Georgian TV reporter shot live on air.

#1
Daily Mail said:
Video: Georgian TV reporter shot by Russian sniper during live broadcast carries on with her report with bleeding arm

This is the dramatic moment a TV reporter was shot by a sniper as she reported live from war-torn Georgia.

Tamara Urushadze took a bullet to her left arm in the flashpoint town of Gori as Russian forces continued their illegal occupation.

Bravely, or foolishly, the 32-year-old brunette continued her report after a few moments as other journalists and aid workers dashed for cover.

LINK - Daily mail.
 
#8
Dizzee367 said:
Daily Mail said:
Video: Georgian TV reporter shot by Russian sniper during live broadcast carries on with her report with bleeding arm

This is the dramatic moment a TV reporter was shot by a sniper as she reported live from war-torn Georgia.

Tamara Urushadze took a bullet to her left arm in the flashpoint town of Gori as Russian forces continued their illegal occupation.

Bravely, or foolishly, the 32-year-old brunette continued her report after a few moments as other journalists and aid workers dashed for cover.



LINK - Daily mail.
No body armour - silly cow: She probably didn’t want to spoil her look.
There are so many cowboys out there now due to fact that broadcast cameras are relatively cheap. These ‘heroes’ get in the way – shoot things they shouldn’t and then get themselves shot.

The BBC nearly lost a whole crew to a Russian aircraft because they parked the crew's black SUV on the top of a ridge close to an area already under fire.

Top tip:
Don't point your camera at Israeli tanks: The commander will assume you are holding an RPG:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gk9_5OUWy3M

This guy was good and should have known better.
 
#14
KGB_resident said:
I'm curious, what was used as 'blood'? Tomato juice or Heinz ketchup?
Sergey,

It would appear that the Russians learned from the Iraqi playbook. Shoot at the civilian press scaring them out of the area and then you can control the information coming into and going out of the battlefield.

Don't think it would fly for the US, but then again, it is effective I suppose.
 
#15
ghost_us said:
KGB_resident said:
I'm curious, what was used as 'blood'? Tomato juice or Heinz ketchup?
Sergey,

It would appear that the Russians learned from the Iraqi playbook. Shoot at the civilian press scaring them out of the area and then you can control the information coming into and going out of the battlefield.

Don't think it would fly for the US, but then again, it is effective I suppose.
I don't know, the Yanks gave it a go.
 
#17
KGB_resident said:
I'm curious, what was used as 'blood'? Tomato juice or Heinz ketchup?
I dunno can they get Heinz in georgia?

my tuppence (the opinions expressed are entirely the users and have no link to UK government lies sorry Uk government policy)

We need georgia in NATO like we need an extra hole to sh1t out of.
 
#18
jimmys_best_mate said:
ghost_us said:
KGB_resident said:
I'm curious, what was used as 'blood'? Tomato juice or Heinz ketchup?
Sergey,

It would appear that the Russians learned from the Iraqi playbook. Shoot at the civilian press scaring them out of the area and then you can control the information coming into and going out of the battlefield.

Don't think it would fly for the US, but then again, it is effective I suppose.
I don't know, the Yanks gave it a go.
That was an unfortunate event however do you have 3 other examples from a 1 week period?


Reacting to the ruling, a Pentagon spokesman said that an investigation into the incident was completed in May 2003 and determined that US forces followed normal rules of engagement.

He added: "The Department of Defence has never deliberately targeted non-combatants, including journalists. We have always gone to extreme measures to avoid civilian casualties and collateral damage.

"It has been an unfortunate reality that journalists have died in Iraq. Combat operations are inherently dangerous and we do not take lightly our responsibilities in the conduct of these operations.

"We do not, nor would we ever, deliberately target a non-combatant civilian or journalist."

During the eight-day inquest, Mr Walker heard how Mr Lloyd and his team had crossed from Kuwait into Iraq as one of ITN’s few unilateral teams, where journalists work independently of the Armed Forces.
It's unfortunate that this reporter felt that he didn't need to coordinate his moves with the military units in theater and ultimately paid for that mistake with his life.

I have seen plenty of video documentation where at least 2-3 instances of journos being shot or shot at in the past 7 days nor have the press been allowed to get to or report from the battlefield.

We both know, that while you may hand wring thinking I'm calling the kettle black, it's not nearly the same thing now is it.
 
#19
BiscuitsAB said:
KGB_resident said:
I'm curious, what was used as 'blood'? Tomato juice or Heinz ketchup?
I dunno can they get Heinz in georgia?
Out of the theme but I adore namely Heinz ketchup and consume it in big quantities.

The Georgians have their own sauce Tkemali made primarily of plums and various other spices. Tkemali is usually used with meat or potato dishes much like ketchup.

Ir doesn't look like blood though.

In fact the incident is insignificat because really no one was seriously hurt.
 

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