Germany to get equivilent of UKIP

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#1
Here's an interesting one from the Telegraph. It would appear a significant part of the German public is becoming exasperated that there is no alternative to the pro-euro parties. They are also worried that changes are being made without reference to the wishes of the German public. Accordingly, the Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) party is to be launched.

Germany's anti-euro party is a nasty shock for Angela Merkel - Telegraph

Political revolt against the euro construct has spread to Germany.

A new party led by economists, jurists, and Christian Democrat rebels will kick off this week, calling for the break-up of monetary union before it can do any more damage.

"An end to this euro," is the first line on the webpage of Alternative für Deutschland (AfD). "The introduction of the euro has proved to be a fatal mistake, that threatens the welfare of us all. The old parties are used up. They stubbornly refuse to admit their mistakes."

They propose German withdrawal from EMU and return to the D-Mark, or a breakaway currency with the Dutch, Austrians, Finns, and like-minded nations. The French are not among them. The borders run along the ancient line of cleavage dividing Latins from Germanic tribes.
Under the German PR system, AfD only need 5% of the votes to get representation in the German parliament, so they could tap into a deep sense of unease in a significant part of the the German electorate.

What I'm seeing is a slow stirring of anti-EU/anti-euro forces. Between the increasing support for UKIP in the UK, the Five Star Movement in Italy (anti-euro and with 25% of the vote), The True Finn Party in Finland, etc; parties opposed to the EU/euro seem to be slowly growing in prominence.

Wordsmith
 
#2
has anyone checked to ensure that no postcard painting, army cpl's are involved?
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
There's also an article in the German newspaper Der Spiegel.

German Election - SPIEGEL ONLINE - Nachrichten

Anti-euro political parties in Europe in recent years have so far tended to be either well to the right of center or, as evidenced by the recent vote in Italy, anything but staid. But in Germany, change may be afoot. A new party is forming this spring, intent on abandoning European efforts to prop up the common currency. And its founders are a collection of some of the country's top economists and academics.

Named Alternative für Deutschland (Alternative for Germany), the group has a clear goal: "the dissolution of the euro in favor of national currencies or smaller currency unions." The party also demands an end to aid payments and the dismantling of the European Stability Mechanism bailout fund.

"Democracy is eroding," reads a statement on its website (German only). "The will of the people regarding (decisions relating to the euro) is never queried and is not represented in parliament. The government is depriving voters of a voice through disinformation, is pressuring constitutional organs, like parliament and the Constitutional Court, and is making far-reaching decisions in committees that have no democratic legitimacy."
Life just got more interesting for German politics...

Wordsmith
 
#5
The 4th Reich's Neues Europa wasn't exactly a stellar outcome for ze Germans, and neither is it's 5th iteration.
 
#6
It is probably just a scam cooked up/paid for by the EU politicians so they can justify getting funding for extra campaining along the lines of 'keeping EU solidarity.'

But if not then yes...people have become dissafected. "What is the point?" Being probably the main question many ask themselves.

I think the EU should start again, educate people a little about the 'point' of the EU and how it works then set a realistic long-lasting manifesto about the future of the damned thing. Oh...and then stick to the manifesto.
 
#7
Tell a German to stand on one leg for 2 hours, and 95% of them would do so without questioning why. I ve been here 24 yrs now.

In that period, I ve witnessed the Great British Bulldogs turned into Chiwauwas by that little ****ing Chocolate manufacturing town.

Its time to send the UK and German Armies there and finally put a stop to this Dantes Inferno.

As a general rule, I tend to look after my family first, and if, a big if, theres anything left over, I might donate this to charity.

See how it works Brussels, its not Rocket-science you fuckin bunch of Crettin-breeders.


(Sorry for swearing, this is my biggest Red-Rag)
 
#8
Good for Germany, This should be interesting.

Belgium needs to be put in it's place and those workshy 'latin' states need a good shoeing.

Only this time, can the UK please side up with the German's ;-)
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#11
WW2 wouldnt have happened if those liberal politicians hadnt sided with the perfidious frogs, Entente my arse, we should have invaded and linked up in Paris!
Now keeping the Russians and Hermans apart may have been more difficult but spats between cousins often are!
If only the Foreign Office had approached Kaiser Bill and said steer clear of Belgium and France is all yours, just leave us the riviera and casinos!
 
#12
Germany is the nation which benefitted the most thanks to the Euro, it was always "their" currency. With the combination of keeping their wages low and sharing the same currency than the rest of he EU they had a competitive edge. It worked in their favour and they were milking it.

I find it amusing how they are now throwing a strop when it comes to taking responsibility to saving it. They caused the imbalance in the first place.

I agree with the AfD though, having read their goals, splitting up the currency in different blocks would probably be wise.

PS, they are NOT the equivalent of UKIP.
 
#13
Perfect timing! Just as we have announced the withdrawal from Germany.
As a kid in the 1960s I met an old guy who had served in Germany in the post WW1 occupation forces. I remember being astounded to discover that it was less than a decade after the British army pulled out that we were back at war again.

These days, reading accounts of WW2 you quite often come across mention of servicemen who spoke passable German. I assume that these were the guys who had been serving there.

History changes quite a lot in a decade.
 
#15
.
Isn't this how WW2 started?
You need to check for the ingredients. A Naziphile US ambassador to UK. A British General to invent the strategy for Germany to quickly overrun France. And an understanding UK would keep her empire and keep outa Europe.

Lessons to learn include avoiding the appointment of an interfering Archbishop of Canterbury. That old Cosmo back in the 30s thought "Holy!! Roman Empires better shaft the King"

The irony of this includes the King had visited South Wales. Appalled at the poverty he had brought pressure to create the Special Areas Reconstruction Act 1936. Essentially elements of govt thought great, move strategic industry from England beyond the range of German bombers just in case. (we are fortunate no longer to have this problem because the dribbling apprentice King we have is only concerned with slagging off architects and brewing piss poor organic beer)

So in the 30s skilled English engineers were laid off and their factories moved to Wales to gift jobs to Welsh (who couldn't actually do them)

Strangely an exact precedent for the torpedo factory relocated to Wales in 1976 to create work for Welsh and thereafter our torpedos stopped working. Another story of the Welsh work but their product doesn't.

During the war one brave soul mentioned to Churchill that unreliable components made in the 1936 grant aided industry in wales was actually downing more RAF aircraft than the Luftwaffe. Churchill exploded "That f-cking ex King and his interference. A war was going to create work for Taffs and Jocks why go giving them manufacturing work"

Lessons: Give Wales and Scotland independence. Then use Jocks and Taffs in the Army under Ghurka terms so we can shaft them on pensions and health care later on.

Be Germany's friend.

Restore dad's Army to guard our end of the Channel Tunnel.

Ask Germany nicely if, when they run Europe, they will keep electricity generated in France being supplied to UK as we have a huge energy demand to supply a population swollen by an immigrant problem.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
PS, they are NOT the equivalent of UKIP.
True enough.

UKIP grew as a small protest movement when anti-EU sentiment in the UK was less pronounced than it is now. It was (and probably is) still run by a slightly cranky set of political zealots. Over the last decade or two UKIP has stayed in roughly the same political position - it appears the UK electorate has moved towards UKIP's philosophy.

AfD seems to be filling a political void in Germany with the party being set up by a series of well respected academics. It starts off from a more serious perspective than UKIP. It also has a lower hurdle to overcome to get into parliament - I believe it only needs 5% of the vote to get seats under Germany's PR system. UKIP needs about 40% to win a seat under the first past the post system in the UK.

So I think AfD has a better chance than UK of getting a reasonable number of seat in the coming elections. If they hold the balance of power (and only a dozen seats could do that) German politics could get very interesting.

That said, I think UKIP is going to give a bloody nose to the established UK parties in the European elections next year. Its the chance to make a protest vote without letting an undesirable party get into power in the UK. I (a lifelong conservative supporter) will certainly be voting UKIP for that very reason.

Wordsmith
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
has anyone checked to ensure that no postcard painting, army cpl's are involved?
Never a truer word spoken in jest.

Over half of Austrians think the Nazis would be elected if the party was readmitted to politics - Europe - World - The Independent

As Austria prepares to mark the anniversary of its annexation by Nazi Germany, an opinion poll has shown that more than half of the population think it highly likely that the Nazis would be elected if they were readmitted as a party. A further 42 per cent agreed with the view that life “wasn’t all bad under the Nazis”, and 39 per cent said they thought a recurrence of anti-Semitic persecution was likely in Austria.

The disturbing findings were contained in a poll conducted for the Vienna newspaper, “Der Standard” in advance of Tuesday’s 75th anniversary of Austria’s Nazi annexation - a date which still counts as one of the most shameful and controversial in the country’s history.
Oops...

Wordsmith
 
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