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German President invited to Cenotaph.

Will Jean Claude Juncker be wearing his Dad's old (Eastern Front) uniform?
Clue- Not the Luxembourg resistance one..........................................................................
The official line is that In 1941 over 10,000 Luxembourgers were forced to serve in the German army, and his Daddy was one of them.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Not only has it been written about, it was written about in the 1970s by an American....

Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory. Still up there with Gerard J deGroot's Blighty: British Society in the Era of the Great War as the only two books to read on WW1 if you only read 2 books on WW1. Dealing with Britain anyway.
Fussel is available on kindle, pricy though, I may have to get a proper job before buying both!
 
Fussel is available on kindle, pricy though, I may have to get a proper job before buying both!
both highly recommended and have bubbled around the university readings lists right from publication 40 years ago.

Also a handy corrective to the idea that either revisionist history is something new, or that everyone from the thirties onwards has viewed WW1 as, frankly, mud blood and dreadful poetry.
 
Was that posted as a laugh, that's a genuine question.

I can't see too many leaders wanting to be reminded of that carriage and it's part in allowing Hitler to demonstrate his power and revenge over France in WW2 :)
Does the railway carriage still exist?
 
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ugly

LE
Moderator
Does the railway carriage still exist?
Apparently Uncle Adolf had the French sign their surrender in it then blew it up!
 
Does the railway carriage still exist?

I've not Googled the (village) name, but I presume there will be an appropriate church in the vacinity?

I have certainly NOT heard anything about any other planning for such a ceremony, so the collective ARRSE will have to work fast!

@bigeye can organise the outside broadcast (OB) coverage.

I would nominate @Crash to use his contacts and diplomatic skills to ensure a suitable international representation. If he is happy to suspend his I.V. Drip from the Discovery's roof rails, I'll volunteer to drive.

Catering, and the production of post event nibbles and volovaunts, would be the responsibility of @Joker62.

If only we knew someone with connections to a military band ;) !!
Hitler had it blown to pieces to get revenge for the surrender.
There is a new version that was remade to go back to commemorating the WW1 armistice.
 
Not only has it been written about, it was written about in the 1970s by an American....

Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory. Still up there with Gerard J deGroot's Blighty: British Society in the Era of the Great War as the only two books to read on WW1 if you only read 2 books on WW1. Dealing with Britain anyway.
ISTR P. Fussell writing about battlefield medicine possibly WWI. The book is somewhere on my shelves though I haven't gone back to it for quite a few years. John Keegan (The First World War) I believe said The Great War and Modern Memory is an encapsulation of a collective European experience. AFAIK it's been criticised (Swift: "great literary criticism and lousy history") though not by many of much note or import. Even so, reading a mix of reliable sources, memoirs and primary sources (lots of memoirs out there for nowt) works for me.
 
AFAIK it's been criticised (Swift: "great literary criticism and lousy history") though not by many of much note or import. Even so, reading a mix of reliable sources, memoirs and primary sources (lots of memoirs out there for nowt) works for me.
Oh sure, read nothing in isolation. I've done a couple of degrees now with some of our greatest military historians (my postgrad work was supervised by one H Strachan), and they all still speak highly of it. Scholarship moves on, but aside from something littered with egregious errors/misapprehensions, good history will remain good history if you read it in context!
 
Oh sure, read nothing in isolation. I've done a couple of degrees now with some of our greatest military historians (my postgrad work was supervised by one H Strachan), and they all still speak highly of it. Scholarship moves on, but aside from something littered with egregious errors/misapprehensions, good history will remain good history if you read it in context!
Agreed (Robin Prior, *cough*) and I had a lot of help from Mr Fussell. Well done you, I really couldn't face any more history, scholarly writing or research. These days it's all wellies and gardens, but it's nice to think that people are reading your work.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
No, he wasn't, nor was he around in 1933.......you see what I'm getting at?
No I don't.
I thought the German president would be invited as the modern representative of a group, (in this particulat case a nation,) who engaged in conflict with the British Armed forces, and with whom we are now at peace.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Of course he could attend, although to be fair I'm not sure he'll get to be the prime minister of Great Britain in time, so is likely to still just be a nobody who has no right to be there as he wouldn't be representing a country.
I was unaware that those laying wreaths at Remembrance services all had to represent a country.

Why, do you think he has a chance of becoming PM in time?
I'll give you the benefit of that being a rhetorical/beer question, but what does it have to do with anything ?
 
I hope two things happen:

Our former colonies and dominions who contributed so much to victory in both wars are invited and send big contigents. I would like to see members of the armies of the Indian sub continent, Africa, Canada, Australia, NZ and anyone else I've forgotten marching in the parade.

HRH the Duke of Edinburgh reminding our German guest quite how determined3 the British are and how often we've fought to prevent a united Europe
Talking of inviting along former Colonies, can the Yanks come as well ? I seem to remember they contributed a fair whack to the final victory, albeit turning up a bit late.
Twice .
 
No I don't.
I thought the German president would be invited as the modern representative of a group, (in this particulat case a nation,) who engaged in conflict with the British Armed forces, and with whom we are now at peace.
OK, well Remembrance Sunday is supposed to be about Remembrance and reconciliation, not perpetrating hatred of peoples from other nations that we've fought against in wars that are almost outside living history or beyond.

Unless you want to exclude the American Ambassador because of the War of 1812? Or the French Ambassador because of the Whole Napoleonic thing? Or Zanzibar (38 minuets) in 1896?
 
The discussion seems to go round and round about where do you put the point in the time line of enemy to friend and friend to enemy which is particularly difficult as UK seem to have fought and befriended most nations on the globe at some point in history.

Rememberance an Concilliation is good.

(Caveated - UK, Britain, possibly just England.....it really becomes a whole Pandora's box doesn't it)
 
Danny Boyle to sort out our remembering? I cannot wait to see how Stormzy interprets the racial lessons learnt at the Somme.
It would be more dignified if his brother Frankie was in charge than that lefty twat.

Can we also ensure that her highness Lilly Allen is escorted by a troop of Gurkhas please. She will need protection as the Cenotaph will be full of white men just gagging to rape her ugly ass and grope her saggy tits. Us white men just cannot get enough of a a bit of Lilly rapin, cause we are all cvnts who just ruin society and the planet.
Swap Pacific Islanders for the Gurkha troop and it's a plan. (They are less fussy).
 
As this is ARRSE it's likely many of us will know this, or that the USA was good good friends with Japan in the inter war years, and that US troops trained with and did exercises with Japaneses troops in Japan.

I sometimes wonder if the change you mention from WW1 to WW2 isn't as well known by the wider public as they were never taught much (or anything) about Japan in the WW1 era.
While many younger people I've spoken to can cite the different ethos of Germany in WW1 versus WW2 many of them also think China was our enemy in WW2.
My Grandfather did a lot of trade with Japan in the before and after the 1st World War, not so much during as he was in the HLI's Glasgow Chamber of Commerce Battalion.
 

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