Builds German Infantry Battle for France 1/35th scale Diorama.

So here it is the kit has arrived and I'm taking a look in the box.
box artwork.jpg

lid off, lets see what we get. The box is almost chock full, apart from a space along the top. All the parts are sealed and protected in the bag within the box.
box lid off.jpg

here's a view of some PE parts and decals
pe and descals.jpg
 
the upper hull casting is packaged in it's own sealed poly bag, along with the turret upper casting.
hull casting a.jpg

the turret cast resting on two tins of Humbrol, just to give you an impression of size.
turret casting.jpg

the hull is small, smaller than the AFV club Scimitar.
hull casting b.jpg
 
despite it's tiny size, the kit has full interior and that includes the engine compartment, a shed load of parts in a small area, just what I fancy making right now.
instructions a.jpg

instructions b.jpg
 
There are some very interesting paint schemes to go with the R-35 if you want to try them as no less than 16 different colours were authorized by the armed forces.

The manufacturers had some daring examples that included the use of light blue or even mauve (mauve pâle in French) for elements of the turret...

I very strongly recommend the GBM Magazine for inspiration and field pictures.


The problem is that they sell out very quickly; some can be found on eBay.fr
 

4(T)

LE
despite it's tiny size, the kit has full interior and that includes the engine compartment, a shed load of parts in a small area, just what I fancy making right now.
View attachment 544570
View attachment 544571



Seems a shame to have a very interesting and detailed interior covered up.

Have you ever done something like this in "exploded" format - perhaps with the upper hull/turret suspended above the lower hull/interior?

I saw one tank where the modeller had sliced the tank in two lengthways, but about 1/3 of the way across - not down the centreline. This was far enough to take off the side of the turret and show most of the interior in place, but avoided the need to section (and thus scratch build the internals of) the engine and drive train.
 

Daz

LE
Guessing from the decal sheet it's the bottom one.

If you say that based on the "clubs" on the turret, this was a standardized marking at the time, denoting the platoon (not troop, these were infantry tanks) in each Coy. The colour then indicated the Coy in the Bn.

Most (not all) units used the following code:

spade: 1st Pn, heart: 2nd Pn, diamonds :3rd Pn and clubs: 4th Pn

Blue: 1st Coy, red 2nd, Green 3rd.

Blue clubs: 4th Pn of the 1st Coy
 
Seems a shame to have a very interesting and detailed interior covered up.

Have you ever done something like this in "exploded" format - perhaps with the upper hull/turret suspended above the lower hull/interior?

I saw one tank where the modeller had sliced the tank in two lengthways, but about 1/3 of the way across - not down the centreline. This was far enough to take off the side of the turret and show most of the interior in place, but avoided the need to section (and thus scratch build the internals of) the engine and drive train.
funny you should mention that, I have....
final stages of weathering.jpg

the first cut makes you question if you are doing the right thing, cutting open an expensive kit
 
I have this in the stash, the crew of a FT17, though these were used in WW2, unsure if the uniforms are ww1 or ww2. If I do use these, if they are WW2, The drivers two part hatch will be open so the interior is exposed.
crew figures.jpg
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
funny you should mention that, I have....
View attachment 544591
the first cut makes you question if you are doing the right thing, cutting open an expensive kit
If you think that was worrying. . .
Take two of these
1612024108680.jpeg

At about £250 each 30 years ago
And running a band saw through them to make 4 of these

1612024345697.jpeg

For the first time, I had to go sit down afterwards :eek:
 

Daz

LE
despite it's tiny size, the kit has full interior and that includes the engine compartment, a shed load of parts in a small area, just what I fancy making right now.
View attachment 544570
View attachment 544571

So you can model it in its typical state by June 1940; brewed up. And of course it's tiny, as it only accommodates a 2-man crew (and no radio).
 
So you can model it in its typical state by June 1940; brewed up. And of course it's tiny, as it only accommodates a 2-man crew (and no radio).

Actually, very few brewed up after being hit. The burnt tanks were generally set alight by their crews after a mechanical breakdown (75% of the French tanks losses in 1940). The fast Op tempo and lack of efficient recovery units led to 1000s of tanks and AFVs (an estimated 2,800) being scuttled after sometimes minor breakdowns.

The armor on French tanks of 1940 was far better than anything the Germans had and when tanks were destroyed it's generally after having been hit by an 88 or even a 105 mm round. The 37 mm PaK was useless in most cases and many 37 mm PaK gun crews were crushed by tanks they failed to stop.
 
Actually, very few brewed up after being hit. The burnt tanks were generally set alight by their crews after a mechanical breakdown (75% of the French tanks losses in 1940). The fast Op tempo and lack of efficient recovery units led to 1000s of tanks and AFVs (an estimated 2,800) being scuttled after sometimes minor breakdowns.

The armor on French tanks of 1940 was far better than anything the Germans had and when tanks were destroyed it's generally after having been hit by an 88 or even a 105 mm round. The 37 mm PaK was useless in most cases and many 37 mm PaK gun crews were crushed by tanks they failed to stop.

Against the Char B1 and the superb Somua S35 yes, but from what I've read even the 'Heeresanklopfgerat' was adequate enough against the French Infantry and Cavalry light tanks. That said, I agree that the majority of French tank losses in 1940 were due to mechanical or logistic issues rather than the attentions of ze Germans.
 
The R35 will be depicted in a Diorama as abandoned by it's crew after a Mechanical breakdown. With 1939/40 era German Infantry using it for cover. The hatches will all be flung open and hopefully, if the kit allows, the engine detail exposed as the crew tried to restart it.
german infantry box art.jpg
 

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