Getting an Irish passport / Claiming Irish Citizenship

#1
I just thought I'd make the denizens of ARRSE aware that acquiring an Irish passport whilst it may seem an arduous and long drawn out process it is actually straight forward.

Just sent off my application to have myself registered in the Irish Foreign Birth Register along with supporting docs including mothers original birth certificate and mine and other bits and if approved will recieve whats known as a "registration certificate"

"An application for Irish citizenship through Foreign Birth Registration (FBR) can be submitted by any person with a grandparent born in any part of Ireland or by any person whose parent received Irish citizenship prior to the birth of the applicant."

You'll get a registration certificate if approved, if any errors you'll have it returned back to you etc if any clarifications required or anything done incorrectly, that process is 278 euros

Sent mine off yesterday and got an "application recieved" e-mail, it does indicate they take ages to process.

There are ways of getting a certified copy of your grandparents birth certificate online.

After you get a copy of your registration certifcate, you can apply for an Irish passport having been classed as a citizen of Ireland.

You never know when having dual citizenship may come in useful
 
#2
Anyone who can, should. Especially with the whole Brexit thing. Plus it's Irish passport, so less hatred (like Canadian, Kiwi passports) in "interesting" climes and places.

Sometimes I wish I could get a Canadian passport as people tend to be nicer to them compared to us Americans. ;)

And now here I am about to get a UK passport sometime next year. It's like double whammy, them having to choose the lesser of the two "evils" to hate upon!
 
#3
The process is long-winded, but straightforward - I submitted my FBR application in Nov last year. In March I had to register my grandparent's birth as the event wasn't in question but there was no official record. That was slightly bizarre, particularly as I have no memory of her as she died when I was a baby, but there you go. My certificate of registration arrived in May giving me dual citizenship from that date, and I applied for a passport last month. It's due to arrive around the end of August.

I agree with @redshift that anyone who can probably should if they want to keep options like living elsewhere in Europe open, for a while at least. I'd add the proviso that anyone who is still serving or is DV, especially if they're in one of the more interesting lines of classified work, should take advice on the implications of dual citizenship before applying.
 
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#4
.....Thanks - I had an Irish gran on my dad's side. I always thought about the passport. My wife has no connection with Ireland but loves the place and used to visit in the past. I am now able to get one up one her. Life is suddenly better :boogie:
 
#5
.....Thanks - I had an Irish gran on my dad's side. I always thought about the passport. My wife has no connection with Ireland but loves the place and used to visit in the past. I am now able to get one up one her. Life is suddenly better :boogie:
You can get a application processed based on one of your grandparents being born on the Island of Ireland as I believe it notes?
 
#6
The process is long-winded, but straightforward - I submitted my FBR application in Nov last year. In March I had to register my grandparent's birth as the event wasn't in question but there was no official record. That was slightly bizarre, particularly as I have no memory of her as she died when I was a baby, but there you go. My certificate of registration arrived in May giving me dual citizenship from that date, and I applied for a passport last month. It's due to arrive around the end of August.

I agree with @redshift that anyone who can probably should if they want to keep options like living elsewhere in Europe open, for a while at least. I'd add the proviso that anyone who is still serving or is DV, especially if they're in one of the more interesting lines of classified work, should take advice on the implications of dual citizenship before applying.
As someone who’s entitled to an Irish passport and passed it by, I have to question the loyalty of any serving soldier who goes down that route.

You cannot serve two masters.

The sooner the U.K. makes choosing single nationality compulsory the better.
 
#7
You can get a application processed based on one of your grandparents being born on the Island of Ireland as I believe it notes?
Yes, I will apply. My wife cannot. I am happy. I doubt it will ever be used but it will make her ".....green with envy. Just have to get a pikey transit then :)
 
#8
As someone who’s entitled to an Irish passport and passed it by, I have to question the loyalty of any serving soldier who goes down that route.

You cannot serve two masters.

The sooner the U.K. makes choosing single nationality compulsory the better.
Well it's a good thing Ireland is a neutral state in majority of conflicts to my knowledge at least
 
#10
Where do you look for evidence of a grandparents birth in Ireland? I'm considering applying for an Irish passport based on my Grandfathers Irish citizenship.

He passed away some twenty five years ago though and I have no paperwork. I know the area where he was born and I obviously have his name but that's pretty much it.

I was close to my grandparents and as a young child traveled to Ireland several times with them but so many years later, most of the details are lost to me.
 
#11
I have one, my kids have one as well. I served with the Army and do not consider myself conflicted at all.
 
#12
As someone who’s entitled to an Irish passport and passed it by, I have to question the loyalty of any serving soldier who goes down that route.

You cannot serve two masters.

The sooner the U.K. makes choosing single nationality compulsory the better.
I think it really depends on which two nations it is. My kids have dual nationality (British/Danish) and can't see where that would give rise to any conflict of interest
 
#14
Where do you look for evidence of a grandparents birth in Ireland? I'm considering applying for an Irish passport based on my Grandfathers Irish citizenship.

He passed away some twenty five years ago though and I have no paperwork. I know the area where he was born and I obviously have his name but that's pretty much it.

I was close to my grandparents and as a young child traveled to Ireland several times with them but so many years later, most of the details are lost to me.
See here

Contact information for Registrars of Births, Marriages and Deaths is available here, including addresses, opening hours, etc.

Further information is available from:

General Register Office
Government Offices
Convent Road
Roscommon
Ireland
Tel: +353 90 663 2900
Locall: 1890 25 20 76
Fax: +353 90 663 2999
Homepage: General Register Office
Email: gro@groireland.ie
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
For those flirting with the idea of becoming a bona fide bogman, here are a few Q & As from the citizenship test:

How do you get an Irishman to burn his ear?
Ring him when he's ironing.

How will the Irish expedition to the Sun avoid burning up?
They're going up at night.

What is the Irish solution to the water shoratge?
Dilute it.
 
#16
The sooner the U.K. makes choosing single nationality compulsory the better.
Why? This would be a backward move if anything. With globalization and increased movement of people between different countries, multiple-nationality is the way to go. Countries which previously allowed only single nationality have moved (or are considering) towards allowing their citizens to have more than one citizenship.

Of course, this may also mean you being out of contention for posts/ positions which involve handling of sensitive data needing SC.
 
#17
I just thought I'd make the denizens of ARRSE aware that acquiring an Irish passport whilst it may seem an arduous and long drawn out process it is actually straight forward.

Just sent off my application to have myself registered in the Irish Foreign Birth Register along with supporting docs including mothers original birth certificate and mine and other bits and if approved will recieve whats known as a "registration certificate"

"An application for Irish citizenship through Foreign Birth Registration (FBR) can be submitted by any person with a grandparent born in any part of Ireland or by any person whose parent received Irish citizenship prior to the birth of the applicant."

You'll get a registration certificate if approved, if any errors you'll have it returned back to you etc if any clarifications required or anything done incorrectly, that process is 278 euros

Sent mine off yesterday and got an "application recieved" e-mail, it does indicate they take ages to process.

There are ways of getting a certified copy of your grandparents birth certificate online.

After you get a copy of your registration certifcate, you can apply for an Irish passport having been classed as a citizen of Ireland.

You never know when having dual citizenship may come in useful
@chuggafugga alright, so how much commission is the Irish passport office paying you for referrals from this site? ;)
 
#18
Where do you look for evidence of a grandparents birth in Ireland? I'm considering applying for an Irish passport based on my Grandfathers Irish citizenship.

He passed away some twenty five years ago though and I have no paperwork. I know the area where he was born and I obviously have his name but that's pretty much it.

I was close to my grandparents and as a young child traveled to Ireland several times with them but so many years later, most of the details are lost to me.
See here

Contact information for Registrars of Births, Marriages and Deaths is available here, including addresses, opening hours, etc.

Further information is available from:

General Register Office
Government Offices
Convent Road
Roscommon
Ireland
Tel: +353 90 663 2900
Locall: 1890 25 20 76
Fax: +353 90 663 2999
Homepage: General Register Office
Email: gro@groireland.ie
@rgjbloke - if you know the date and place of birth you can just apply for a birth certificate through the GRO as @chuggafugga suggests. The specific page you want is here Birth certificate, death certificate, marriage certificate - order online - HSE.ie

Apart from the fact that many births weren't recorded in the late 19th Century, a lot of records were destroyed in a Dublin fire in 1922. The GRO may tell you they don't have a record of the birth, which is what happened to me, but they will refund the 20 Euro fee you pay for a certificate if this happens. You then have to go and find other evidence such as a baptism record - there are a lot online and you can track them down through one of the genealogy website - I used ancestry.co.uk. Once that's done you have to register the birth with GRO and can then apply for a birth certificate.
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
Why? This would be a backward move if anything. With globalization and increased movement of people between different countries, multiple-nationality is the way to go. Countries which previously allowed only single nationality have moved (or are considering) towards allowing their citizens to have more than one citizenship.

Of course, this may also mean you being out of contention for posts/ positions which involve handling of sensitive data needing SC.
Because citizenship should be something that comes with responsibilities and not just be an insurance policy in case your own country goes tits up - see all the "British" evacuees from Lebanon a few years ago, or a way of avoiding some difficult paperwork or having to go home.
 
#20
Because citizenship should be something that comes with responsibilities and not just be an insurance policy in case your own country goes tits up - see all the "British" evacuees from Lebanon a few years ago, or a way of avoiding some difficult paperwork or having to go home.
Define own country. What if you were born in the U.S., but grew up in the UK. What would be defined as own country? Or you spent your life equally in both these countries...?
 

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