Genealogy software recommendations?

Must admit that I have printed hard copies of the family tree and used old fashioned cut and paste to easily view the big picture .
One of the failings of the software I am using is that it does not give good printing functionality for all of the details associated with each member on the tree . All the info can be viewed on the screen but only limited in print form . To be honest I have not found this as a major problem for something I got for free . Again such enhanced functionality is probably available now in more recent free software .
 
msr said:
4(T) said:
Since the old man has never really done anything academic, and is barely PC-literate,
This:


msr
Can I second this?

Of course using a website helps to expand into areas you weren't aware of, but in twenty years time, who will have access to the software you use this weekend? Also, your version of the family tree will itself become a family heirloom, something touched and in part written by great great grandad. I reckon that'll mean a lot more to your grandkids than a program on a laptop in the attic.
 
Sympathetic_Reaction said:
Taffnp said:
Sympathetic_Reaction said:
The hardest part is getting back to the early 1900's, the census doesn't kick in until 1901,

S_R
1911 census is available now, looked at some details yesterday. Had great difficulty finding anyone and had to try a variety of searches before I achieved any success.

Can also use Register of electors at the local library, most libraries now have a good family history section

Didn't think that came out till 2011...hmmm so much for the 100 year rule.
As Seaweed said, I did the majority of my early work for free, local library, online free websites (does cyndi's list still exist?, worth checking), this was great when i had the time to go to physical locations, since i have to work nowadays I find the £10 a month for Ancestry.com is cheaper than driving to Cardiff and paying for the parking fees.


S_R
A combination of inadequate parliamentary drafting back in the early 1900s and the current Freedom of Information Act, IIRC!

Very useful, though, and worth a look if you are researching your family. Scotland's 1911 census is not open until Jan 2011.

I agree with Seaweed's detailed post.

I use an old version of Family Tree Maker.

But I also agree that a roll of wallpaper and a good paper-based filing system might be better for a non-pc-literate gentleman!!!

I also agree with the poster who warned that the addiction is worse than heroin....

Litotes
 
Family tree software is just a tool where you store data. What I have done is use this to print an account from the earliest days which I have put into two files. These combine copies of military records, Census records, old photos of the areas, houses they lived in and Churches where they were Baptised married and buried. I have had to make two files under word, one titled famport, and famland, for landscape and portrait. Periodically I will scribble notes in the book and occasionally make a full reprint of my files when the ammendments become significant. I also made a powerpoint presentation, which uses hyperlinks to branch to different families. Whatever you use, the main thing is to document everything otherwise you will find yourself going back over old ground at a later date.
 
angular said:
Can I second this?

Of course using a website helps to expand into areas you weren't aware of, but in twenty years time, who will have access to the software you use this weekend? Also, your version of the family tree will itself become a family heirloom, something touched and in part written by great great grandad. I reckon that'll mean a lot more to your grandkids than a program on a laptop in the attic.
20 years? No probs. The software itself isn't of interest, it's the database and just as today, you can import from older or other types of file or database. 2000 years might be a bit different though.
All info and databases should be stored on archive quality DVDs along with hard copy print outs of everything.

Also, there's a much better chance that someone 100 years down the line will be able to read something printed or on a computer. Think of how illegible so much of all those handwritten sources we use are, an absolute mare.
 

jcm649

War Hero
4,
as a long time Genealogy addict (yes it can get that bad) I thought I would add to the other very good advice you already have in this thread.
Firstly the key is to talk to as many living relatives as you can find before they shuffle off. Record the information in any way you feel comfortable, PC Package, pen & paper or thick crayon, recording conversations is also useful.
As far as PC tools go, all the packages have strengths and weaknesses, my favourite, having tried most of them is Legacy from HERE this is supplied (free) by the Mormons themselves, so it cant be that bad. It has built in links to the IGI database etc.
UK births marriages etc can be found at FreeeBMD which is a very usefull resource.
One of the better paying resources is Find My Past, which offers a pay as you go option so you can start small and see if it works for you, most of the others require an up front subscription.
See how you get on, if you need any help/advice feel free to drop me a PM or post on here, only too happy to help.
 
I am giving this 10 year old Thread a bump because, well its 10 years old and recommendations may change.

A brother wants to put all his research into a proper database, genaeology, pictures and use any features modern software has to fill in gaps.

Over to the vast pool of knowledge that is Arrse.
 

jcm649

War Hero
I am giving this 10 year old Thread a bump because, well its 10 years old and recommendations may change.

A brother wants to put all his research into a proper database, genaeology, pictures and use any features modern software has to fill in gaps.

Over to the vast pool of knowledge that is Arrse.
My reply in the post above yours is still valid in spite of being 10 years old, the only thing I would add is the use of Ancestry.
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top