George Cross for Iraq war hero

#1
MoD has released the latest Operational Honours list, which includes a GC for Capt Peter Norton, RLC

<snip>On 24 July last year, a three-vehicle US patrol was rocked by a huge blast in the Al Bayaa district near Baghdad, which killed four and injured several others. Capt Norton, a married father-of-two, who lives at RAF Innsworth in Gloucester, led a team to the scene.

Despite being told about the threat of a secondary explosion, he instructed the coalition forces to stay in their vehicles and alone went forward to confirm whether a command wire was present. An explosion caused extensive injuries to his legs, arms and lower abdomen.

But as he lay injured he calmly instructed the others about which areas were safe and another bomb was discovered.

His commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Robert Seddon, made that device safe and was awarded the Queen's Commendation for Bravery <snip>
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4839694.stm

Full list at:

http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/D...perationalHonoursAndAwardsList24March2006.htm
 
#2
Archimedes said:
MoD has released the latest Operational Honours list, which includes a GC for Capt Peter Norton, RLC

<snip>On 24 July last year, a three-vehicle US patrol was rocked by a huge blast in the Al Bayaa district near Baghdad, which killed four and injured several others. Capt Norton, a married father-of-two, who lives at RAF Innsworth in Gloucester, led a team to the scene.

Despite being told about the threat of a secondary explosion, he instructed the coalition forces to stay in their vehicles and alone went forward to confirm whether a command wire was present. An explosion caused extensive injuries to his legs, arms and lower abdomen.

But as he lay injured he calmly instructed the others about which areas were safe and another bomb was discovered.

His commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Robert Seddon, made that device safe and was awarded the Queen's Commendation for Bravery <snip>
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4839694.stm

Full list at:

http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/D...perationalHonoursAndAwardsList24March2006.htm

Respect!
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#4
sweatysock said:
Well Done. To Capt Norton & Lt Col Sheldon.

I hope he has recovered from his injury's.
Well his leg won't grow back !
Read the article.


Well deserved GC for Capt Norton, I wish him luck with his future.
 
#5
Excellent news. Well done.



Just a quick question. Why a GC? I was under the impression it was the utlimate award for actions of bravery not in a combat situation. The circumstances were clearly combat related and directly the result of enemy action. Might have mis read it a bit though. Any thoughts?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#6
Flash, it might be to do with there being no adoo abut at the time, but that's only a swag.


At about the same time an official memorandum on the subject was circulated within the War Office setting out the details of a cross to be awarded for 'a signal act of valour in the presence of the enemy'.
http://www.victoriacross.org.uk/aahistor.htm


Great Britain's highest award, the Victoria Cross (VC), was awarded for most conspicuous bravery, a daring or preeminent act of valour, self sacrifice or extreme devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.
http://www.theaerodrome.com/medals/gbritain/vc.php
 
#7
The spoiler is probably the word 'presence'. Personally, I think it should have been a VC. I'm quite certain that in that position the only thing I'd have been capable of sending over the radio would have been 'Arrgh! My fcuking leg! Arrgh that hurts! Medic!' or similar...
 
#9
Archimedes said:
MoD has released the latest Operational Honours list, which includes a GC for Capt Peter Norton, RLC

<snip>On 24 July last year, a three-vehicle US patrol was rocked by a huge blast in the Al Bayaa district near Baghdad, which killed four and injured several others. Capt Norton, a married father-of-two, who lives at RAF Innsworth in Gloucester, led a team to the scene.

Despite being told about the threat of a secondary explosion, he instructed the coalition forces to stay in their vehicles and alone went forward to confirm whether a command wire was present. An explosion caused extensive injuries to his legs, arms and lower abdomen.

But as he lay injured he calmly instructed the others about which areas were safe and another bomb was discovered.

His commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Robert Seddon, made that device safe and was awarded the Queen's Commendation for Bravery <snip>
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4839694.stm

Full list at:

http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/D...perationalHonoursAndAwardsList24March2006.htm
Bravery indeed - I am in awe of anyone who does that job and they have my utmost respect. Congratulations to Capt Norton - I wish him and his family all the best for the future.

Congratulations to all the other award recipients too.

PS Is Capt Norton the chap for whom The Longest Walk was done?
 
#12
Sorry if this is deemed flippant or inappropriate but I'm sure the guy himself would see the joke. Concerns a para in the Falklands war who lost a leg. He told his mates as they rendered first aid "I've lost my leg". Response was "No you haven't - it's over there" Might be urban myth but sums up the fortitude of our soldiers as so well displayed by this officer.
 
#17
The Times March 24, 2006



George Cross for Iraq war hero
By Michael Evans, Defence Editor


THE blast tore off his left leg at the knee, drove shrapnel into his other limbs and flung the bomb disposal officer high above the Iraqi road.

Despite his injuries, Captain Peter Norton retained the composure to warn his men of another device hidden nearby.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2100909,00.html

A very brave man. Well done.
 
#19
It's the very least he deserves, what a valiant chap. Well done. (We should clone him)

Quoted from the BBC website:

Defence Secretary John Reid said: "These individuals have shown outstanding courage, bravery and tenacity in the face of the enemy or in particularly dangerous circumstances.

"They have shown exceptional commitment to their country and their heroic actions fill me with a great sense of humility and pride."


- could be the most accurate thing he's ever said!
 
#20
In what was is dealing with a command wire "action not in the face of the enemy"? Surely an enemy on the end of a command wire is in your face in the same way as an enemy looking down the sights of a rifle?

Case for a VC rather than GC?
 

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