German translation

Discussion in 'Juniors' started by hotshot85, Aug 21, 2008.

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  1. I need to find out what schmeckling means or I'll be showparaded on my long weekend. Any help would be great. Any other german words that I can use to get one over on my Cpl would be appreciated too.
     
  2. Well, that's an easy one, mucker. It doesn't mean anything! It's not a word! At a pinch, it could be interpreted as the word "Schmetterling" (butterfly), when used by kiddies still learning the language.

    Hope this helps.

    MsG
     
  3. Not sure about "schmeckling." "Schmetterling" is a butterfly.
     
  4. Okay - I've been speaking German for years.

    I reckon Butterfly however you're saying it wrong.

    :D
     
  5. Cheers guys and girls, anyone heard of it as a slang word in german, as close as it is to butterfly I'd guess my Cpl is looking for an altogether dirter answer.Cheers for the help so far.
     
  6. not wrong Jib :D ...don't speak German...however the translator on google came up with "schmeckle" as being to do with taste......??? :?
     
  7. Oh, other words you can use on your full-screw: Arschgeige, Pißqualle, Schafsäckel, Dumpftrottel, Lümmeltütenschlecker, Rotzschlürfer, Pfeifenkauer, Schlapparsch, Pfeife, Schlappschwanz, Dözigdummer, Flachwichser, Rosettenlecker, um nur einige zu nennen (just to name a few).

    Lab dich dran/Bedien dich (fill yer boots).

    MsG
     
  8. hotshot...look at my earlier post and follow the link....I guess it might be what you are looking for......(oh...that may not be what I mean to say.....!!!)
     
  9. Also "Smart arrse" seems fitting!
     
  10. Also not wrong. "Schmeckle" is a specifically Swabian word for a very special treat. Otherwise called "Leckerbissen" in typical German.

    MsG
     
  11. :D ...I suspect we may be getting closer....... (oh, I'm going to hell for even being able to think of derivatives........ :twisted: )
     
  12. Just to complicate matters a little further, "Schmecken" in Swiss-German means "to smell", replacing the normal German word of "riechen".

    MsG
     
  13. A Smelly treat ? :)
     
  14. A smelly treat indeed. Thanks all for your help with that. A weekend of boozing followed by a week of starvation on PAYD awaits!!