Getting utterly shitfaced in Cromwell's Army

Alehouse Characters Christmas Special: The Festive Binge-Drinker

On 26th December—St Stephen’s Day, later to become Boxing Day—Eyre’s horse had a minor fall when trying to leap over a muddy ditch. As Eyre sought to regain his composure he encountered a fellow officer in the Parliamentary army, Corporal Richard Barber, who persuaded Adam to take a restorative draft of ale or two in an alehouse in nearby Thurlstone. Eyre spent 4 pence (the standard measure of ale then was a quart, or two pints, and this typically cost 2p: so it was a penny a pint).


Any room at the inn?

That was not the end of things. They then travelled on to Cawthorne, and there consumed a further 6 pence worth of ale. They were beginning to enjoy themselves, and went and called on some more of their army pals, and the enlarged company ventured on to Netherton, where they no doubt stopped for a quick pint to keep their spirits up, before ending up at Widow Thorpe’s alehouse in Bradford, where Eyre consumed another 6 pence worth. Eyre had covered the best part of 28 miles and imbibed as many as 18 pints of ale on this epic pub crawl
 
The whole thing reminded me of the "Squaddies trying to behave like proper people" thread. Also, the clash with all the dead serious, sad broadcloth uniforms, Hugh Peters leading the prayers stuff is great. "Praise the Lord, but pass the ammunition...I think it's your round Adam?"
 
I bet when he woke up in the morning a gorilla had visited his room, spread his clothes all over the place, puked in the sink and nicked all the money from his wallet!
 

Blogg

LE
"...not a destitute peasant bent on narcotic oblivion, nor a puritanical fundamentalist, but an individual with an ambiguous and complicated relationship to the intoxicants that pervaded his society."

Sounds dreadfully familiar.....
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
I bet when he woke up in the morning a gorilla had visited his room, spread his clothes all over the place, puked in the sink and nicked all the money from his wallet!

First heard that in Bulford in 1979.
 
First heard that in Bulford in 1979.
I'm sure that squaddies throughout the ages have used similar excuses for the state of their rooms on a Sunday morning. I hope that somewhere in one of the forts on Hadrian's wall, there is some squaddie grafiti complaining about some painted Celt visiting and doing the same as the gorilla!
 
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I hate it when writers refer to enlisted personnel as officers.
 
A thought. Eyre and co drank their way from Penistone to Bradford. We know he starred off with a horse. Does this mean he was less dangerous on horseback drunk?
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
A thought. Eyre and co drank their way from Penistone to Bradford. We know he starred off with a horse. Does this mean he was less dangerous on horseback drunk?
He'd be fine if the horse was sober. It could even have taken him home asleep if needs be.
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
I don’t know about Cromwell s army but I recon Wellington s army was pretty pissed too. Them musket s were more accurate than we thought - they just couldn’t see!

A Soldier's Daily Ration

The daily rations issued to each soldier in the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars were as follows:
1½ lbs Bread or Flour, or 1 lb of Ship’s Biscuit
1 lb Beef, or ½ lb Pork
¼ pint Dried Peas
1 oz Cheese or Butter
1 oz Rice
5 pints Small Beer, or 1 pint Wine, or ½ pint Spirits
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
I don’t know about Cromwell s army but I recon Wellington s army was pretty pissed too. Them musket s were more accurate than we thought - they just couldn’t see!

A Soldier's Daily Ration

The daily rations issued to each soldier in the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars were as follows:
1½ lbs Bread or Flour, or 1 lb of Ship’s Biscuit
1 lb Beef, or ½ lb Pork
¼ pint Dried Peas
1 oz Cheese or Butter
1 oz Rice
5 pints Small Beer, or 1 pint Wine, or ½ pint Spirits
Small beer was less than 2% alcohol. It's what is brewed from the spent grain of the proper brew, but is healthier than water because it has been boiled.

In a similar vein in my days in East Germany Soviet soldiers were issued with tins of fish-heads.
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
Small beer was less than 2% alcohol. It's what is brewed from the spent grain of the proper brew, but is healthier than water because it has been boiled.

In a similar vein in my days in East Germany Soviet soldiers were issued with tins of fish-heads.
The half a pint of spirit would have slayed me!
 
The half a pint of spirit would have slayed me!
Not if you'd spread it out over the day. Same as the small beer, safer than the water to drink. They'd possibly water the spirit down, with the small beer. The hard tac biscuits would probably have been soaked in some of the beer to soften them down.
 
One of my bosses in the army used to do the sealed knot thing - started out as a pike man, made it up to musket man. He was handed a copy of some kind of drill manual from back in Cromwells day and never looked back, his pace stick quivered at the opportunity to escape from the cupboard in the spare room.

He used to take us along to some of their quaffing training sessions, fcek me could they put it away at night. Then next day on the 'pretend' battlefield they would kick 7 bales out of each other to work off the hangovers.
 
Does it say anything about peeing in other people's lockers when sh!t faced? Just asking . . .

Sent from my SM-N910F using Tapatalk
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
One of my bosses in the army used to do the sealed knot thing - started out as a pike man, made it up to musket man. He was handed a copy of some kind of drill manual from back in Cromwells day and never looked back, his pace stick quivered at the opportunity to escape from the cupboard in the spare room.

He used to take us along to some of their quaffing training sessions, fcek me could they put it away at night. Then next day on the 'pretend' battlefield they would kick 7 bales out of each other to work off the hangovers.
I did that, too. Made Cpl in the Marquis of Newcastle's Regiment of Foote in 1975. Then I joined the Regulars.

The SK was set up by Brig Peter Young (did D-Day, taught at Sandhurst) in 1968. I took my Platoon to a do in Plymouth and had a bit of a drama which led me to be marched in front of him. He let me off and agreed the chap deserved to lose a tooth.

Sealed Knot founder Young honoured

YOUNG, Peter (Brig)

Top bloke.
 

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