Getting an Irish passport / Claiming Irish Citizenship

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
#41
Creed, colour, name doesn't matter. If you see nationality as a convenience stick with it, but I see you as lacking commitment. When citizenship ceases to have value it ceases to engender loyalty and service
When your country ceases to value your citizenship and turns it over to a miasma of bullshitters and carpetbaggers.

Ask not what you have done for your country. Ask what your country has ever done for you.

And yes I’m returning to the use of dual passports, an activity I thought long behind me. It has little bearing on my loyalty. Convenience has a great deal to do with it. I don’t mind stepping up for a cause or a good idea.

Brexit isn’t it. And for me the inconvenience will be minor. I wish it were so for everyone else but I doubt it.
Carry on comrade.
 
#42
Ireland will be unrecognisable in twenty years, I,ve been here since 1970 and in that space of time it has gone from third world to an up your arse place (thanks to celtic tiger) from the bog to the computer in one generation.
 
#43
I can’t foresee any issues with tourists (eg a requirement for entry visas etc)

Moving to work in the EU possibly and will probably based on a reciprocal of whatever the UK introduce or at least along those lines
The way things are progressing at the moment with the government, Parliament and various factions of the political parties, particularly the Tories, playing their various games over Brexit, I think all bets are off on what the end outcome will actually be.

I’ve not seen such a dogs dinner of politics being played out for many years and I’ve been involved in politics in a previous role.

I have no confidence whatsoever that ordinary people will benefit at all from this charade. I genuinely worry about what the future holds for my children and my grandchildren.
 
#44
Were there many problems for British passport holders travelling throuhout Europe prior to 1973, our entrance to the EEC?
 
#45
Ireland will be unrecognisable in twenty years, I,ve been here since 1970 and in that space of time it has gone from third world to an up your arse place (thanks to celtic tiger) from the bog to the computer in one generation.
Well it's a good thing I'm just after citizenship and a passport, not living there ;)
 
#46
I can’t foresee any issues with tourists (eg a requirement for entry visas etc)

Moving to work in the EU possibly and will probably based on a reciprocal of whatever the UK introduce or at least along those lines
This is what all the youngsters are worried about. Having to potentially deal with stuff like visas and work permits for moving, living, studying etc. in EU. I personally know of a couple of Aussie and Kiwi friends who are thinking twice about applying for a UK passport (they are eligible for it) because of Brexit's uncertainty. It's ok for all the oldish farts who voted to leave don't have to deal with this mess.

Just plain visiting shouldn't be effected.
 
#48
Were there many problems for British passport holders travelling throuhout Europe prior to 1973, our entrance to the EEC?
No, which is why I question that we will need visas etc after Brexit.
There were some hurdles to jump through, work permits for example.
But most people travelled around Europe with no problems at all and, I suggest, will continue to do so despite some of the rhetoric going on.
There are already problems (red tape) hurdles to cross even with membership like registering your stay and proving you have sufficient funds and medical care if you want to stay in the country.
In Spain, they have recently introduced rules requiring a permit if you want to rent out your property (for all nationalities, not just Brits) and, if you do rent it out, you have to provide passport details of everyone to the National Police (the ones responsible for borders) and that also applies to anyone, EU citizen or not.
Mind you, the main reason is the number of people who rent it out with no fire escapes, no smoke alarms and so on plus not declaring the income for tax purposes.
So, no, there were no problems travelling (apart from showing your passport at every border) and I'm pretty sure (IMHO) that will continue for tourists in the future.
After all, the second largest number of tourists to Spain are Brits (French the most with Germany just behind UK) and the second largest amount of visitors to France (after Germans) and they won't want to lose that income.

ETA:
Getting through airports may be a bit more difficult on the initial landing with more stringent passport checks. Air travel was not so common in the 60s so it would be difficult to compare,
 
Last edited:
#49
No, which is why I question that we will need visas etc after Brexit.
There were some hurdles to jump through, work permits for example.
But most people travelled around Europe with no problems at all and, I suggest, will continue to do so despite some of the rhetoric going on.
There are already problems (red tape) hurdles to cross even with membership like registering your stay and proving you have sufficient funds and medical care if you want to stay in the country.
In Spain, they have recently introduced rules requiring a permit if you want to rent out your property (for all nationalities, not just Brits) and, if you do rent it out, you have to provide passport details of everyone to the National Police (the ones responsible for borders) and that also applies to anyone, EU citizen or not.
Mind you, the main reason is the number of people who rent it out with no fire escapes, no smoke alarms and so on plus not declaring the income for tax purposes.
So, no, there were no problems travelling (apart from showing your passport at every border) and I'm pretty sure (IMHO) that will continue for tourists in the future.
After all, the second largest number of tourists to Spain are Brits (French the most with Germany just behind UK) and the second largest amount of visitors to France (after Germans) and they won't want to lose that income.

ETA:
Getting through airports may be a bit more difficult on the initial landing with more stringent passport checks. Air travel was not so common in the 60s so it would be difficult to compare,
There are many more millions travelling compared to 1973.

Imho whatever the EU is likely to be based on what the UK introduce.

Will taking back the borders mean restricting Durations of stay etc, will it mean visas etc
 
#50
There are many more millions travelling compared to 1973.

Imho whatever the EU is likely to be based on what the UK introduce.

Will taking back the borders mean restricting Durations of stay etc, will it mean visas etc

There's already a restriction on stay of up to 3 months. It's not really enforced for EU citizens unless you try to access things like health services, work, buying property etc when you have to formalise your status (register of foreign EU citizens for EU nationals or a long-term visa for people from most non-EU countries.
At least 3 month visa free travel would be on the cards with, maybe, a long stay visa requirement after that.
All depending on any agreements made (if our negotiators ever bother turning up for the meetings).
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
#51
Were there many problems for British passport holders travelling throuhout Europe prior to 1973, our entrance to the EEC?
Parents did a lot of travel they never seemed to get any bother. Even the states, there’s a bit where they ask on the form if you’re there to overthrow the government. Dad used to write, ‘sole purpose of visit’ and everyone laughed.
Not now.
I still get warned in airports. ‘No funny stuff’
 

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