German war memorials

#1
Saw this on another forum and thought it may interest some on here. It’s an article showing various memorials around Germany mainly commemorating WW1 but you can see the difference between the Weimar and Nazi period. Some are rather artsy but in the main it’s Teutonic all the way. I don’t know if I should be outraged at the pineapples or not.

The Woe of the Vanquished
 
#4
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#5
I'd not disagree at all, but take your Langemarck and raise you Vladslo, with its Kathe Kollwitz sculptures.
I've never been there - what's the rough location? Langemark just struck me as a very cold, miserable place compared to the Commonwealth cemeteries in the same area. The mass grave in the middle was particularly striking, as was not being able to find a gravestone with fewer than 8 names on.

I'm quite looking forward to going back to the Ypres area next year and seeing things again with a better understanding of the history behind them.
 
#8
I've never been there - what's the rough location? Langemark just struck me as a very cold, miserable place compared to the Commonwealth cemeteries in the same area. The mass grave in the middle was particularly striking, as was not being able to find a gravestone with fewer than 8 names on.

I'm quite looking forward to going back to the Ypres area next year and seeing things again with a better understanding of the history behind them.
About 5km NE of Diksmuide, on the northern end of the Salient. The sight line from the father's eyes goes to the grave of the sculptor's son, who died in 1914.
 
#9
Saw this on another forum and thought it may interest some on here. It’s an article showing various memorials around Germany mainly commemorating WW1 but you can see the difference between the Weimar and Nazi period. Some are rather artsy but in the main it’s Teutonic all the way. I don’t know if I should be outraged at the pineapples or not.

The Woe of the Vanquished
No you shouldn't. It is kind of complicated in Germany because those poor sods served two criminal governments in two world wars. These feats are mostly done by poor dumb buggers which do not realise that a little more than 100 years ago other poor dumb buggers were murdered by their own government. They even do not realize that those people were of the same age, had the same dreams and the same fears or that millions had to die for the freedoms they enjoy today. Hopefully they won't have to die for criminals and can enjoy their freedom and their civic rights.
On the other side, if i ever catch one defacing a memorial i will give him a proper shoeing.
 
#10
Interesting they have survived, I heard that the Control Commission in the British Zone of Occupation would destroy war memorials to include 1870- 71 war with France as part of de-militarization. Also this applied to former Soviet Zone and GDR. Even now Greens and far left groups would have them destroyed?
 
#11
Interesting they have survived, I heard that the Control Commission in the British Zone of Occupation would destroy war memorials to include 1870- 71 war with France as part of de-militarization. Also this applied to former Soviet Zone and GDR. Even now Greens and far left groups would have them destroyed?
Goes back even earlier. The Battle of Leuthen was in 1757, and involved 'Germanic' Prussians giving a good pasting to 'Germanic' Austrians, Bavarians and Wurttemburgers in what had been Austrian Silesia, but by then was Prussian Silesia and has become, post-1945, Polish Silesia.



'Leuthen is now Lutynia - about 10km west of the beautiful city of Wroclaw (the former Breslau). The memorial that was erected in the mid 19th century - a 20-metre victory column made from grey granite, topped with an angel - was dynamited after World War Two, when the province of Silesia fell to Poland and national antagonisms were still (understandably) running high. The remains of that monument are still there - a graffiti-covered granite pediment, standing alone in a farmer's field; the message of the German inscription long since forgotten.'

historian at large: The forgotten battlefield at Leuthen...
 
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skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
#12
If anyone is ever visiting the area around Tyne Cot then Langemark cemetery is well worth a visit. I don't think I've been to a more depressing place.

Langemark German Military Cemetery, Ypres Salient, Belgium

We visited on the hottest day of the year 2017 it was a cold, dark, depressing place.
It wasn't even on my list but the tour person insisted.
Good call in a strange sort of way. And then we got to see photos of Adolf at the Menin Gate, somehow that was even more disturbing.
 
#13
Interesting they have survived, I heard that the Control Commission in the British Zone of Occupation would destroy war memorials to include 1870- 71 war with France as part of de-militarization. Also this applied to former Soviet Zone and GDR. Even now Greens and far left groups would have them destroyed?
I went to Laboe naval memorial earlier in the year and apparently we closed it after the war in case it became a shrine to Nazis. When it was reopened it was rededicated to all sailors.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#15
The German cemetery at Arnhem seemed cold but I was impressed when on the approach to Albert a couple of years ago Clayp1g and I found a German Cemetery which was possibly as far as they had advanced in 1918. Lots of doubled up graves (seems common) but compare this to the French Cemetery on the Menin road just outside Ypres and the mass grave there doesn't seem so grim.
I spend a couple of days in Visbeck every few years visiting my Grandfathers grave. The hotel is next to the church and the names of locals are on a memorial with panels for each war. Looking, as you do, when driving around and every little farming hamlet has a decent sized memorial stone. Some even have my family name on there!
 
#16
From my limited experience of visiting German war cemeteries, they always seemed somber and almost apologetic in the way they remembered the dead. They say the Victor always rights the history, but it is sad that those who fought and died "as common soldiers" are treated so differently because they fought for the wrong side. I don't know if that is down to the "host nation, or the German war graves commission (if they have such a thing). I have no idea if during the occupation 39 to 45 the Germans desecrated the CWG's, or they respected them as a memorial to brave soldiers. Perhaps someone will enlighten me further on this last part.
 
#17




A German burial in Templemore C of I churchyard Tipperary. The barracks nearby was used as a POW camp early in WW1. Poor Spellerberg ate a dodgy sausage and died of food poisoning. While his headstone remains here, his body was relocated to the German War Cemetery at Glencree, Co. Wicklow (below) where all the Germans of two world wars are now buried.

 
#19
I visited on whilst on a staff ride. This was a WWI site, and interestingly, the Jewish graves often had little white stones balanced on the top. Don't know why.
The Jewish graves in CWGC cemeteries do too. Whenever I pass a Jewish grave I put a stone on it as well.
 
#20
The German cemetery at Arnhem seemed cold but I was impressed when on the approach to Albert a couple of years ago Clayp1g and I found a German Cemetery which was possibly as far as they had advanced in 1918. Lots of doubled up graves (seems common) but compare this to the French Cemetery on the Menin road just outside Ypres and the mass grave there doesn't seem so grim.
I spend a couple of days in Visbeck every few years visiting my Grandfathers grave. The hotel is next to the church and the names of locals are on a memorial with panels for each war. Looking, as you do, when driving around and every little farming hamlet has a decent sized memorial stone. Some even have my family name on there!
The German policy of double or mass graves is intentional and cultural to show comradeship in death, a German theme. With the stone markers and fir trees you can almost hear Wagner in the atmosphere.
 

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