:
Let me expand a bit. You would not have them all on one database either. Instead of multiple databases linked to multiple cards, you'd have multiple databases linked to one card. These relevant databases could only be read by the right person.
For example the Police man who has stopped you, scans your card, and it gives back police info, name, address, Driving licence details and similar, basically stuff they'd find on PNC/PND.
They wouldn't get access to the NHS SCR.
We're not talking about cards, we're talking about a microchip inserted into your body which is accessible to anyone with the right equipment, whether you give your permission or not.

To quote you: "the Police man who has stopped you, scans your card, and it gives back police info, name, address, Driving licence details and similar, basically stuff they'd find on PNC/PND." With a microchip, the police wouldn't need to stop you and you wouldn't even know you'd been pinged unless they decided to tell you. I can see why that could be extremely useful in law enforcement - better targeted stop and search for a start - but I can also see how it could end up being seriously abused.

Who decides who the 'right person' is and how do you police the Chinese Walls between the data sets?
 
And how will they work with GDPR, how will people be able to check that the data is valid and up to date, and how will they be able to get missing or incorrect data amended?
 
We can't get peeps to carry id cards, fat chance of chipping
Therein lies another drawback - where do you put the chip so that Georgy Porgy doesn't bury it in mountains of lardy-ass obesity?

You would need a standardised non-fatty location on people I guess. Ears might do - apart from lugless Douglas of course...
 
The odds of a thug slicing my arm off to get my personal info from a chip will be zilch, the odds of a thug stabbing me to get the same info verbally is exactly the same but that doesn't mean I don't go out without my phone or wallet.

If I were to kill someone I fully expect Law Enforcement to track my recent movements by any means necessary whether that be mobile phone or internet use. However, I know this and can make attempts to create a false story and mask my movements, chopping off a limb to do the same maybe not.

But what if I won the national lottery, my grinner getting plastered all over the place along with a raised middle finger, the odds of meeting a thug becomes waaaay higher.

So a few things spring to mind;

The problem isn't what the chip can do it's the trust in that technology that needs addressing.

The more valuable the info the plot to steal that info becomes a hackers mission in life, it's the way of the world.

If somebody wants to steal your info, chip or no chip they WILL get it.

I have developed a Titanium Tin Foil armband using molecular technology making them impervious to Governments, Thugs, or Alien surveillance. Currently available at a discount for all Arrsers who PM me valid ID & Bank details.
 
We're not talking about cards, we're talking about a microchip inserted into your body which is accessible to anyone with the right equipment, whether you give your permission or not.

To quote you: "the Police man who has stopped you, scans your card, and it gives back police info, name, address, Driving licence details and similar, basically stuff they'd find on PNC/PND." With a microchip, the police wouldn't need to stop you and you wouldn't even know you'd been pinged unless they decided to tell you. I can see why that could be extremely useful in law enforcement - better targeted stop and search for a start - but I can also see how it could end up being seriously abused.

Who decides who the 'right person' is and how do you police the Chinese Walls between the data sets?
Right I see a slight point of divergence.

I'm talking about microchips such as the ones used on animals at current, which can only be read when in physical contact with a reader.
You're talking about some weird thing that can be scanned from afar, even with biocells I suspect those would lack the power to transmit very far.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Right I see a slight point of divergence.

I'm talking about microchips such as the ones used on animals at current, which can only be read when in physical contact with a reader.
You're talking about some weird thing that can be scanned from afar, even with biocells I suspect those would lack the power to transmit very far.
Technology develops. The critical principle is that, officially at least, access to my data currently requires my active consent at some point in the process - having a compulsory microchip on uncontrollable permasend materially changes that dynamic.
 
As Dave Asprey says, you can't turn these chips off.
Are RFID Chip Implants the Future? What You Should Know About This Biohacking Trend Are RFID Chip Implants the Future? What You Should Know About This Biohacking Trend

Of course these chips will have a unique ID and can't be cloned...except they can.
https://www.blackhat.com/presentations/bh-dc-08/Laurie/Presentation/bh-dc-08-laurie.pdf
Somewhere there is video of Adam cloning a chip that Larry Pesce had implanted in his hand.

If you really want to go ahead and chip yourself, you can get the kit here: RFID & NFC human chip implants | Biohacking
 

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