Get your ID card from Tesco!

#1
HERE
The Telegraph said:
We'll be able to sign up for ID cards at Tesco
By Philip Johnston
Last Updated: 12:01am BST 12/05/2008

Almost unnoticed last week, the Government announced it had shaved another £1 billion off the cost of its proposed identity card scheme.

It did so by deciding to let the "open market" capture citizens' biometrics, effectively outsourcing the cost of enrolling people on to the ID database. You could end up getting your fingerprints taken at a supermarket, rather than at a passport office as originally proposed.

Almost imperceptibly, the security architecture originally built around the ID card project has been dismantled.

When it was proposed in 2002, the intention was to establish a bespoke database. David Blunkett, then Home Secretary, said: "We've got to build a clean identity database from scratch. We can't use the National Insurance numbers, as there are 20 million more National Insurance numbers than there are people in the country."

But this idea was abandoned. Instead, biometrics will be stored on an existing system in the Home Office used for asylum seekers, biographical information will be held on a National Insurance database in the Department for Work and Pensions and a third database at the Identity and Passport Service (IPS) will hold administrative details related to the issue and use of the ID cards.

It was also envisaged that everyone would have to give an iris print, which is the most secure biometric with a far lower chance of false readings than fingerprints. Last year, however, the Identity and Passport Agency said it would proceed only with fingerprints, which are far cheaper to capture.

Still, at least these fingerprints would be taken in the secure and official environs of a government passport office, one of 70 being set up for this purpose. But when it became clear that far more than 70 offices would be needed to enrol 60 million people on to a database, and it would be costly, this changed as well. Hence the announcement that private contractors will be asked to bid for the work.

Does any of this sound secure to you? It seems to defeat the purpose of the whole exercise, which is to protect identities, capture terrorists, bear down on benefit fraud and stop illegal immigration. But of course none of these will be ameliorated by the possession of an ID card, which nobody will be required to carry with them.

As one perplexed campaigner said after the publication of the new costings: "The Government now appears to have junked the primary pretext for the scheme. So what is it for?"

The answer has nothing to do with security, any more than the presence of CCTV cameras everywhere has anything to do with stopping crime, as even senior police officers now concede. It is about political control. The state wants to know where you are, and those who run it have always believed it has a right to know, but have usually been beaten back by Parliament.

Information technology has provided the wherewithal for these details to be captured, so the Government has seized its chance. The problem for us, though, is that it expects to be given the information without guaranteeing its security.

The only thing that would make this bargain remotely worthwhile is the certainty that our details will be secure, and a promise that we will not be mistaken for someone else. After all, it is the law-abiding citizen accused of being an illegal immigrant or an armed robber who stands to lose most.

So what is the ID scheme for? A few years ago the Treasury was developing the Citizen Information Project (CIP) - an attempt to "improve services by increasing the sharing of basic citizen information (contact details such as name, address and date of birth) across central and local government."

This envisaged establishing a population register, initially using the passport, DVLA and National Insurance databases to access and centralise personal information. The population database would be updated as births, deaths and changes of address were registered, and people came to live in the UK. The CIP was abandoned in 2003 when the ID scheme took over.

A valedictory report on the project said: "The National Identity Register proposed as part of the Home Office Identity Cards Programme will deliver many of the CIP benefits... by effectively acting as the UK adult population register."

Shorn of much of its security paraphernalia, that is what the ID scheme now is. It will fulfil an aim of British public policy since the 16th century. The Tudors wanted to set up a population register, and another failed attempt was made in 1753, when it was proposed to take an annual local count of population, and a record of all marriages, births and deaths. The idea was never pursued and Britain instead moved to a census as a way of counting the population.

But the population register concept was picked up in countries like Sweden, where everyone has a unique personal number (UPN) allocated at birth. For instance, 454010-1488 is a woman born on April 10, 1945 with the individual number 148 (an even number denotes a woman) and an anti-fraud check digit 8. All administrative records relating to this person carry the UPN from birth until death.

Politically, it seems peculiar that the Government did not define this whole exercise in the context of a population register from the start, rather than as the imposition of an identity card with all the attendant civil liberties connotations.

It would have sounded less sinister than an ID database and would have been far cheaper. A feasibility study for the CIP estimated it would cost £13 million to develop a register, £240 million to implement it and £25 million a year to run.

Given the gradual removal of the security walls around the proposed ID database, it is clear that this scheme has nothing to do with protecting our identities. It is about setting up a glorified population register to keep track of us.

Those who think the Government will scrap the ID cards are mistaken, since its main purpose is to establish a population database. This is also why it will eventually be compulsory to join in. You should start working out your UPN now.
 
#2
Oh, God, no!
 
#4
Is this why Tesco just launched a new/replacement loyalty card scheme. Pretty soon I wont need to shop - they will just send me what I want even if i dont know what i want and then take the money by DD.

Never mind an election - lets emigrate

RC
 
#5
The power of the TEsco Clibcard should not be underestimated as is probably better run, more secure and just better all round the any government database

It does make sense to have a single database though
 
#6
bar code tattoos for all, and identichip implants like pets get....

tinfoil hat, check. Coat, check.... TAXI! (take me to the airport.)
 
#7
theoriginalphantom said:
bar code tattoos for all, and identichip implants like pets get....

tinfoil hat, check. Coat, check.... TAXI! (take me to the airport.)

“He causes all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hand or on their foreheads, and that no one may buy or sell except one who has the mark or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.” Revelation 13:16,17
 

elovabloke

ADC
Moderator
#8
meridian said:
The power of the TEsco Clibcard should not be underestimated as is probably better run, more secure and just better all round the any government database

It does make sense to have a single database though
Not sure about the secure bit however if you have a card of any description big brother has nearly all the info it needs on you.
 
#9
theoriginalphantom said:
bar code tattoos for all, and identichip implants like pets get....

tinfoil hat, check. Coat, check.... TAXI! (take me to the airport.)
THX1138, independent thought will not be tolerated now take your soma!
 
#10
using fingerprints is not secure. All it means is that the criminal will cut your hand/fingers off to 'steal' your identity. This has already happened with expensive cars and bank accounts.

Ski.
 
#11
More importantly, will I get extra clubcard points for it. I so need a ticket to Chessington Park :roll:
 
#12
My understanding of this ID card business has been lost amid the confusion of it all. Is it still proposed that it will be mandatory to have ID cards? If so, it looks like I'm going to prison then. I wonder what would happen if an individual would refuse to have an ID card, gets sentenced and completes his sentence, but again refuses to submit to the ID card tyranny. Theoretically, I suppose, it may be possible to get a life sentence if one continued refusing.
 
#13
I'm currently boycotting Tesco. Does this mean I won't be able to leave the country until I start shopping there again?

Sainsbury's are going to be extrtemely upset with me.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#14
Nice, I go into my local cafe, and before they'll serve me they need a copy of my DNA profile, DoB, fingerprints, social security number, bank credit status, address, criminal convictions and political affiliations . . . before they will put the teabag in.

Go for a job in McDonalds, they'll want it too.
 
#15
they can **** off
whats the point of one huge database just volumes of pointless data and a way to feck off law abding types
wil go to jail rather than get one
if issued against my will will break it and chuck it :twisted:
 
#16
hong_kong_fuey said:
My understanding of this ID card business has been lost amid the confusion of it all. Is it still proposed that it will be mandatory to have ID cards? If so, it looks like I'm going to prison then. I wonder what would happen if an individual would refuse to have an ID card, gets sentenced and completes his sentence, but again refuses to submit to the ID card tyranny. Theoretically, I suppose, it may be possible to get a life sentence if one continued refusing.
I too am inclined to refuse to get an ID card to the point of prison.

I think the government will have a very rude awakening when the public finally realise what this ID card scheme entails.

Ski.
 
#18
Are they still intending on making you buy one when you go to renew your passport? Or can you just stroll into tesco for a pint of milk and a spot of ID theft? Surely its 10 times easier to steal an identity if you can just get a drivers license or some other easily falsely obtained/faked ID , wander in to a fucking supermarket (of all places), and get an all singing all dancing ID card? How can you trust a supermarket employee with , essentially, your life on a piece of plastic?


Im waiting till the last minute before getting a new passport, hopefully in the years it takes to expire I can avoid these things altoghether.
 
#19
drain_sniffer said:
Does anyone remember a programme in the 70's called the Prisoner - "I am not a number, I am a free man"
I'm making an assumption here that all you people opposing the plan for National ID Cards, are non-serving, never have served, never will serve civvie tossers. I spent 22 very happy years in the mob as a number.

When my MoD Form 90 was taken off me (by some never served civvie tw@t) I felt naked. OK I see where part of this leftie worry about big brother comes from, but as has already been said in this thread, if you've already got a card of any sort, they already have all that info.

Rant over.

MTB
 
D

Deleted 20555

Guest
#20
Mitchthebar said:
drain_sniffer said:
Does anyone remember a programme in the 70's called the Prisoner - "I am not a number, I am a free man"
I'm making an assumption here that all you people opposing the plan for National ID Cards, are non-serving, never have served, never will serve civvie tossers. I spent 22 very happy years in the mob as a number.

When my MoD Form 90 was taken off me (by some never served civvie tw@t) I felt naked. OK I see where part of this leftie worry about big brother comes from, but as has already been said in this thread, if you've already got a card of any sort, they already have all that info.

Rant over.

MTB
The problem is that the people collecting the information, storing the information, using the information and distributing the information are for a better word - cnuts - this they have proved a few months ago when they "lost" half the Uk's data and STILL haven't found it.

Thats why I and probably a lot of other people think it's a bad idea.
 
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