Getting an Irish passport / Claiming Irish Citizenship

#23
Because citizenship should be something that comes with responsibilities and not just be an insurance policy in case your own country goes tits up - see all the "British" evacuees from Lebanon a few years ago, or a way of avoiding some difficult paperwork or having to go home.
I think Queen Victoria and the British Empire want's you back. And what about that uppity Australian Rupert Murdoch who took American citizenship for business purposes as I understand it.

Another example is Boris Johnson who was an American passport holder until he renounced American citizenship a couple of years ago. That wasn't because he realised that it was his patriotic duty to the UK to do so. It was so he wouldn't be liable for American taxes.

I've been considering applying for Irish citizenship for some time. I think once Brexit is complete, travel in Europe will become more problematic for UK citizens. Even small barriers can be a bureaucratic and complex irritation and if gaining an Irish passport keeps it simple, why not do it?

I also have Irish roots. My grandfather is from County Kerry. I've seen the cottage he was born in, mud floors and all etc and as a child, I was taken on holidays to Castleisland several times to see the relatives who still lived there.

Gaining an Irish passport doesn't make me any less of a UK citizen. I've served my country and I'm not running away from it now although my age might make me more of a burden than an asset these days. It's just not at all unusual for people to hold dual citizenship.

An Irish passport if you are entitled to one is simply a lawful way of continuing to enjoy travel in the EU without the cumbersome hurdles that will appear once we have left the club. That works for me.
 
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#24
Thread drift

Does anyone know that applying for Irish nationality would make you eligible to apply for the US green card lottery, or is its requirement based on place of birth as opposed to nationality?
 
#25
Just found this:

"When participating in the Green Card Lottery your birth country, according to current borders, is more relevant than the country of your citizenship. Your birth country is independent from the citizenship you have, for example the citizenship stated in your passport. Over the last few decades, international country borders have experienced much change and your birth country is according to current borders. There would be too many individual cases to review, so the US authorities make no exceptions. To participate in the Green Card Lottery, please provide your birth country. In case you win, your country of citizenship will then become relevant."

So the answer is no! :mad::x
 
#26
Because citizenship should be something that comes with responsibilities and not just be an insurance policy in case your own country goes tits up - see all the "British" evacuees from Lebanon a few years ago, or a way of avoiding some difficult paperwork or having to go home.
Are you including in that all those poor buggers born to British CS on foreign service during the last days of the empire, who found themselves considered ‘foreigners’ in their old age because they happened to be born in India?

I’m eligible, and I may get one simply because, as others have posted, it can make life easier in some places. It has no bearing on my allegiance whatsoever.
 
#27
Sadly my Great Grandfather was born in Ireland so I am ineligible, despite my Irish surname!
Don't give up all hope just yet.....if he came from Mayo he might be your grandad as well, so you might still be eligible.

Just to add to a proper ARRSE game of top trumps. I inquired last year if my artist's exemption still stood from years back, it does. Took an age to wangle in the first place so that is nice to have tucked in my back pocket.

The way this country is going I can see myself sodding off there sometime. A few years of tax free working while drifting into semi retirement with some proper fishing to be done seems more and more attractive. Never liked hot sunny weather much anyway.
 
#28
It does seem to take ages to get this FBR registration and no two applications are the same, depending on the detail of information submitted some have cited on other sites such as immigration boards as little as 3-4 months whilst some are still waiting on after 7 months.

I'd just be very certain and get it right first time for all those thinking, especially about having documements witness, certified, back of 2 photos etc

I have a feeling mine might well be returned because some documents were certified by my GP and the others a building society manager, I'm guessing only one should have been used.

Will just have to wait out now

Here are guidelines below

Documentary requirements for FBR application
NOTE: CERTIFICATES IN A LANGUAGE OTHER THAN IRISH OR ENGLISH MUST BE
ACCOMPANIED BY A CERTIFIED TRANSLATION.
1 All Sections of the application form must be fully completed. Two passport sized photographs
of the applicant must be supplied, signed and dated by the Witness at Section E
Important Note: The applicant MUST be personally known to the witness at Section E OR
must be identified to the witness by a third party who is personally known to both the applicant
and the witness.

2 At present, applications to the following Missions are excluded from the new online payment
system.
Embassy Abuja
Embassy Addis Ababa
Embassy Dar Es Salaam
Embassy Freetown
Embassy Nairobi
Embassy Maputo
Embassy Malawi
Honorary Consulate Auckland
If you have been instructed on the top right hand corner of your application form to forward
your application to any of these missions/offices then please contact that mission/office directly
or visit their website for information about payment methods.

3 Documents relating to the Applicant(Originals must be submitted):
Full civil birth certificate (giving details of parents)
Civil marriage certificate(s) - Church certificates are NOT acceptable
Certified/Notarized copy of the photograph page of current passport or state issued identity
document (e.g. Driver's Licence)
3 Proofs of address i.e. utility bills, bank statement etc.
Documentary evidence and 2 years proof of usage must be provided for any change of name
(e.g. Change of name by Deed poll)

4 Documents relating to the Parent(Originals must be submitted):
Foreign Births Registration Certificate.
Full civil birth certificate giving details of parents.
Civil marriage certificate(s) - Church certificates are NOT acceptable
If living, Certified/Notarized copy of the photograph page of current passport or state issued
identity document (e.g. Driver's Licence) otherwise civil death certificate
Documentary evidence and 2 years proof of usage must be provided for any change of name
(e.g. Change of name by Deed poll)

Please Note Additional Documentation May be required.
Incomplete or incorrect applications will be returned.
 
#30
As someone who’s entitled to an Irish passport and passed it by, I have to question the loyalty of any serving soldier who goes down that route.

You cannot serve two masters.

The sooner the U.K. makes choosing single nationality compulsory the better.
Maybe become an advantage next year

@chuggafugga alright, so how much commission is the Irish passport office paying you for referrals from this site? ;)
They don’t need to
Brexit aids surge in Irish passport applications

Because citizenship should be something that comes with responsibilities and not just be an insurance policy in case your own country goes tits up - see all the "British" evacuees from Lebanon a few years ago, or a way of avoiding some difficult paperwork or having to go home.
Don’t expect the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs to do much for you overseas
 
#31
Us NI born can apply, irrelevant of religious connotations. I did, using my Irish passport to soujourne around those states such as Cuba tolerating mishap through the London Heathrow / Stanstead checks.
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#32
Define own country. What if you were born in the U.S., but grew up in the UK. What would be defined as own country? Or you spent your life equally in both these countries...?
Pick one. Doing so will clarify your loyalties and your outlook. My views were hardened on this subject at a party in Italy when a bloke working there was shouting the odds about the inefficiencies of the British embassy in helping him sort a problem. He was born in Canada of British parents, had only a British passport, spoke with a Canadian accent and had lived in Canada all of his life in Canada until he moved to London in his late 20s. He lasted 6 months because "it was a terrible place" and moved to Italy. Net contribution to Britain, about 6 months taxes. His passport was a convenience to allow him to work in the EU. He was naturally very anti-brexit and didn't like my views on him much
 

Guns

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#34
As someone who’s entitled to an Irish passport and passed it by, I have to question the loyalty of any serving soldier who goes down that route.

You cannot serve two masters.

The sooner the U.K. makes choosing single nationality compulsory the better.
And of good clean stock as well I imagine.

How the world is passing you by. I have UK, Canadian and (but not officially taken up yet) Irish citizenship. I have my allegiance to Canada as that is where I consider home and I work for the Crown. I got my Canadian citizenship during my exchange job with the RCN and no one questioned my loyalty. Kept my DV and everyone just accepted that and all was good.
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#35
And of good clean stock as well I imagine.

How the world is passing you by. I have UK, Canadian and (but not officially taken up yet) Irish citizenship. I have my allegiance to Canada as that is where I consider home and I work for the Crown. I got my Canadian citizenship during my exchange job with the RCN and no one questioned my loyalty. Kept my DV and everyone just accepted that and all was good.
Creed, colour, name doesn't matter. If you see nationality as a convenience stick with it, but I see you as lacking commitment. When citizenship ceases to have value it ceases to engender loyalty and service
 

Guns

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#36
Creed, colour, name doesn't matter. If you see nationality as a convenience stick with it, but I see you as lacking commitment. When citizenship ceases to have value it ceases to engender loyalty and service
My loyalty is as follows:
Family
Friends

big gap


Manchester United / Ottawa Sens
HM Queen Elizabeth II
The Royal Canadian Navy and my work colleges I like
The Starbucks in the food court over the one in the shopping centre near work because the staff are nicer
Marmite
Any team playing the Leafs or Liverpool

Loyalty is a two way street. The RN saw fit to **** me over so **** them. Yet up to that point I would have said Navy till I die.

I'm loyal to Canada but where there is no conflict I have helped out the UK here in Canada.

What I do not do is wrap myself in a flag and thump my chest. I have learnt through my naval career that nationalism is bad. Pride in ones home is OK but not when you refuse to be critical of your own kind that do wrong.
 
#37
What cumbersome hurdles?
Well if you think the EU are not going to impose conditions on UK citizens entering the EU after we have thumbed our noses up at them, you carry on with your happy dreams about a rosy future.
 
#38
Pick one. Doing so will clarify your loyalties and your outlook. My views were hardened on this subject at a party in Italy when a bloke working there was shouting the odds about the inefficiencies of the British embassy in helping him sort a problem. He was born in Canada of British parents, had only a British passport, spoke with a Canadian accent and had lived in Canada all of his life in Canada until he moved to London in his late 20s. He lasted 6 months because "it was a terrible place" and moved to Italy. Net contribution to Britain, about 6 months taxes. His passport was a convenience to allow him to work in the EU. He was naturally very anti-brexit and didn't like my views on him much
I will disagree with you here and stop making any further comments on the topic as I am afraid we will go around in circles. @Guns has made my views clear in his posts anyways.
 
#39
My loyalty is as follows:
Family
Friends

big gap


Manchester United / Ottawa Sens
HM Queen Elizabeth II
The Royal Canadian Navy and my work colleges I like
The Starbucks in the food court over the one in the shopping centre near work because the staff are nicer
Marmite
Any team playing the Leafs or Liverpool

Loyalty is a two way street. The RN saw fit to **** me over so **** them. Yet up to that point I would have said Navy till I die.

I'm loyal to Canada but where there is no conflict I have helped out the UK here in Canada.

What I do not do is wrap myself in a flag and thump my chest. I have learnt through my naval career that nationalism is bad. Pride in ones home is OK but not when you refuse to be critical of your own kind that do wrong.
A passport is simply a travel document at the end of the day... personally Hitler was Austrian but he loved Germany more it seemed!
 
#40
Well if you think the EU are not going to impose conditions on UK citizens entering the EU after we have thumbed our noses up at them, you carry on with your happy dreams about a rosy future.
I can’t foresee any issues with tourists (eg a requirement for entry visas etc)

Moving to work in the EU possibly and will probably based on a reciprocal of whatever the UK introduce or at least along those lines
 

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