General Sir Mike Jackson: Soldier

#2
Read it..........too much "ooh how good am I "for my liking,and the fact he butchered many famous regiments sticks in my crop.
 
#3
I now think he is spineless, the current CGS is the best this great nation has had since Monty, he is a man with courage who stands up for OUR rights when he's in the chair, and not gobbing off when he cannot do anything about it, once he left. good riddence Sugar Puff Teeth!!
 
#4
What about FM W Slim blobmister?
As good as Monty was Bill was better than sir mike any day of the week

Saw General Jackson in 2000 his car had a pollished skull on the bonnet.
 
#5
I think it is the mark of the man as to how he behaves in office. I agree the current CGS does seem to be prepared to stand up for his 'troops' when in the hot seat, unlike so many of his predecessors, who wait until they retire before they open their mouths.

I hope Jackson writes a better book than the last two I have read by generals. I had to give up half way through as the style was dry and to 'me', 'me'.
 
#6
Totally agree with Blob. I never heard him criticising the government about lack of manpower/equipment etc to do the job when he was in the position to do so. Once his pension was safe he spoke out. Spineless tw@t.
 
#7
I thought the book was a really good insight into the dealings of people at that level.

I know he chopped many famous regiments and I like the fact that he doesn't shy away from that in the book. I also like the way he recalls putting Alex Salmond in his place for whinging about the loss of Scottish Regiments that were failing hideously to recruit.

I thought he was a good leader when he was in power and I think he's a good leader now. After reading the book, I also think he's extremely articulate and a very good writer.

I know we criticise for not "speaking out" when they are in post, but I genuinely believe more can be done at that level in private than by gobbing off to the media and the book suggests that he had more than one or two private conversations.
 
F

fozzy

Guest
#9
benv88 said:
Any read/reading this book? I'm about half way through and only bought it yesterday, its a pretty solid read so far.
I gave up about 2/3rds of the way through. I thought it pretty dull and turgid. It's now in the charity shop.
 
#10
I know what you mean fozzy. For some reason these generals just can't write. Sure, tell a story about themselves, but the style is awful. I am not going to waste any money on his book, not even one from the charity shop.
 
#12
Highflight said:
Chibber, you are General Jackson. Come on now Mikey, admit it.
Did I tell you about me? I'm great!!!

Seriously- in his book he never mentioned anything about the surgery he had done to his eyes towards the end of his career.
 
#14
fozzy said:
benv88 said:
Any read/reading this book? I'm about half way through and only bought it yesterday, its a pretty solid read so far.
I gave up about 2/3rds of the way through. I thought it pretty dull and turgid. It's now in the charity shop.
I guess I have not read enough stimulating books recently as I am finding it fairly interesting, particularly when he is discussing Northern Ireland, however he does harp on a lot about some pretty uninteresting things. I'm up to brigadier level so i guess things will go down hill from here on. It has been a nice change of pace though as i have been reading two books on sir Alfred Milner and the empire in preparation for a book review :(
 
#15
I found the book quite interesting in the sense of perspective it gave me of Jackson's career. The insight he provides on N.I I also find fascinating as that era was before my time :D (Not to make any of you fellas feel your age or anything)

He gives off the impression that more through luck of situation and openings that an officer of a good able level can reach the position he did without ever being anything ever really extraordinary.

Top marks for his handling of the Russian's at Pristina though. :D
 

Mr Happy

LE
Moderator
#16
I've read it. I liked it and I would recommend it.

One nark though is a lack of talking about his colleagues, there's lots about his equals, e.g. you hear about his mentor and equals, but precious little about his blokes.

Another nark would be a lack of humour. Whilst I've never met him, I assume he has one?

Still you can insert your own jokes..
 
#17
I think its a pretty good read. Interesting to see the progression of a senior officer that didn't serve with "them", a different perspective on N.i to that in most books and very interesting insight into the path to the top, the way it has been laid-out from command to college etc in a way that no other book has.

Sure, Its a bit "me, me, me" but what book of this type is not? Its written by him, about him and his career; that is to be expected - you've only to compare it with similar books or those bios of busness leaders and the like who have made it to the top of a large organisation.

Not a gripping read but certanly interesting.
 
#18
von_Richthofen said:
Top marks for his handling of the Russian's at Pristina though. :D
Does he mention the daily bottle of whiskey delivered every morning?

A very good friend of mine, killed by ragheads in 03, was his BG and said those discussions with the Serbs in the Cafe on the border were an out and out piss up for the top brass who knew what the outcome was going to be but enjoyed the crack.

God bless ya Colin!
 
#19
feckemall said:
von_Richthofen said:
Top marks for his handling of the Russian's at Pristina though. :D
Does he mention the daily bottle of whiskey delivered every morning?

A very good friend of mine, killed by ragheads in 03, was his BG and said those discussions with the Serbs in the Cafe on the border were an out and out urine up for the top brass who knew what the outcome was going to be but enjoyed the crack.

God bless ya Colin!
He doesn't put it in quite that way, but he does mention a few bottles of the strong stuff changing hands!
 
#20
I've just read this book, and thought it was a great read. The first couple of chapters struck me as though he was trying a little too hard to advertise the army, however this died off after the first few chapters. I was very interested to read about his Northern Ireland, Bosnian and Kosovo experiences, Iraq and Afghanistan not so much, however her did raise some very valid points that had Washington and Whitehall planned the two operations better, in particular regarding reconstruction after the original 'maneuvre war' as he puts it, we would most likely be in a much better situation than we are now. His justifications for the difficulties with kit issue etc. seemed valid to me, and his accounts of his time at the MoD enlightened me of the difficulties of dealing with the kind of people responsible for such difficulties. (wow, too many difficulties in that sentence.) But anyway, I though it was a really good read, and I have alot more respect for the man than I did before reading the book. For those saying that the book is a little bit me, me, me, well really, what do you expect from an autobiography?
 

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