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Genuine question

#1
I see a lot of people getting called "Walt" that obviously deserve it (claiming to be ex-SAS, etc.), but a lot of people getting labelled for merely buying an army surplus rucksack, or wearing 95 pattern Dpm to go fishing, etc. as well as those who buy "military" fashion wear (which is definitely in vogue at the moment).

I'm not in the services, although I was a cadet at school as it seemed like fun and (for me) a way of understanding a small part of what members of my family went through when they joined up, etc. I've owned combat trousers and stuff in the past, including an army backpack of indeterminate origin, as they were cheap and rugged for camping/festivals and DIY. Does that make me a "Walt"? I would assume not, but some may disagree.

I see a lot of people slamming airsofters, yet it's a harmless activity that encourages kids and office workers alike to get out and enjoy the countryside and engage in some teamwork and competition. Yes, some might want to replicate a Desert Storm loadout, or look like they are a WW2 commando, but surely that should be taken as a compliment? After all most football fans have a team replica shirt in their wardrobe yet have never kicked a ball in a premiership match or FA cup final.

I can understand frustration and anger at someone claiming to be part of a regiment when they weren't, as that is dishonest, but a little hero-worship doesn't do anyone any harm and it is surely more flattering and a sign that people support our forces?

I am no tryin to troll, as I am genuinely curious to canvas opinion and understand where the line is drawn.

I have t served myself, but my father is ex-REME, his brother was a Marine and SBS operator (saw action in the Suez, Borneo, etc) and my grandfathers were scots guards and a commando inWW2 respectively, along with other forces members in my family (including a second cousin who volunteered and served with the US artillery for three tours of Vietnam), so I have the utmost respect for all service personnel. In recent times, my wife has a cousin in the King's Troop, so the respect and support is not just historical.

Thanks for your time and I look forward to your thoughts.
 
#4
Well, I typed the message on an iPad, hence the piss-poor spelling/spacing in places, so apologies for that.

I don't see that anything I asked is particularly contentious, as I just wanted to understand if it is something that everyone identifies in the same way, or if it is a purely personal viewpoint as to what is, or isn't, "Walt". If it is, no offence was meant and I honestly apologise.
 
#5
That's true - having a three year-old daughter, means I have seen my share of Mr Tumble.

I do recall being taught some rudimentary sign language at primary school but other than "cup of tea", I would struggle to remember it after 30 years!
 
#8
I see a lot of people getting called "Walt" that obviously deserve it (claiming to be ex-SAS, etc.), but a lot of people getting labelled for merely buying an army surplus rucksack, or wearing 95 pattern Dpm to go fishing, etc. as well as those who buy "military" fashion wear (which is definitely in vogue at the moment).

I'm not in the services, although I was a cadet at school as it seemed like fun and (for me) a way of understanding a small part of what members of my family went through when they joined up, etc. I've owned combat trousers and stuff in the past, including an army backpack of indeterminate origin, as they were cheap and rugged for camping/festivals and DIY. Does that make me a "Walt"? I would assume not, but some may disagree.

I see a lot of people slamming airsofters, yet it's a harmless activity that encourages kids and office workers alike to get out and enjoy the countryside and engage in some teamwork and competition. Yes, some might want to replicate a Desert Storm loadout, or look like they are a WW2 commando, but surely that should be taken as a compliment? After all most football fans have a team replica shirt in their wardrobe yet have never kicked a ball in a premiership match or FA cup final.

I can understand frustration and anger at someone claiming to be part of a regiment when they weren't, as that is dishonest, but a little hero-worship doesn't do anyone any harm and it is surely more flattering and a sign that people support our forces?

I am no tryin to troll, as I am genuinely curious to canvas opinion and understand where the line is drawn.

I have t served myself, but my father is ex-REME, his brother was a Marine and SBS operator (saw action in the Suez, Borneo, etc) and my grandfathers were scots guards and a commando inWW2 respectively, along with other forces members in my family (including a second cousin who volunteered and served with the US artillery for three tours of Vietnam), so I have the utmost respect for all service personnel. In recent times, my wife has a cousin in the King's Troop, so the respect and support is not just historical.

Thanks for your time and I look forward to your thoughts.
Walt walt? Damnit, I was doing so well too!
 
#10
I guess that answers my question - it would seem that, anyone with a passing interest in understanding what their relatives went/ are going through is a "walt". Fair enough.
 
#11
Don't take it to heart, real walting (imo) is about pretending to be something you weren't, wandering around in a DPM jacket is not quite the same thing as claiming to be a SAS trained sniper/paramedic. Much of the walt-calling is part of the great British tradition of piss taking and I don't think anyone would question your inerest in 'how things are/were'

Mind you, I'm an ex crab so I occasionally walt as a former member of an organised armed force
 
#17
Don't take it to heart, real walting (imo) is about pretending to be something you weren't, wandering around in a DPM jacket is not quite the same thing as claiming to be a SAS trained sniper/paramedic. Much of the walt-calling is part of the great British tradition of piss taking and I don't think anyone would question your inerest in 'how things are/were'

Mind you, I'm an ex crab so I occasionally walt as a former member of an organised armed force
Oh, I don't take it to heart - and I appreciate that there is an element of piss-taking involved in any British institution and I have a thick skin!

Thanks for your point of view, though - for the reasons i gave earlier, I am genuinely interested to understand the way you guys think.
 
#18
It's quite simple. If you wear articles of uniform cos they. Look cool or are practical fine and dandy. If you wear them and claim to be something your not you a Walt. Also being a cadet does not give you any insight into what your forebears did as I doubt they got fingered by any bad men! ;)
 
#19
It's quite simple. If you wear articles of uniform cos they. Look cool or are practical fine and dandy. If you wear them and claim to be something your not you a Walt. Also being a cadet does not give you any insight into what your forebears did as I doubt they got fingered by any bad men! ;)
True, but it is as close as I could get at the age of 12!
 
#20
Fucking Barry Bucknell Walt!!!!
I know, and made myself late for the pub.

But on second thoughts, the brass cutter adjusting nut looks wider than a Stanley. Could be a Footprint? Still Sheffield made, of course.

Did you know Barry Bucknell designed the Mirror Dinghy?
 

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