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German WW2 tank ,pressure release bolts?

On a recent visit to the German tank Museum Munster i saw on the Sturm Tiger and several other large German WW2 tanks and assault guns these strange bolts.. They are in pairs and moveable and seem to me to be a sort of pressure release valve when the main armament is fired whilst closed down.
But to my annoyance i just don't know.
I visit the Museum at least once a year and have always been puzzled by these ''bolts''.

I can only appeal to the vast knowledge and wisdom for which the Arrserati are famed for,thanks .

detailbilder-sturmpanzer-vi-sturmtiger-walkaround-135-bild-0093.jpg
 
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There is a book covering the Elefant, Jagdtiger, and Sturmtiger variants of the Tiger tank family. It is available online as a SCRIBD in pdf form.


pp 31 to 51 cover the Sturmtiger.
As to your query, at least for the Sturmtiger, according to p44 of the document, the bolts you've shown were for ease of removal of the superstructure for repairs, or for two piece transport if the available roads would not take its weight.

The launcher's recoil was dealt with in an ingenious fashion:



This mechanism however, meant when the launcher fired, there was a most noticeable flash and a very loud report, meaning it had to be moved immediately after firing.

My apologies for the small print, and for not spotting the bit about the bolts sooner.
 
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Thanks very much for the Information i have just ordered the book for myself for Christmas.
Great to see once again that on ARRSE if you have a question no matter how diverse somebody knows the answer.:)
 
Would those be tow points or lift points? If you need to remove the engine from a car, for example, then after you've removed the car's bonnet you position your lifting gear, hook onto a lug atop the engine, take up enough slack that you can remove the engine mounting bolts safely, then lift the engine clear. The Tiger I hull already had tow points.

I imagine something similar is being done here on a much larger scale. By the looks of things, if one needed to get at the launcher for whatever reason, one would have to first remove the casemate. Therefore I would suggest the lift points were welded on when the casemate was produced.
 
Would those be tow points or lift points? If you need to remove the engine from a car, for example, then after you've removed the car's bonnet you position your lifting gear, hook onto a lug atop the engine, take up enough slack that you can remove the engine mounting bolts safely, then lift the engine clear. The Tiger I hull already had tow points.

I imagine something similar is being done here on a much larger scale. By the looks of things, if one needed to get at the launcher for whatever reason, one would have to first remove the casemate. Therefore I would suggest the lift points were welded on when the casemate was produced.
Okay fair enough, thanks for pointing me in the right direction.
18157739_1366455720097429_7227564712615042040_n.jpg
 
Would those be tow points or lift points? If you need to remove the engine from a car, for example, then after you've removed the car's bonnet you position your lifting gear, hook onto a lug atop the engine, take up enough slack that you can remove the engine mounting bolts safely, then lift the engine clear. The Tiger I hull already had tow points.

I imagine something similar is being done here on a much larger scale. By the looks of things, if one needed to get at the launcher for whatever reason, one would have to first remove the casemate. Therefore I would suggest the lift points were welded on when the casemate was produced.
I've got the book am very fluent in German and still don't understand,they seem to be for a Kind of internal stowage,but it doesn't make sense. :oops:
 

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