German Wündertanks vs Shermans

WRT the T-34's drivewheel, I go over the BT-7's wheel and road-running here. By the BT-7, the chains had been replaced by a permanent shrouded system.
Should be timestamped to about 4:30.
 
The American way... standing in the open surrounded by 3/4 ply to chest level... and the chauffeur standing up in the open with no cover.

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And the British way, sitting under and surrounded on all side and top by armour proof against 7.92 ball. There is even a roll forward canvas tilt. Your driver and bow gunner had armoured cockpits to sit down in.


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LCVP had side armor panels of 1/4" STS steel on the hull sides from 1942 on and the ramp was entirely steel. STS was BuShips standard armor plating

Gunners (2 x .30) had shields on its Mark 21 mounts of 1/4 STS also used for the LVT(A)-2
 
The Japanese were ahead of the world on amphibious operations, didn't the americans garner most of there ideas from them.
Japanese Pre war Amphib ops were usually landing by Whaleboat on the Bund of ships landing party. SNLF which pre war were only Battalion sized made small landings along rivers more akin to traditional cutting out parties than WW2 style ops
 
Pintle mounted Guns, some armour for the coxswain to stand behind, all came later after costly experience in the Pacifuc.
Funny, Images from the Guadalcanal landings show Pintile and schraff mounted guns on LCP(L) and LCP(R)'s

In fact Douglas Munro USCG won the MoH (Posthumously)manning a lewis gun while landing Marines on 27 September 1942 so the guns were there from the First US Amphib operations. Armor did come later


MUNRO, DOUGLAS ALBERT
Rank: Signalman First Class
Organization: U.S. Coast Guard
Company:
Division:
Born: 11 October 1919, Vancouver, British Columbia
Departed: Yes
Entered Service At:
G.O. Number:
Date of Issue:
Accredited To: Washington
Place / Date:





Citation

For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry m action above and beyond the call of duty as Petty Officer in Charge of a group of 24 Higgins boats, engaged in the evacuation of a battalion of marines trapped by enemy Japanese forces at Point Cruz Guadalcanal, on 27 September 1942. After making preliminary plans for the evacuation of nearly 500 beleaguered marines, Munro, under constant strafing by enemy machineguns on the island, and at great risk of his life, daringly led 5 of his small craft toward the shore.

As he closed the beach, he signaled the others to land, and then in order to draw the enemy's fire and protect the heavily loaded boats, he valiantly placed his craft with its 2 small guns as a shield between the beachhead and the Japanese. When the perilous task of evacuation was nearly completed, Munro was instantly killed by enemy fire, but his crew, 2 of whom were wounded, carried on until the last boat had loaded and cleared the beach. By his outstanding leadership, expert planning, and dauntless devotion to duty, he and his courageous comrades undoubtedly saved the lives of many who otherwise would have perished. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
 
Japanese Pre war Amphib ops were usually landing by Whaleboat on the Bund of ships landing party. SNLF which pre war were only Battalion sized made small landings along rivers more akin to traditional cutting out parties than WW2 style ops
Mike Calvert wrote of seeing bespoke Japanese landing craft in China in the 30s, in his opinion far in advance of anything the British had at that time.
 
They were made in six main plants, but in the field, any part from any Sherman could be swapped, spares were just spares, they fitted first time out of the wrapper any Sherman from any plant.
Had an older Sherman and fancied one of the new fangled all round vision port TC hatches? Find a dead newer Sherman or order one from the QM, half an hours work with a socket set and your golden.
Not quite, the M4A4(Sherman V) had a slightly longer hull (and track run) due to the powerplant. You could not fit a Chrysler A57 engine in any of the rest of the Series M4
 
Mike Calvert wrote of seeing bespoke Japanese landing craft in China in the 30s, in his opinion far in advance of anything the British had at that time.
First Jap Landing craft with a bow ramp came into service in 1937 designed to allow light Artillery to be landed
 
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Japanese Pre war Amphib ops were usually landing by Whaleboat on the Bund of ships landing party. SNLF which pre war were only Battalion sized made small landings along rivers more akin to traditional cutting out parties than WW2 style ops
A bit more than that; at Kota Bharu they had a large landing craft with smaller landing craft with ramps.
 
First Jap Landing craft with a bow ramp came into service in 1937 designed to allow light Artillery to be landed
I know a lot of people pick on the Japanese armaments, especially tanks, as being really bad. However, I feel this is largely unfair. The Japanese high command were dangerously incompetent, but some of the lower regimental and battalion commanders were pretty advanced.
For example, pre-war (just!) one Japanese regiment got some Type 38 75mm guns and motorised them by strapping them to the back of a truck, and decided to use them as Self-propelled anti-tank guns. Something that a lot of other nations wouldn't do for a couple of years.

Granted the attempt met with failure mainly due to the sights and the mounts of the guns, and the fact it was only a soft-skin truck.
 
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I know a lot of people pick on the Japanese armaments, especially tanks, as being really bad. However, I feel this is largely unfair. The Japanese high command were dangerously incompetent, but some of the lower regimental and battalion commanders were pretty advanced.
For example, pre-war (just!) one Japanese regiment got some Type 38 75mm guns and motorised them by strapping them to the back of a truck, and decided to use them as Self-propelled anti-tank guns. Something that a lot of other nations wouldn't do for a couple of years.

Granted the attempt met with failure mainly due to the sights and the mounts of the guns, and the fact it was only a soft-skin truck.
There small arms were functional, in fact all there kit was functional and as said there amphibious operations were second to none, until the americans/british started churning out LSTs. The Zero was an astonishing aircraft, given they did not have a significant aircraft industry.

In a perverse way, our future defence could do a lot more and look at how services without all the Gucci kit, refocus on training warriors.
 
I noticed that the 2 layers are facing the guns breach with their backs to the target
the gunlayer on the 88 and the Russian 85 faced towards the barrel, watching the traverse scale, so I guess it didn't matter where they faced as long as the needle pointed where it was supposed to.
 
I know a lot of people pick on the Japanese armaments, especially tanks, as being really bad. However, I feel this is largely unfair. The Japanese high command were dangerously incompetent, but some of the lower regimental and battalion commanders were pretty advanced.
For example, pre-war (just!) one Japanese regiment got some Type 38 75mm guns and motorised them by strapping them to the back of a truck, and decided to use them as Self-propelled anti-tank guns. Something that a lot of other nations wouldn't do for a couple of years.

Granted the attempt met with failure mainly due to the sights and the mounts of the guns, and the fact it was only a soft-skin truck.
There were truck mounted AA guns in service with pretty much everyone on the Western Front by 1918, it wasn't a new concept. The British had a fully armoured, tracked SP 18Pdr in 1925.
 
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There small arms were functional, in fact all there kit was functional and as said there amphibious operations were second to none, until the americans/british started churning out LSTs. The Zero was an astonishing aircraft, given they did not have a significant aircraft industry.

In a perverse way, our future defence could do a lot more and look at how services without all the Gucci kit, refocus on training warriors.
I vote for not adopting the Japanese WWII ethos thanks. Given that it ended up with their home islands a smoking glow in the dark ruin and all.
 
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I vote for not adopting the Japanese WWII ethos thanks. Given that it ended up with their home islands a smoking glow in the dark ruin and all.
Aye, you got me there. It was more a wider point, not for this thread.
 
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It was a jury rigged assault boat unlike the purpose designed British LCA that was subjected to exhaustive user trials including ballistic tests. The ramps avd protection came later on the Higgins boats after a redesign. The LCA always had them and was always a far better assault boat.... ask the US Rangers.
Those are the early product, not the one they made tens of thousands of.
 
I know a lot of people pick on the Japanese armaments, especially tanks, as being really bad. However, I feel this is largely unfair. The Japanese high command were dangerously incompetent, but some of the lower regimental and battalion commanders were pretty advanced.
For example, pre-war (just!) one Japanese regiment got some Type 38 75mm guns and motorised them by strapping them to the back of a truck, and decided to use them as Self-propelled anti-tank guns. Something that a lot of other nations wouldn't do for a couple of years.

Granted the attempt met with failure mainly due to the sights and the mounts of the guns, and the fact it was only a soft-skin truck.
Like we did with the portee & two & six pounders.
 
Not quite, the M4A4(Sherman V) had a slightly longer hull (and track run) due to the powerplant. You could not fit a Chrysler A57 engine in any of the rest of the Series M4

Nor could you fit a Ford GAA in one with a Wright 975.... which Is a completely different issue to not being able to swap two apparently identical final drive gears between two apparently identical Panthers.

One if the QA tests the ordnance board did regularly was to take a batch of a sub assembly on a Sherman made at different plants mix all the parts up and rebuild them with the now randomised parts....they always fitted.

And that’s the reason why German gear had such a short post war life with people who tried to use the ‘superior’ wunderwaffen, everything was a maintenance nightmare and even ‘new’ spares were machine and hand fit.
 
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