German Medal WW1



Someone enquiring on another site. The back has the inscription Omnia vincit labor improbus. Til Ottokar fra Zitla, Krigsåret 1914. The last bit looks to me to be an inscription done as a gift or something and could be Danish/Norwegian. Anyone any idea what it is?
 
Its German, with a copy of the Iron Cross in the middle and a First War one at that. The Germans loved making medals for all things, I think this is possibly a group/organisational award.
 


Someone enquiring on another site. The back has the inscription Omnia vincit labor improbus. Til Ottokar fra Zitla, Krigsåret 1914. The last bit looks to me to be an inscription done as a gift or something and could be Danish/Norwegian. Anyone any idea what it is?
Standard patriotic medal - non issue. There were also pin badges with the same mottos.
Omnia vincit labor improbus. - hard work conquers all
Til Ottokar fra Zitla, Krigsåret 1914 To Ottokar from Zitla, in the year of war 1914

Danish, it seems - note the Muessen, as opposed to German/Prussian “müssen
 

37ucv67i

War Hero
"To Ottokar from ZItla, War year 1914" in Norwegian. Ottokar is a very old-fashioned German first name and was so even in 1914. Its bearer would probably be from an upper middle-class family with an academic, literary or artistic background.
 
Can't find anything matching... wondering it it's commemerative medalion or coin rather than an official decoration..

The actual depiction in the middle is of an Iron Cross Second Class

Gott Mit Uns is a general German Army Motto..

On Official medals the lower Motto is normally rendered as "Wir Wollen and Mussen Siegen" :


"Omnia vincit labor improbus " or "Steady Work Overcomes All Things" is an adaption from Virgils Georgics... widely used as a motto by cities, schools, and labour organisations and in one version the Pioneer Corps...


"Til Ottokar fra Zitla, Krigsåret 1914 " detects as Norwegian but also works in Swedish and translates to "To Ottokar from Zitla, 1914 War Year"
 
As a perhaps partial explanation it's worth remembering that Sweden once held significant areas of, what was in 1914, the North German Baltic coastline. Although most of it became German around 1720, one area [Wismar] remained Swedish until 1820, That's only 4 generations to the start of WW1.
 
Its German, with a copy of the Iron Cross in the middle and a First War one at that. The Germans loved making medals for all things, I think this is possibly a group/organisational award.
Thanks for the Informative Gary Cooper but I rather think I got it wrong. Apparently its a Norwegian award, can't think why an Iron Cross is the central item as that's a Germanic symbol.
Hey Ho happy to be proved wrong
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
As a perhaps partial explanation it's worth remembering that Sweden once held significant areas of, what was in 1914, the North German Baltic coastline. Although most of it became German around 1720, one area [Wismar] remained Swedish until 1820, That's only 4 generations to the start of WW1.
At various points during the wasteful 30 years war the Swedes had everything from the French and polish borders to Prague and then some!
 
Thanks for the Informative Gary Cooper but I rather think I got it wrong. Apparently its a Norwegian award, can't think why an Iron Cross is the central item as that's a Germanic symbol.
Hey Ho happy to be proved wrong
Devil's Advocate here. Why would a Norwegian medal have a German inscription?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Thanks for the Informative Gary Cooper but I rather think I got it wrong. Apparently its a Norwegian award, can't think why an Iron Cross is the central item as that's a Germanic symbol.
Hey Ho happy to be proved wrong
Any more gen than that ?
 
At various points during the wasteful 30 years war the Swedes had everything from the French and polish borders to Prague and then some!
Agreed, but they lost it so fast that population movement was unlikely. The areas that were held long term make Scandinavian names in WW1 Germany more likely.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
"Til Ottokar fra Zitla, Krigsåret 1914 " detects as Norwegian but also works in Swedish and translates to "To Ottokar from Zitla, 1914 War Year"
After checking with an ex-Arrser, the official comment is, "Bollocks."
 
Apparently its a Norwegian award, can't think why an Iron Cross is the central item as that's a Germanic symbol.
My next question to whoever said this is 'What war was Norway fighting in 1914".
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

dlrg

LE
The medalion is an unofficial, probably German made, WW1 Patriotic souvenir. One of countless production types. Without seeing the reverse of the medal, I would guess it is 'plain' apart from the inscription.
The northernmost part of Germany at this time was the Province of Schleswig-Holstein (a partially Danish speaking region), which might account for the language. Schleswig was returned to Denmark after the war. Copies of this sort of badge/medal are still produced. Here's one from ebay.de



1570804751758.png
 
Last edited:

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
The medalion is an unofficial WW1 Patriotic souvenier. One of countless production types. Without seeing the reverse of the medal. I would guess it is 'plain' apart from the inscription.
The northernmost part of Germany at this time was the Province of Schleswig-Holstein (a Danish speaking region), which might account for the language. Schleswig was returned to Denmark after the war. Copies of this sort of badge/medal are still produced. Here's one from ebay.de



View attachment 422164
I'm reliably informed there were thousands of ethnic Danes conscripted by the Imperial German Army.
Maybe that's the reason for the inscription on the reverse not being in Swedish.
 

Latest Threads

Top